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Tpm basic

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Total productive maintenance basics

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Tpm basic

  1. 1. 1 Thank You For Not Smoking
  2. 2. 2 PLANT, MACHINE, OFFICE LAYOUT PEOPLE SUPPORTIVE PRACTICE QUICK SET-UP TOTAL PRODUCTIVE MAINTENANCE CONTAINER -IZATION/ TRANSPOR- TATION SUPPLIER DEVELOPMENT LEVELING/ SMALL LOT LEAD TIME REDUCTION WPO & VISUAL MANAGEMENT PROCESS CAPABILITY SIX SIGMA 20 KEYS ERROR PROOFING EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT/ WHITE SHIRT Pull System
  3. 3. 3 TPM STRATEGIES Six Supporting Strategies To TPM Loss Elimination Operator Autonomous Maintenance Initial Control System Zero Defects Education And Training Planned Maintenance System
  4. 4. 4 What Do The Following Slides Have In Common ?
  5. 5. 5
  6. 6. 6 L i n u m f l a v u m l .
  7. 7. 7
  8. 8. 8
  9. 9. 9
  10. 10. 10
  11. 11. 11
  12. 12. 12 What Did The Previous Slides Have In Common ? All Pictures Show Owner Involvement In Maintenance or Restoring Processes
  13. 13. 13 A support process for AMPS. Upgrading and improving equipment. A people skill building and training process. Part of daily activities. TPM . . . . . What It Is
  14. 14. 14 Why Do We Need TPM ?? . . . . To Support AMPS  Competition  Current Condition  JIT
  15. 15. 15 What Is The Origin Of Total Productive Maintenance ? United States - Henry Ford - Preventive Maintenance Japan - Nippon Denso - Productive Maintenance From: To:
  16. 16. 16 What Does TPM Stand For ? Includes: T Total Total Production System P Productive Perfect M Maintenance Management, System Control
  17. 17. 17 A set of activities for restoring equipment to its optimal condition and changing the work environment to maintain those conditions through daily maintenance activities. Definition:
  18. 18. 18 To restructure the corporate culture through behavioral changes and equipment improvements. TEAR DOWN THE WALL Objective:
  19. 19. 19 To upgrade the capabilities of all company members through education, training, and participation. Intent: TPM
  20. 20. 20 L O S S To identify productivity losses and involve all members of the company in loss elimination programs. Purpose:
  21. 21. 21 What Are The Benefits For YOU?  Safe Work Environment  Job Security  Improved Quality  Increased Productivity  Improved Skills
  22. 22. 22 PLANT, MACHINE, OFFICE LAYOUT PEOPLE SUPPORTIVE PRACTICE QUICK SET-UP TOTAL PRODUCTIVE MAINTENANCE CONTAINER -IZATION/ TRANSPOR- TATION SUPPLIER DEVELOPMENT LEVELING/ SMALL LOT LEAD TIME REDUCTION WPO & VISUAL MANAGEMENT PROCESS CAPABILITY SIX SIGMA 20 KEYS ERROR PROOFING EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT/ WHITE SHIRT Pull System
  23. 23. 23 TPM is a Team Effort Team AM Begins and works it’s way through all employees including the New Hire of Today. Smaller Teams are Taking over Responsibilities Once Handled Exclusively by Managers and Supervisors.
  24. 24. 24 TPM Class Make-up All Shifts Of Production Operators Unit Maintenance/Tool Personnel Unit Management Plant Management
  25. 25. 25
  26. 26. 26 Photo Of Operators In Initial Clean-Up
  27. 27. 27 Photo From President’s Clean- Up
  28. 28. 28 Current Conditions To Improve: Oil Socks Around Machines Workplace Organization
  29. 29. 29
  30. 30. 30
  31. 31. 31
  32. 32. 32
  33. 33. 33 Current Conditions To Improve: Oil Socks Around Machines Workplace Organization
  34. 34. 34
  35. 35. 35
  36. 36. 36
  37. 37. 37
  38. 38. 38 What Can Be Expected? Productivity: Value added improvement 1.5 to 2 times. 40% reduction in breakdowns. Overall equipment efficiency up 1.5 to 2 times Quality: Reduction in Work-In-Process (WIP) defects. Reduction in Parts Per Million (PPM). Cost: Production costs reduced by 30%. Quality cost reduced by 30%.
