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Understanding better your project team dynamics and unlocking their full potential

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This session focuses on exploring personality in project teams. Throughout the session we will work together to increase your understanding of personality type by learning about the Myers-Briggs® framework and developing a greater self-awareness and awareness of others. We will also identify ways to use personality differences constructively to improve team performance and communication.

This session is relevant to anyone who is looking to increase their leadership capacity as a project manager.



Speaker

Yuliya Kondratenko, MA, PMP

For the past four years, Yuliya Kondratenko MA, PMP has managed various projects developing and executing student-centric service solutions at a large comprehensive institution. Most recently, Yuliya has joined SpokenWeb project at Concordia University, a long-term project involving multiple institutional and community partners with a goal of developing a nationally conceived archive of poetry events.

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Understanding better your project team dynamics and unlocking their full potential

  1. 1. 1 Yuliya Kondratenko, MA, PMP Project Manager, SpokenWeb, Concordia University MBTI® Certified Practitioner UNDERSTANDING PROJECT TEAM DYNAMICS
  2. 2. Why are we here? 1. Increase your understanding of personality type by learning about the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator ® framework 2. Develop greater self-awareness and awareness of others 3. Identify ways to use personality differences constructively to improve personal interactions and project team performance 2
  3. 3. Agenda Learn about Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®) Instrument and self-assessment Apply knowledge of Type in a team context 3
  4. 4. What is a project team? Temporary Functional (specialized experts) Has Strategic objective(s) Triggers change 4
  5. 5. Stakeholder Analysis Surface-level diversity Deep-level diversity 5
  6. 6. Personality vs. Behaviour Personality • The innate ways we think, feel, and act on most occasions • Inborn characteristics that are enduring and trans- situational • The core of who we are Behaviour • Observable acts • The result of a complex mix of factors 6
  7. 7. MBTI® Theory Stems from the work of psychoanalyst Carl Jung Katharine C. Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers developed Jung’s theory 7
  8. 8. Preferences Innate (nature) Shaped by our environment (nurture) 8
  9. 9. “Handedness” Activity 9
  10. 10. MBTI® Indicates possible preferences (8) organized into 4 dichotomies Use them all at one time (but not with equal comfort or confidence) 10
  11. 11. Who uses MBTI® Most Fortune 100 companies use it The most widely used personality assessment in the world—more than 2 million people worldwide each year Translated into two dozen+ languages Used in 70+ different countries 11 Source: Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type (7th ed.), I. B. Myers, p. 5.
  12. 12. Introversion-Extraversion How people direct and receive energy 12 Source: Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type (7th ed.), I. B. Myers, p. 5.
  13. 13. E • Are energized by interacting with others • Are sociable and expressive • Prefer to communicate by talking • Work out ideas by talking them through I • Are energized by opportunity to reflect • Are private and contained • Prefer to communicate in writing • Work out ideas by reflecting on them 13 Source: Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type (7th ed.), I. B. Myers, p. 5.
  14. 14. E • Have broad interests in many things • Learn best through doing or discussing • Readily take initiative in work and relationships I • Focus in depth on a few interests • Learn best by reflection, mental “practice • Take initiative selectively—when the situation or issue is very important to them 14 Source: Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type (7th ed.), I. B. Myers, p. 5.
  15. 15. Self-Assessment 15
  16. 16. Situating Extraversion/Introversion in a project team context 16
  17. 17. Preferences in Action Soliciting input in a team meeting Creating stimulating environment 17
  18. 18. Sensing-Intuition How people take in information 18 Source: Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type (7th ed.), I. B. Myers, p. 5.
  19. 19. S • Focus on present realities, verifiable facts, and experience • Focus on what is real and actual • Observe and remember specifics N • Focus on future possibilities, the big picture, and insights • Focus on the patterns and meanings in data • Remember specifics when they relate to a pattern 19 Source: Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type (7th ed.), I. B. Myers, p. 5.
  20. 20. S • Trust experience • Build carefully and thoroughly toward conclusions • Understand ideas and theories through practical applications N • Trust inspiration • Move quickly to conclusions, follow hunches • Want to clarify ideas and theories before putting them into practice 20 Source: Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type (7th ed.), I. B. Myers, p. 5.
  21. 21. Self-Assessment 21
  22. 22. Situating Sensing/Intuition in a project team context 22
  23. 23. Preferences in Action Incorporating different perspectives • Problem Solving • Decision Making 23
  24. 24. Thinking-Feeling Opposite Ways To Decide And Come To Conclusions 24 Source: Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type (7th ed.), I. B. Myers, p. 6.
  25. 25. T • Like to decide things by looking at the logical consequences of their choice or action • Step back to get an objective view • Analyze • Use cause-and-effect reasoning F • Like to decide things by considering what’s important to them and to others involved • Step in to identify with those involved • Empathize • Are guided by personal and social values 25 Source: Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type (7th ed.), I. B. Myers, p. 6.
  26. 26. T • Solve problems with logic • Strive for an objective standard of truth • Are reasonable • Can be “tough-minded” • Are fair—want everyone treated equally F • Assess impacts of decisions on people • Strive for understanding, harmony, and positive interactions • Are compassionate • May appear “tenderhearted” • Are fair—want everyone treated as an individual 26 Source: Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type (7th ed.), I. B. Myers, p. 6.
  27. 27. Self-Assessment 27
  28. 28. Situating Thinking /Feeling in a project team context 28
  29. 29. Preferences in Action Approach to decision making Handling differences Carrying out decisions 29
  30. 30. Judging-Perceiving Opposite Ways To Organize The External World 30 Source: Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type (7th ed.), I. B. Myers, p. 6.
  31. 31. J • Want the external world to be organized and orderly • Look at the world and see decisions that need to be made • Scheduled P • Seek to experience the world, not organize it • Look at the world and see options that need to be explored • Spontaneous • Flexible 31 Source: Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type (7th ed.), I. B. Myers, p. 6.
  32. 32. J • Organize their lives • Systematic • Methodical • Make short- and long-term plans and then follow them • Like to have things decided • Try to avoid last-minute stress P • Casual • Open ended • Adapt, change course • Like to keep things loose and are open to change • Find last-minute pressures energizing 32 Source: Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type (7th ed.), I. B. Myers, p. 6.
  33. 33. Self-Assessment 33
  34. 34. Situating Judging-Perceiving in a project team context 34
  35. 35. Preferences in Action Managing deadlines Responding to change Organizing large tasks 35
  36. 36. Personality Type 36 Source: Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type (7th ed.), I. B. Myers
  37. 37. 16 Personality Types 37 Source: Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type (7th ed.), I. B. Myers
  38. 38. Team Dynamics Become aware of differences Acknowledge the value of differences Practice new behaviours, seek out people who are different Incorporate different perspectives into interactions, decision-making, change management strategies 38
  39. 39. 39

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