Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.

Remote education for children and young people with SEND

Slides for providers and practitioners to use to reflect on the challenges they face in delivering remote education during the pandemic. The lessons learnt can also inform future planning for children and young people with SEND. For more information and a video, visit https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/remote-education-and-send/how-remote-education-is-working-for-children-and-young-people-with-send

  • Soyez le premier à commenter

Remote education for children and young people with SEND

  1. 1. Remote education for children and young people with SEND A discussion pack for leaders and practitioners Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 1
  2. 2. Background  We published research into remote education in January 2021.  This research is a follow-up from that, looking specifically at remote education for children and young people with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND).  This slide pack accompanies a video presentation on YouTube. In these, we share some of what we have learned about how remote education is working.  We also take a look forward and explore how some of these things might influence future practice.  We hope it will be useful to leaders, practitioners, special educational needs coordinators (SENCos) and other people working with and for children and young people with SEND. Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 2
  3. 3. A YouGov survey told us: of parents of a child with SEND said that they had disengaged with remote education, compared with 39% without additional needs. of the teachers surveyed stated that their school offered additional remote learning arrangements for pupils with SEND. 3 Remote education for children and young people with SEND - February 2021
  4. 4. Definition of remote education Remote education research (Ofsted, January 2021) Any learning that happens outside of the classroom, with the teacher not present in the same location as the child or young person.  This should aim to deliver a high-quality curriculum so that pupils know and remember more.  This can be delivered through a combination of face-to- face and remote methods.
  5. 5. Points to consider  Remote education is a vehicle for delivering a high-quality curriculum. The purpose of the education remains the same, and that is: for pupils to understand, remember and apply the knowledge they are taught in the curriculum.  Remote education does not necessarily mean it is delivered digitally, through online lessons. It can be delivered through a range of methods using digital and non-digital methods.  While elements of remote education have proven useful, it cannot provide the same offer of education that children and young people would receive in their school or college setting.  Remote education may be something we see more of in the future, so it’s important to learn how to do it well for all children and young people, especially those with SEND who may be more vulnerable to the impact of disruption in their education. Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 5
  6. 6. Important context  We know that everyone is learning about how to do this well.  Our understanding of how to do this well is developing all the time.  This is a complicated challenge for all children and young people, parents/carers and providers.  This is not a final answer, but we hope it gives providers some space for reflection on the learning that has happened and how remote education is working for children and young people with SEND. Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 6
  7. 7. What has worked well in providing remote education for children and young people with SEND? Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 7
  8. 8. Learning Attending Engaging Learning  Careful selection and sequencing of curriculum content continues to be important for children and young people with SEND.  Remote education provides opportunities for children and young people to work on specific objectives and targets in their education, health and care (EHC) and SEND support plans.
  9. 9. Decisions about what children and young people need to learn are still important  The curriculum still needs to be planned and sequenced.  New knowledge and skills should build on what has been taught before as well as towards clearly defined end points.  Careful selection and sequencing of curriculum content means focusing on the most important things for children and young people with SEND to learn so that they can remember and use the knowledge they are acquiring confidently and well.  This is especially important for children and young people with SEND and in the current context where there are likely to be fewer opportunities for learning with a teacher in a classroom. Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 9
  10. 10. Opportunities that have come from remote education  In some cases, children and young people have been able to work on specific objectives and targets in their EHC and SEND support plans.  Learning at home and in the local community can help pupils to transfer and generalise important knowledge and skills in meaningful and functional ways.  For example, ‘preparing a meal for myself’, where teachers have provided pictorial instructions to help the child or young person prepare a meal at home. Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 10
  11. 11. Opportunities that have come from remote education  Children and young people with SEND have benefited from being taught the ‘code’ of online learning.  This helps them with engaging and interacting online.  Being able to put their virtual hand up, mute and unmute and contribute to virtual lessons can be the difference between being a passive recipient and an active participant.  However, attending doesn’t mean engaging, and engaging doesn’t necessarily lead to learning. Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 11
  12. 12. Discussion points  Curriculum planning and sequencing  Making the most of opportunities that have come from remote education
  13. 13. Teaching Capacity of parents and carers to support learning activities has a significant impact on remote education for children and young people with SEND, especially those with more significant and complex needs. Creating structure and routine in remote education approaches are important for children and young people with SEND. Asynchronous approaches give children and young people with SEND the opportunity to work at their own pace and ‘revisit’ curriculum content.
  14. 14. How teaching practices have been adapted  Structure and routine  Children and young people with SEND can benefit from structure and routine.  Some children and young people with autism had settled in well to the routine of learning at home because the school had set up a tight timetable of lessons and they liked the routine and familiarity.  Shorter, more frequent lessons with learning organised into bite-size chunks works well for some children and young people with SEND. They can revisit content – for example – by watching sequences again. Follow-up 1:1 sessions can then pick up anything that they have found more difficult.  Some children and young people with SEND have been accessing pre- recorded lessons or work packs. This has allowed them to learn at their own pace, and in some cases revisit the learning then contact the teacher separately to ask questions. Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 14