  39. 39. 39 What Can Be Expected? Safety & Morale: Zero accidents. 5 -- 10 suggestions per employee. Education: Skill upgrading of employees. Delivery: Reduced finished goods inventory by 50%. 100% on-time delivery. Reduced premium freight by 60%.
  40. 40. 40 Comparison Of Key Indicators Before / After AMPS / TPM Indicator Before After AMPS After TPM Labor As A % Of Sales Scrap As A % Of COS Finished Goods Inventory Cost Of Quality Parts Per Million Delivery 28.9% 5% 5 Days 15% 2500 98% 21.2% 1.5% 1.2 Days 5.6% 37 100 % 18 % 0.7% 0.5 Days 4.0% 7 100 %
  41. 41. 41 Corrective Preventive Predictive 55.00% 15.00% 8.00% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Corrective Maintenance Technology, Inc. 1992 “Maintenance personnel in half of U.S. plants spend 50% of their time fixing problems instead of preventing them.”
  42. 42. 42 Equipment Failure Statistic 37% Of Equipment Failures Are Due To Poor Lubrication Management Source: JIPM Other Equip. Failures 63.0% Lubrication Method 13.0% Lack Of Lubricant 24.0%
  43. 43. 43 Equipment Failure Statistic 12% Of Equipment Failures Are Due To Dirt And Poor Clean-Up Habits Other Equip. Failures 51% Dirt 12% Lubrication Method 13% Lack Of Lubricant 24% Source: JIPM
  44. 44. 44 TPM Measurements :  Downtime  Planned  Unplanned  Changeover Time  Equipment Check Time  Clean-up Time  # of Equipment Failures  Minor Stoppages  Maintenance Costs  Accidents  Defect Rate
  45. 45. 45 MEASUREMENTS In-Company Defect Cost Rate Delivery Rate '90/9 '91/3 '91/9 '92/3 '92/9 '93/3 '93/9 80 85 90 95 8 Point s Percent, % Better '90/9 '91/3 '91/9 '92/3 '92/9 '93/3 '93/9 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1 - 3 PPM Better
  46. 46. 46 32 Times Improvement Suggestions 1990 1991 1992 1993 0 1 2 3 4 5 1990 1991 1992 1993 0 20 40 60 80 100Suggestions/YearAccidents/Year Accidents MEASUREMENTS Better Better
  47. 47. 47
  48. 48. 48
  49. 49. 49
  50. 50. 50 VIDEO INTRODUCTION TO TPM
  51. 51. 51 BREAK ? BREAK !!! BREAK!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  52. 52. 52 EDUCATION
  53. 53. 53 What Are Skills? The ability to respond to a situation, without any hesitation, based on prior experience and training.
  54. 54. 54 Levels Of Skills Level 0 Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Do Not Know Know The Theory Can Do To Some Degree Can Do With Confidence Can Teach To Others Lack Of Knowledge Lack Of Training Lack Of Training Learned By Doing Knows Extremely Well
  55. 55. 55 Ability Needed From Operators  Ability To Find & Improve Equipment Problems  Understanding Of Equipment Functions  Understand The Relation Between Equipment & Quality  Can Replace Consumable Parts  Good Team Member
  56. 56. 56 Ability Needed From Maintenance Group  Can Teach The Proper Operation & Daily Maintenance of Equipment  Judge If Equipment Is Operating Normally Or Abnormally  Respond To An Abnormal Condition, Select, & Implement A Timely Repair  Technical Skills To Diagnose Equipment & Prevent Breakdowns
  57. 57. 57 TPM One Point Lesson No. Team Leader Super- visor Unit Manager Prepared By: Date Executed Teacher Student ACTUAL RESULTS Theme Category Date Of Preparation Trouble Cases Kaizen Cases Basic Knowledg e
  58. 58. 58 TPM One Point Lesson 1. Basic Knowledge General information that everyone needs to know. This sheet is used to confirm that everyone understands an item the same way.
