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33 insurtechs to know

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Vladislav Solodkiy for InsurTech Conf 2016 in Singapore.

Publié dans : Économie & finance
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33 insurtechs to know

  1. 1. InsurTech The Next Billion-dollar Opportunity
  2. 2. www.lifesreda.com www.fintech-research.com www.fintechranking.com 2012 - 2014 13 investments (US, UK, Germany, CIS) 6 investments (South East Asia) 6 successful exits I 2015 - II Asia 2016 - MoscowLondon Singapore A new venture fund dedicated to investing in the blockchain ecosystem InspirAsia Own acceleration program and fintech co-working space in Singapore Vladislav Solodkiy Igor Pesin Chris Skinner David Brear Thomas Labenbacher Simon Taylor About Life.SREDA VC
  3. 3. Investments in Insurtech in 2016 $3 billions
  4. 4. Auto insurance companies spend a combined total of $6 billions in advertising each year. Insurance represents a huge opportunity that has yet to see real innovation. The major players have some of the lowest Net Promoter Score (NPS) ratings of any industry, meaning the companies do not inspire satisfaction or loyalty in their cus- tomers. People do not like or trust insurance companies. COMPARE IT WITH
  5. 5. The world of 59 years olds with fax The $1.1 trillion in insurance premiums recorded in 2013 by the U.S. Department of Treasury represented approximately 7 percent of the U.S. GDP. The average age of life insurance agents is 59 years old, and it’s estimated there are an average of three duplicate processes in each customer sale. It’s not out of the realm of possibility that your insurance compa- ny will at some point ask you to fax them something. Today’s consumers want to be able to get educated, get a quote and buy a policy from the comfort of their home (or cell phone) in less than 15 minutes.
  6. 6. Anyone who's ever had an insurance claim knows that getting paid can often turn into a nightmare "Every dollar your insurer pays you is a dollar less for their profits. So when something bad happens to you, their interests are directly conflicted with yours. Your fighting over the same coin." Dan Ariely, a Duke University professor and the Chief Behavioral Officer at Lemonade
  7. 7. Multiple catalysts driving the growth of insurtech industry Wholesale trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,115.8. . . . 1,597.6 . . . . . . . . . . . 481.8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.7 Retail trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,271.3. . . . 1,747.5 . . . . . . . . . . . 476.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2 Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 773.8. . . . 1,160.1 . . . . . . . . . . . 386.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.1 Credit intermediation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801.7. . . . . 1,117.6 . . . . . . . . . . . 315.9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.4 Real estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 977.8. . . . 1,286.4 . . . . . . . . . . . 308.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8 Financial investments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 468.7. . . . . . 742.4 . . . . . . . . . . . 273.6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.7 Health practitioners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576.7. . . . . . 818.2 . . . . . . . . . . . 241.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.6 Telecommunications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 559.8. . . . . . 780.3 . . . . . . . . . . . 220.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.4 Computer equipment manufacturing . . . . . . 139.1. . . . . . 335.8 . . . . . . . . . . . 196.7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.2 Management of companies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367.9. . . . . . 539.0 . . . . . . . . . . . 171.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.9 Petroleum and coal manufacturing . . . . . . . 422.5. . . . . . 544.3 . . . . . . . . . . . 121.8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6 Food services and drinking places . . . . . . . . 491.6. . . . . . 605.1 . . . . . . . . . . . 113.6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1 Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412.1. . . . . . 511.8 . . . . . . . . . . . . 99.6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Data processing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165.9. . . . . . 262.9 . . . . . . . . . . . . 96.9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.7 Motor vehicle manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . 241.4. . . . . . 335.7 . . . . . . . . . . . . 94.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.4 Oil and gas extraction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320.5. . . . . . 410.9 . . . . . . . . . . . . 90.4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 Industries with the Largest Output Growth and Declines Largest Growth, $Bn 2012 2012-2022 2012-20222022 Industry Description Compound Annual Rate of Change Change Annual growth rate p/a Information Utilities 0-1-2-3 321 2002 - 2013 2014 - 2022 Note/source: December 2015 Monthly Labor Review, Industry employment and output projecIons to 2024, U.S. Bureau of Labor StaIsIcs, Employment ProjecIons Program State & Government Federal Government Healthcare Education services Business services Other services Leisure & hospitality Financial activities & Insurance Wholesale trade Retail trade Transportation
  8. 8. Insurance is arguably one of the most old-fashioned Just as fintech is transforming the banking world, “insurtech” has set its sights on the insurance industry. Endemic mistrust and persistently low net promoter scores are providing a ripe opportunity to use technology to shift power back. Yet over the last 18 months, over 100 insurance startups have launched. Many entrepreneurs are waking up to the fact that insurance is arguably one of the most old-fashioned, analog consumer services in existence, and they are creating companies to upend this premise.
