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Hypnosis 
Brought to you by
Dr. Franz Anton Mesmer 
 Austrian physician 
 Late 18th century 
 Discovered what he called “____________________” 
– t...
James Braid 
 Developed procedure known as “hypnosis” in 1842 
 Created the “mesmeric trance” 
– movement of a bright ob...
1880s and Later Uses of Hypnosis 
 Dr. James Esdaile: used hypnotism as an 
anesthetic for over 300 surgeries 
 Jean Mar...
Dissociation 
 ____________________: a psychological state in which 
certain emotions, thoughts, memories, or sensations ...
Suggestibility 
 Theodore X. Barber: 
– views hypnosis as “ a more generalized ‘trait’, or a relatively 
permanent charac...
Definition of Hypnosis 
 American Psychological Association: 
– “Hypnosis typically involves an introduction to the 
proc...
The Process 
 Different hypnotists have different methods but they all 
follow some general guidelines: 
– The subject mu...
Trance Induction Methods 
 ____________________ Induction or Eye Fixation: 
– e.g., waving a watch in front of someone 
–...
Trance Induction Methods 
 Progressive relaxation and Imagery: 
– Basic Idea: Speak to the subject slowly in a _________ ...
Hypnotherapy 
 Therapy based on or using some form of 
hypnosis. 
 More effective with __________________ 
patients. 
 ...
Hypnotherapy 
 Despite some controversy over the 
nature of hypnosis and even its use, 
there is significant evidence tha...
How does Hypnotherapy Work? 
 The first step is for a clinician to put the 
patient into a trance-like state, then… 
 Su...
Practical Applications for Hypnotherapy 
 Cessation of ____________ 
 Treatment of pain, including chronic back 
pain, b...
Belief in Hypnotherapy 
 As with any other treatment, hypnotherapy will be 
less effective for those patients ___________...
Hypnotherapy 
 Many medical professionals are unaware of the 
benefits of hypnotherapy. 
 Several scholarly journals pub...
Negative Consequences 
A number of negative side effects have been 
associated with hypnotherapy… 
 Headaches 
 ________...
Negative Consequences (ctd.) 
 A rare number of cases exist in which legal action 
has been brought about as a result of ...
Preventing Negative Consequences 
Clinicians can reduce negative consequences by… 
 Not hypnotizing patients with major p...
This platform has been started by Parveen 
Kumar Chadha with the vision that nobody 
should suffer the way he has suffered...
Our views have increased the 
mark of the 30,000 
 Thank you viewers 
 Looking forward for franchise, 
collaboration, pa...
Contact Us:- 
011-25464531, 011-41425180, 011- 
+91-9818308353,+69612-17387 
Brought to you by 
othermotherindia@g9m8a1i8l...
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Hypnosis