  59. 59. 59 TPM One Point Lesson No. Team Leader Super- visor Unit Manager Prepared By: Date Executed Teacher Student ACTUAL RESULTS Theme Category Date Of Preparation Trouble Cases Kaizen Cases Basic Knowledg e Visual Control 223 5-Feb. 2002 X KF DR MA CR 3-5 KF SB Full oil level Low oil level Site Gage for hydraulic fluid: Oil must stay within the “Full” And “Low” level lines. - - - - - Current level
  60. 60. 60 2. Kaizen Cases This category is used to document improvement cases that have been completed. This sheet will benefit other teams for possible implementation on their lines. TPM One Point Lesson
  61. 61. 61 TPM One Point Lesson No. Team Leader Super- visor Unit Manager Prepared By: Date Executed Teacher Student ACTUAL RESULTS Theme Category Date Of Preparation Trouble Cases Kaizen Cases Basic Knowledg e Error Proofing 235 5-Mar. 2002 KF DR MA CR 3-5 KF SB X Before condition: Forgetting to clamp flange in place. Improved condition: Added a locator switch to insure clamps are holding flange in place. Flange Clamp Clamp Locator Switch
  62. 62. 62 3. Trouble Cases trouble with a piece of equipment, and what was done to solve the problem. This category is very helpful if a past problem occurs again and it is difficult This category is used to document to remember how it was repaired. TPM One Point Lesson
  63. 63. 63 TPM One Point Lesson No. Team Leader Super- visor Unit Manager Prepared By: Date Executed Teacher Student ACTUAL RESULTS Theme Category Date Of Preparation Trouble Cases Kaizen Cases Basic Knowledg e Tool Brealage 255 5-Jun. 2002 KF DR MA CR 6-5 KF SB X Before Condition: Frequent arbor breakage Improved Condition: Relocated key Arbor Arbor Key ---- Break Key
  64. 64. 64 TPM Training Outline Program Overview At Work Team Meetings Introduction , Loss Elimination, Education & Training Operator Autonomous Maintenance (Steps 1-3) Operator Autonomous Maintenance (Steps 4-7), Planned Maintenance, Zero Defects, Initial Control System Class # 2 : Class # 4 : Class # 1 : Class # 3 :
  65. 65. 65 Step #4 Upon completion of the 3rd Step, the team will participate in the TPM Step #4 classes. This will lead the team into the individual support classes for the various machine elements. The team will study the elements on the following slide.
  66. 66. 66 Outside Source Support Training OIL Screws, Bolts, & Fasteners Equipment Safety Lubrication Hydraulics Pneumatics Drive Systems Electrical Systems Machine Systems
  67. 67. 67 VIDEO PARADIGMS
  68. 68. 68 LOSS ELIMINATION
  69. 69. 69 Breakdowns & Defects Can Be Divided Into 2 Loss Categories 2. Chronic Loss: 1. Sporadic Loss: Defects suddenly occur, or a piece of equipment suddenly stops. The root cause is usually easy to locate. This type of loss does not occur suddenly. There is usually more than one type of cause to the loss, which makes the root cause difficult to locate.
  70. 70. 70 Why Chronic Losses Remain Unsolved Aware Unaware A B C Counter- measures Taken Unable To Take Neces- sary Action No Counter- measures Taken Only temporary countermeasures No drastic countermeasures Generation of chronic losses overlooked (Such chronic losses as minor stoppage, speed, rework and start-up are most likely to be ignored.) Almost Giving Up Chronic Loss Loss not recognized Loss is under-estimated No quantitative evaluation No satisfactory results No sign of improvement
  71. 71. 71 Chronic Loss Causes Cause Cause Cause Cause Cause Cause Cause Cause (Single Cause) (Several Causes)(Combinations Of Several Causes) Understanding The Cause It is difficult to focus on and understand causes.