  9. 9. InsurTech is not about online-forms (they are a replica of the paper forms) Progressive rethought that process. Most of the start-ups to date have focused on front-end customer interactions rather than the back office, unlike in banking. Perhaps the biggest potential advantage would be reducing claims: by using micro-chips embedded in industrial and everyday appliances – the “Internet of Things” – it could be possible for insurance companies to use such sensors to antici- pate and prevent damage. Vivek Garipalli CEO of Clover Health “There’s a big difference between spending a lot of money on technology and being a technology company”.
  10. 10. 1. Taking risk as an organization (Big organizations don’t like taking risks. The reason to exist for a startup is to endorse that risk and be prepared to make mistakes, learn and improve.) 2. Rewarding risk on a personal level (it doesn’t make sense for the individuals behind big organizations): Don’t punish failed experiments; Encourage intrapreneurship. 3. Thinking digitally 4. Working digitally (Insurtechs are building up their organizations and their processes digitally from the start. Value of open APIs.) 5. Focusing on the customer (services and products are often produced in the silos of the different departments: there is no holistic view for the customer) 6. Solving problems in iterations Tim Kunde, Co-Founder and Managing Director of Friendsurance 6 things that insurance companies can learn from insurtechs in 2016
  11. 11. The digital transformation has reached insurance, as one of the last big offline industries. There are big barriers to entry, but while insurtechs do not have all the answers and the solutions yet, they are best positioned to find them. We have only seen the beginning of the amount of talent and money that will pour into this industry. Companies who think they can still wait a couple of years until they start to embrace digital innovation will cease to exist 10-15 years from now. There is a huge potential to do more business and at the same time create a much more customer friendly industry. Chris Skinner, The BB Fund:
  12. 12. 535 INSURTECHS by VentureScanner
  13. 13. TWO BRANCHES OF INSURTECHS The second branch comprises purely tech-focused companies that are involved with buying, selling or managing health insurance. One branch is composed of actual insurance companies that pay medical claims, con- tract with hospitals and doctors, and take on some kind of risk on behalf of their mem- bers—all with a bigger emphasis on consumer-friendly technology and data.
  14. 14. 33 Insurtech comapnies you should know
  15. 15. While other insurance companies make money when denying claims, Lemonade only takes one flat fee. In addition, they give all unclaimed money to the charity of your choice. What’s more, your charity is pooled with other Lemonade customers who also want to give to that same charity – whether it’s a big international non-profit or your local PTA. So the more left- over money from all of you, the more your charity gets. Since its public launch with a $13 million investment from Sequoia Capital and Israeli venture investor Aleph late last year, Lemonade has amassed a series of impressive wins. www.lemonade.com
  16. 16. The New York health insurance start-up Oscar Health is “a better kind of health insurance company” that aims to use tech- nology and design to improve the experience. The company is now valued at a whopping $1.5 billion after $145 million dol- lars in a Series B round, just a year-and-a-half after its launch. www.hioscar.com
  17. 17. In May 2015 Zenefits has raised $500 million in a round led by Fidelity and TPG at a whopping $4.5 billion valuation (now Zenefits loses over half of its value for internal problems reasons). Unlike most companies that sell HR software to small busi- nesses, Zenefits gives its software away for free. Instead, the company collects a fee from insurance companies every time a customer buys insurance through Zenefits. It’s this piece that has enraged traditional insurance brokers. www.zenefits.com
  18. 18. Hong Kong-based Horizons Ventures, a private investment arm of Li Ka-Shing, has led a US$15.3 million funding round in Berlin-based P2P insurance startup Friendsurance. The way the model works is that everyone contributes to a common pool to mitigate risk, that’s the very nature of insurance. However, in Friendsurance’s case any premiums left over in the fund at the end of year are paid back to contributors, as the risk didn’t happen. www.friendsurance.com