Hypnosis

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Hypnosis

  1. 1. Hypnosis Brought to you by
  2. 2. Dr. Franz Anton Mesmer  Austrian physician  Late 18th century  Discovered what he called “____________________” – the belief that all animals had a special magnetic fluid flowing through their bodies and illness was simply an obstacle that temporarily stopped this flow – also known as mesmerism – theory was rejected by officials from the Royal Academy of Sciences Franz Anton Mesmer. (2005 October 17). Retrieved October 24, 2005 from http://enwikipedia.org/wiki/Franz_Mesmer. Brought to you by
  3. 3. James Braid  Developed procedure known as “hypnosis” in 1842  Created the “mesmeric trance” – movement of a bright object to achieve _____________ – proposed “ocular fixation” caused a trance Hypnosis. (2005 October 17). Retrieved October 24, 2005 from http://enwikipedia.org/wiki/Hypnosis. Brought to you by
  4. 4. 1880s and Later Uses of Hypnosis  Dr. James Esdaile: used hypnotism as an anesthetic for over 300 surgeries  Jean Martin Charcot: used hypnotism for treatment of __________  Sigmund Freud: developed abreaction therapy using hypnosis  Andrew Salter: combined hypnosis with Pavlovian conditioning Hypnosis. (2005 October 17). Retrieved October 24, . 2005 from http://enwikipedia.org/wiki/Hypnosis. Brought to you by
  5. 5. Dissociation  ____________________: a psychological state in which certain emotions, thoughts, memories, or sensations are separated from the rest of the body  e.g., being captivated by a book or movie  Joseph Barber and Ernest Hilgard: – view hypnosis as “an altered ‘state’ of consciousness in which a person’s stream of consciousness is divided or dissociated” Dissociation. (2005 October 17). Retrieved October 24, 2005 from http://enwikipedia.org/wiki/Dissociation Brought to you by
  6. 6. Suggestibility  Theodore X. Barber: – views hypnosis as “ a more generalized ‘trait’, or a relatively permanent characteristic of people who respond well to suggestion”  Considered easily suggestible if readily _______________ and _____________ suggestions made from other  The more suggestible you are, the more hypnotizable you are  Can be measured with tests such as the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale – Set of exercises that score a subject on their level of reaction to a stimulus after being placed in a trance Suggestibility. (2005 October 17). Retrieved October 24, 2005 from http://enwikipedia.org/wiki/Suggestibility. Brought to you by
  7. 7. Definition of Hypnosis  American Psychological Association: – “Hypnosis typically involves an introduction to the procedure during which the subject is told that suggestions for imaginative experiences will be presented.”  Hypnosis is not a form of ___________ (the subject is alert the whole time)  Most often compared to daydreaming, in that imaginary events seem real and can even cause emotions Definition of the Process of Hypnosis and Trance States. (2005 October 17). Retrieved October 24, 2005 from http: //apmha.com/page 8.htm. Brought to you by
  8. 8. The Process  Different hypnotists have different methods but they all follow some general guidelines: – The subject must want to be hypnotized. – The subject must believe he or she can be hypnotized. – The subject must eventually feel _________________ and relaxed.  Subject is put into a trance, or an altered state of consciousness, and then given suggestions by the hypnotist How Hypnosis Works. Retrieved October 24, 2005. http://science.howstuffworks.com/hypnosis.htm. Brought to you by
  9. 9. Trance Induction Methods  ____________________ Induction or Eye Fixation: – e.g., waving a watch in front of someone – Basic Idea: the subject focuses so intently on the object that everything else is tuned out – Rarely used because it rarely works  Rapid: – Basic Idea: give the brain a large number of firm commands at once – If the commands are forceful enough, the subject is likely to submit their conscious control over their actions – Works well for stage-hypnotists How Hypnosis Works. Retrieved October 24, 2005. http://science.howstuffworks.com/hypnosis.htm. Brought to you by
  10. 10. Trance Induction Methods  Progressive relaxation and Imagery: – Basic Idea: Speak to the subject slowly in a _________ voice until the subject experiences complete relaxation – Most commonly used by psychiatrists  Loss of balance – Basic Idea: Use slow, rhythmic rocking to create a loss of equilibrium – e.g., rocking a baby to sleep How Hypnosis Works. Retrieved October 24, 2005. http://science.howstuffworks.com/hypnosis.htm. Brought to you by
  11. 11. Hypnotherapy  Therapy based on or using some form of hypnosis.  More effective with __________________ patients.  More effective when coupled with additional treatment, such as cognitive or behavioral therapy. Brought to you by
  12. 12. Hypnotherapy  Despite some controversy over the nature of hypnosis and even its use, there is significant evidence that hypnotherapy is more effective than a placebo at dealing with a variety of health-related issues. Brought to you by
  13. 13. How does Hypnotherapy Work?  The first step is for a clinician to put the patient into a trance-like state, then…  Suggestions are made to alter the patient’s train of thought.  Metaphors are told that the patient internalizes.  Questions are asked to draw out memories. Edmunds, Gafner (2003) Touching Trauma. Journal of Contemporary Hypnosis. Brought to you by
  14. 14. Practical Applications for Hypnotherapy  Cessation of ____________  Treatment of pain, including chronic back pain, burn pain, cancer-related pain, childbirth pain, dental pain, surgery-related pain, and phantom limb pain  Treatment of general anxiety, disease-related anxiety, and PTSD  Treatment of phobias  Treatment of _____________ disorders Brought to you by
  15. 15. Belief in Hypnotherapy  As with any other treatment, hypnotherapy will be less effective for those patients _______________ of the process of hypnosis, or its potential medical benefits.  In most cases, effectiveness of hypnotherapy is correlated with the patients suggestibility level.  A recent study has shown suggestibility to be negatively correlated with academic achievement. West, V (2003). Hypnotic Suggestibility and Academic Achievement. Journal of Contemporary Hypnosis Brought to you by
  16. 16. Hypnotherapy  Many medical professionals are unaware of the benefits of hypnotherapy.  Several scholarly journals publish articles only related to hypnotherapy, including…  Journal of Contemporary Hypnosis  International Journal of Experimental and Clinical Hypnosis  American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis Brought to you by
  17. 17. Negative Consequences A number of negative side effects have been associated with hypnotherapy…  Headaches  __________  Neck Pain  Reliving traumatic life experiences Lynn et al. (2000)The Systematic Study of negative post-hypnotic effects. Journal of Contemporary Hypnosis Brought to you by
  18. 18. Negative Consequences (ctd.)  A rare number of cases exist in which legal action has been brought about as a result of hypnosis (usually stage hypnosis).  Plaintiffs have claimed that being stage hypnotized resulted in depression, sexual dysfunction, and even psychosocial disorders.  Although not all claims are validated, these cases raise important issues on the potential dangers of hypnosis. Brought to you by
  19. 19. Preventing Negative Consequences Clinicians can reduce negative consequences by…  Not hypnotizing patients with major psychological disorders  Dispelling common myths about hypnosis  Explaining possible after-effects of hypnosis  Conducting a thorough _________________ Page, Handley (1993) The Effects of Preventive Measures in reducing aftereffects of hypnosis. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis Brought to you by
  20. 20. This platform has been started by Parveen Kumar Chadha with the vision that nobody should suffer the way he has suffered because of lack and improper healthcare facilities in India. We need lots of funds manpower etc. to make this vision a reality please contact us. Join us as a member for a noble cause.. Brought to you by
  21. 21. Our views have increased the mark of the 30,000  Thank you viewers  Looking forward for franchise, collaboration, partners. Brought to you by
  22. 22. Contact Us:- 011-25464531, 011-41425180, 011- +91-9818308353,+69612-17387 Brought to you by othermotherindia@g9m8a1i8l.5c6o9m476 www.other-mother.in Saxbee Consultants Details :-www.parveenchadha.com https://cparveen.wix.com/other-mother https://twitter.com/othermotherindi http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=326103341&trk=nav_responsive_tab_profile https://www.facebook.com/pages/Other-Mother-Nursing-Crusade/224235031114989?ref=hl A WORLDWIDE MISSITION JOIN US

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