  15. 15. How teaching practices have been adapted  Teaching materials  Leaders had adapted curriculum materials for children and young people with SEND.  Some teachers used telephone calls to children and young people or parents to give information and guidance about the learning activities.  It is important for providers to give clear guidance to children, young people and parents about the intended learning and what the children and young people have to do. The adult can then support their child’s learning.  Some children and young people with SEND received hard-copy packs of materials for remote learning. Some teachers also provided information packs for parents and carers, which helped them to feel more confident about supporting their child’s learning at home. Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 15
  16. 16. Discussion points  Structure and routine  Timetabling  Lesson length and focus  Individual follow-up  Teaching materials  Guidance sent home  Information packs
  17. 17. The role of support staff  Providing 1:1 support for children and young people with an EHC plan.  Managing breakout rooms.  Replying to questions using the chat function.  Keeping in touch with children and young people with SEND through phone calls, emails or instant messages.
  18. 18. The role of support staff • The availability of teaching assistants (TAs) or learning support assistants to support learning activities has also had a significant impact on remote education for children and young people with SEND. • In many cases, TAs have maintained their supporting role during the pandemic. For example: • Some pupils with an EHC plan had been allocated a TA as a key worker who called the child or young person every day to check they were able to access the work, and to provide support. • TAs have been providing support in a range of ways: on a 1:1 basis, in breakout rooms or in managing the ‘chat’ in online lessons. • Support staff have also played a role in organising social activities, such as a virtual music clubs or supported social calls on Zoom. Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 18
  19. 19. The role of support staff  Frequent dialogue with parents and carers as well as with children and young people with SEND during this time is vitally important.  Support staff have played a crucially important role in this ongoing communication with pupils’ homes.  They have provided a point of contact for the children and young people with SEND through email, phone calls or instant messages. Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 19
  20. 20. Discussion points  Helpful but realistic levels of support given to families  Levels and quality of contact between school or college and home
  21. 21. Assessment: Has the curriculum been taught?  Identifying the most crucial curriculum content children and young people need to learn has to be the first and most important step. This is because it is knowledge of this content that should be assessed.  Assessment of what children and young people with SEND need to know, remember and do may be particularly challenging in remote education.  Examples of assessment activities include: low stakes tasks, quizzes, polls, use of ‘chat’, discussion and the use of video.  Conversations, videos and pictures have all been used as assessment tools.
  22. 22. How is assessment working?  Our definition of progress is knowing more, remembering more and being able to do more.  Many providers described assessment as a ‘work in progress’.  Feedback and assessment are especially important for children and young people with SEND.  This is harder when they are learning remotely.  Some schools were assessing what has or has not been done rather than what children and young people have learned. Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 22
  23. 23. How is assessment working?  Mainstream schools are using low-stakes assessments that can give a basic indication of what children and young people have learned. Tactics include:  quizzes  multiple choice questions  chat boxes/poll. Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 23
  24. 24. How is assessment working?  Providers have found 1:1 conversations with the child or young person – and their parent or carer – a useful tool for assessing progress.  Where outcomes or targets from learning and support plans for individuals have been shared with parents, some schools have discussed ways that parents can carry out activities and share evidence of progress towards theses. This includes giving ideas of how this could be done (for example, photographs or videos) and support to do this. Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 24
  25. 25. Discussion points  Assessing learning, not what has been done  Low-stakes assessment tactics  Parental engagement and involvement
  26. 26. Multi-agency support  Therapists are adapting their practice successfully.  Some interventions have been suspended, or delivered through support staff or parents and carers.  Providing the resources and support children and young people with SEND need to communicate is important.  Parents and carers have welcomed some aspects of telehealth and virtual appointments.
  27. 27. The team around a child or young person  The team around a child or young person with SEND remains vitally important for their specific needs to be met.  Maintaining therapeutic input has been a challenge. Therapists are adapting their practice successfully, including using online technologies to support parents and carers as well as children and young people.  Professionals have needed to be creative in trying to ensure that they can continue to provide what’s needed. Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 27
  28. 28. The team around a child  Providing the resources and support that children and young people with SEND need to communicate is very important. This includes ensuring that different types of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) are available and ready for children and young people to use:  programming digital devices with the relevant vocabulary  providing resources such as symbols for communication books and picture exchange communication systems (PECS)  providing objects of reference  visual schedules. Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 28
  29. 29. Discussion points  Ways of maintaining therapeutic support  Adequate communication resources  Making the most of digital platforms to deliver assessments or review meetings
  30. 30. Bridging the gap between home and school Set reasonable expectations. Set Explain what the child or young person is learning. Explain Explore the other factors that may impact on the child or young persons’ learning. Collaborate Collaborate on how to make home a good learning environment. Explore Make reasonable adjustments based on what you have found. Adjust Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 30
  31. 31. Thank you!  During this challenging time, providers, leaders, practitioners, parents and carers, and, most importantly, children and young people, have shown resilience and adaptability.  As we have already said, remote education may be something we see more of in the future. It is really important that we learn how to do it well for all children and young people, but especially those with SEND, because future disruption is likely to have an even greater impact on them.  We hope people will continue to reflect on how remote education has worked for children and young people with SEND.  If you found this and/or the video helpful, please share it with others in your networks or organisations. Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 31
  32. 32. Ofsted on the web and on social media www.gov.uk/ofsted https://reports.ofsted.gov.uk www.linkedin.com/company/ofsted www.youtube.com/ofstednews www.slideshare.net/ofstednews www.twitter.com/ofstednews Remote education for children and young people with SEND – February 2021 Slide 32

×