  19. 19. German insurance startup Clark closes €13.2M Series A. Calling itself an “insurance robo-advisor”, Clark’s iOS and Android apps let you manage and purchase various insurance products. Specifically, it uses algorithms to analyze your current in- surance situation and automatically propose opportunities to improve your coverage or the deal you are currently on. The startup’s insurance experts are also on-hand via the app to help with more bespoke insurance questions. www.clark.de
  20. 20. The Floow gathers data from phones and in-vehicle ‘black boxes’ to help make insurance premiums more accurate and even reduce the likelihood of a driver ever having an accident. The Floow monitors smoothness of driving, weather condi- tions, other road users and multiple other data points to tailor insurance premiums to each individual. www.thefloow.com
  21. 21. Trov is an on-demand insurance platform that lets users buy insurance for specific products, for a specific amount of time. Recently with $25.5M in new funding, Trov launched on-demand insurance for individual items. Insurance isn’t necessarily an inviting word, especially for millennials. When a user inputs a certain product (a television, appliance, phone, laptop, musi- cal instrument, surfboard, etc.), Trov simply needs the make and model to generate all the metadata necessary to insure that item. Alongside information about the insurance purchaser, Trov can then generate a to-the-second price for insurance. That user can then turn protection on and off for their various items through a simple swipe. www.trov.com
  22. 22. Cocoon makes an internet-connected security device for the home. www.cocoon.life
  23. 23. Kasko provides a white-label option for instant insurance purchases on affiliate platforms. www.kasko.io
  24. 24. BimaAfya is connecting low income populations in sub-Saharan Africa with health insurance.
  25. 25. Buzzmove provides price comparison for the removals trade; information that is important to insurers after a loss. www.buzzmove.com
  26. 26. Myfuturenow helps connect dormant pension accounts to holders. www.myfuturenow.co.uk www.myfuturenow.co.uk
  27. 27. Roost makes a smart battery for smoke detectors and counts USAA among its investors. www.getroost.com
  28. 28. Augury makes sensors for heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems www.augury.com
  29. 29. CoVi Analytics is a platform for insurers to use the required reporting from Solvency II data in their enterprise in other ways. www.covianalytics.com
  30. 30. Domotz is an Internet of Things management system that offers a platform for insurers to rate risk and manage claims. www.domotz.com
  31. 31. FitSense helps life and health insurers leverage data from wearables. www.fitsense.io
  32. 32. Quantifyle allows users to “shop around” their wearable and other health data to insurance companies and find the best price. www.quantifyle.com
  33. 33. MassUp uses APIs to connect insurers to retailers so people can quickly and easily add coverage to new purchases. www.massup.de
  34. 34. Rightindem is a self-service total loss claims platform that claims to reduce insurers workload and leakage while improving customer service. www.rightindem.com
  35. 35. Safer is designed to help millenials identify what kind of insurance they need by tapping into their social data. Safer
  36. 36. Equally, we must not forget firms using distributed ledgers, like Everledger, who are guaranteeing the provenance of rare items for insurance purposes. www.everledger.io
  37. 37. BigML democratizes machine learning solutions that enable insurance companies to build analytics capabilities faster than ever before. www.bigml.com
  38. 38. Qiy Foundation provides a groundbreaking structure to identity and personal data protection. www.qiyfoundation.org
  39. 39. Traity creates a network that allows people to owe their reputation while increasing trust and transparency in doing business online www.traity.com
  40. 40. TrueMotion creates solutions that enable insurance carriers to implement usage-based insurance con- cepts at much faster speed to market. www.gotruemotion.com
  41. 41. www.policygenius.com Brooklyn-based PolicyGenius provides users with price comparison information on life insurance, long-term disability in- surance, renters insurance and pet insurance, and has raised $15 million in a new round of funding to expand its price com- parison insurance brokerage service.
  42. 42. Quartet Health, a company that wants to close the gap between physical and mental healthcare, has raised a $40 million Series B led by GV (formerly Google Ventures). www.quartethealth.com
  43. 43. In situations where you aren’t worried enough to call the police, but where you do want to reach out to a friend and say “something’s not right here,” freshly launched Guardian Circle has your back. The idea is simple: You add your friends and local contacts to an alert list on the app. www.guardiancircle.com
  44. 44. Zendrive, a startup that uses smartphone sensors to measure drivers’ behavior, has raised $13.5 million in Series A funding led by Sherpa Capital. www.zendrive.com
  45. 45. Austin-based The Zebra, a startup that’s something of a “Kayak for auto insurance,” has been working to bring the process of shopping for insurance online, where consumers can more transparently compare quotes and understand how insurance companies determine rates. The company has raised an additional $17 million in Series A funding. www.thezebra.com
  46. 46. Metromile, the provider that lets you pay-per-mile for insurance, has raised a $191.5 million in funding. Metromile will use the money to acquire an insurance carrier called Mosaic Insurance to handle the underwriting of its policies itself; as well as to expand new states in the U.S. and continue building its platform. Metromile provides a mobile experience that lets users see and track just how much they are using the insurance and how much they will need to pay. It also has other features like ve- hicle location, travel data and more. Investors behind this deal include a couple of insurance giants, Canada’s Intact Financial and China Pacific Insurance (CPIC); top VCs Index Ventures, New Enterprise Associates (NEA), First Round Capital, Mitsui and SV Angel; Metromile founder and Chairman David Friedberg (of Climate Corporation fame); and Mark Cuban. www.metromile.com
  47. 47. Slice Labs offer insurance for on-demand workers and providers like Uber and Airbanb, starting with rideshare drivers and then homeshare hosts. The startup has raised $3.9 million in seed funding from Horizon Ventures and XL Innovate. These products will be available on a transactional basis — so a ridesharing driver should be covered from the moment they start driving or get into the car, but they’re only paying for coverage during the time that they’re working (making it more afford- able than just taking out a pricey commercial insurance policy). www.slice.is
  48. 48. PolicyBazaar is an Indian startup that can sell policies direct-to-consumer. They recognized that only 4 percent of Indian consumers have any non-health insurance and only 2 percent of that 4 percent bought their insurance online. www.policybazaar.com
  49. 49. TRENDS AND AREAS OF DEVELOPMENT IN INSURTECH P2P-insurance = back to the original idea of the mutual company Louis de Broglie, InsPeer “The idea is to use technology to help you leverage your local community – with all its positive as- pects. So it is true that we are coming back to the original idea of the mutual company.”
  50. 50. TRENDS AND AREAS OF DEVELOPMENT IN INSURTECH Sharing economy, self-driving vehicles, millennials (prefer to “use”, not “own”) Dan Preston, CEO Metromile “Metromile’s differentiator is down to “urbanization and a shifting mindset of millennials.” By this, he means that the less frequent and less regular use of cars by these groups makes per-mile ser- vices.” “Our go to market strategy is focused on large urban areas and aimed at developing a brand with each city that we roll out into. The people who switch to pay-per-mile insurance commute differently. They take multiple forms of public transit, walk, bike or even ride-share to work so a usage based option makes more sense to them.”
  51. 51. TRENDS AND AREAS OF DEVELOPMENT IN INSURTECH Today’s world is driven by data There is a huge opportunity for insurance to leverage data platforms to help improve their operations in everything from sales to underwriting. Real-time and near real-time data streaming — everything from environmental sensors to connected devices and wearables — will allow insurers to better manage risk, improve subscriber loyalty and optimize sales opportunities.
  52. 52. TRENDS AND AREAS OF DEVELOPMENT IN INSURTECH PFM AND BLOCKCHAIN Blockchain will be useful (safekeeping of insurance his- tory, the issue of policies and their "journey" between those who issue them, buy them and request them). PFM-services have been actively cooperating with insurers even before;
  53. 53. TRENDS AND AREAS OF DEVELOPMENT IN INSURTECH CYBERINSURANCE IN A DIGITAL WORLD The Verizon 2016 Data Breach Investigation Report: companies large and small, across all industries, in all geographies, are at risk of being targeted by a cyber attack; in fact, it is estimated that 62 percent of cyber breach victims are small to mid-sized businesses. Cyber insurance is a sub-category within the general insurance industry, offering products and services designed to protect businesses from internet-based risks. In just a couple of years, the U.S. cyber insurance market has grown from about 10 insurers to 50 that provide stand-alone cyber insurance policies. In 2015, these providers generated $2.75 billion in premium revenues in the U.S. According to a recent study by PwC, this number is set to triple to $7.5 billion by 2020.
  54. 54. TRENDS AND AREAS OF DEVELOPMENT IN INSURTECH PORN REVENGE AND CYBERBULLING SECURITY A U.S.-based insurance company announced a new policy that specifically covers the damage of online abuse. Chubb Insurance told that its personal cyberbullying insurance would cover coun- seling fees, lost income from taking off of work, and the cost of hiring an online reputation management firm to help remove smears online. Though the policy is aimed at parents whose children may become victims of cy- berbullying, it will also cover adults who are targets of online harassment, which it defines as "three or more acts by the same person or group to harass, threaten or intimidate a customer." Once considered harmless trolling, online harassment is increasingly recognized for its serious offline consequences.
  55. 55. TRENDS AND AREAS OF DEVELOPMENT IN INSURTECH FROM CAR TO DRONE INSURANCE AIG is rolling out a new set of policies aimed at the growing drone industry. The policy offerings are designed for a newfangled purpose: protecting the oper- ators of unmanned aircraft from liability in case of collision, technical problems, or any other sort of situation that could cause damage either to people or property on the ground. AIG offers optional coverage for "spoofing": when a hacker hijacks your drone remotely. Commercial use of drone aircraft, which will take place over the next decade, is expected to shake up industries ranging from motion pictures to agriculture to energy.
  56. 56. TRENDS AND AREAS OF DEVELOPMENT IN INSURTECH IoT is improving insurtech and healthtech Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (KPCB): 2015 was a very important year for wear- ables as the market took several important steps. After the hardware matures, the innovation moves to software and services. Over the next ten years, we can imagine a world where instead of wearing a smart- band or smartwatch to track activity and heart rate, we could just put on our favor- ite shirt. The buttons on that shirt would capture data from our bodies and source power from the ambient environment. Software and services would tell us when to hydrate, when to get out under the sun, when to take it easy, and when best to sleep. That’s the pervasive computing world of the future. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reported that approximately 500 million smartphone users around the world will be using a mobile medical app this year. This number is expected to grow to 1.7 billion smartphone and tablet users by 2018. Gartner projects there will be 6.4 billion connected things in use worldwide in 2016 (a 30 percent increase from 2015), and that the market will grow to 20.8 billion by 2020.
  57. 57. BAASIS, having a Fidor Tech license for Asia Pacific region, will use FidorOS technology to build a BaaS-platform, which has a proven track record in Europe, UK, US and Middle-East and now is expanding to Asia BAASIS is lead by team of InspirAsia, a leading fintech-accelerator in Singapore, which redesigned it’s program and strategy to build a bank-as-a-service platform and accelerate fintech startups based on it’s APIs, localize & customize Fidor’s solution to address needs and demand of Asian customers. BAASIS is seed funded by Life.SREDA VC, a leading fintech investor in Asia a globally BAASIS is a joint venture, launched by Life.SREDA VC and InspirAsia, leading fintech investor and accelerator in Asia respectively, and Fidor, state-of-the-art digital bank and API/bank-as-a-service provider Meet BAASIS: first pan-Asian API-based bank-as-a-service platform N e w Z e alan d In su rtech M id d lew are
  58. 58. TOP 3 COUNTRIES TOP 5 COUNTRIES Bankers Developers Customers Fintechs Regulatorsdownloads subscribes www.bank-as-a-service.com 5000 visitors “Money of the Future” Fintech research 800-1200 visitors per day 35 000visitors per month +1000-1500 new visitors monthly www.lifesreda.com/MoneyOfTheFuture_1H2016.pdf 28% 7% 3% 1% 61% Main trends and analytics for 1H 2016 19787 USA UK Singapore 22% 11% 11% 10% 4% TOP 5 COUNTRIES DOWNLOADS FOR THE FIRST 14 DAYS AFTER PUBLISHING Our thoughts do matter www.fintechranking.com
  59. 59. Get the full version of the “Money of the Future” fintech research at www.fintech-research.com
  60. 60. Vladislav Solodkiy Life.SREDA, Managing Partner most influential fintech persons in the world @SlavaSolodkiy www.lifesreda.com/VladislavSolodkiy 35

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