  72. 72. 72 Before Clean-Up Photo
  73. 73. 73 Before Clean-Up Photo
  74. 74. 74 Chronic Losses Are Generated By The Lack Of Equipment Reliability  Design  Manufacturing  Installation  Operation  Maintenance
  75. 75. 75 What Are Slight Defects?  Problems which cannot be detected easily.  Problems that are not considered to greatly contribute to defects or failures.
  76. 76. 76 Photo Of Shavings On Bender
  77. 77. 77 Why Should A High Priority Be Placed On Slight Defects?  Stop the snowball effect of accumulating defects.  To get to the root cause.  Slight defects will develop into critical defects.  Forced deterioration will shorten the life span of the equipment.
  78. 78. 78 2 Types Of Equipment Deterioration Natural Deterioration: Physical wear that occurs even though the equipment is used and maintained properly. Forced Deterioration: Natural deterioration that is increased from negligence on our part, such as lack of oiling, checking, repairing, etc.
  79. 79. 79 Photo Of A Bar Leaning On A Machine
  80. 80. 80 Latent Defects  Hidden causes of problems  Seeds Are . . . .
  81. 81. 81 2 Types Of Latent Defects Psychological: Physical:  Not Visible  Need To Disassemble  Hidden Behind  Covered By Dust, Stains, Etc.  Left Ignored Because Of Lack of Interest Or Skill  Operator & Maintenance Indifference  Not Familiar With The Defect  Error In Judgement Of The Defect
  82. 82. 82 2 Types Of Failures Function Stoppage: Failure causing the equipment to stop completely. Function Deterioration: Equipment function is not fully utilized and is beginning to malfunction by minor stoppages.
  83. 83. 83 Concept Of Zero Failure We must change our way of thinking to realize that the equipment can be protected from failure. Equipment Failure
  84. 84. 84 Rules For Zero Failure Discover latent defects to prevent failures “Failure” is only the tip of the iceberg FAILURE LATENT DEFECTS Dust, soiling, adhesion of raw materials. Abrasion, backlash, looseness, leaks Corrosion, deformation, flaws, cracks Temperature, vibration, sound, and other errors
  85. 85. 85 How To Eliminate Failures To Zero Establish Basic Conditions Maintain Operating Conditions Restore Equipment From A Deteriorated State Improve Weak Points Of Design Upgrade The Skill Level 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
  86. 86. 86 5 Countermeasures For Zero Failures And 5 TPM Principles 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Establish Basic Conditions Keep Operating Conditions Improve Weak Points In Design Improve The Skill Level Education And Training Loss Elimination Planned Maintenance Initial Flow Control Of Equipment Operator Autonomous Maintenance Restore Equipment From A Deteriorated State
  87. 87. 87 16 Major Losses Which Obstruct Production Efficiency  5 Major Losses Obstructing Manpower Efficiency  3 Major Losses Obstructing Material & Energy Utilization  8 Major Losses Obstructing Equipment Efficiency
  88. 88. 88 5 Major Losses Obstructing Manpower Efficiency: 1. Management Loss 2. Operating Motion Loss 3. Line Organization Loss 4. Logistics Loss 5. Measurement & Adjustment Loss 16 Major Losses - continued
  89. 89. 89 3 Major Losses Obstructing Material & Energy Utilization: 1. Energy Loss 2. Die, Tool, & Fixture Loss 3. Material Loss 16 Major Losses - continued
  90. 90. 90 1. Equipment Failure Loss: Largest failure of all losses. Two types: a. Function-Stoppage: Failure occurs unexpectedly b. Function-Deterioration: Decreases over time 2. Set-Up & Adjustment Loss Set-Up: Losses due to changeover Adjustment: Minor process adjustments 8 Major Losses Obstructing Equipment Efficiency: 16 Major Losses - continued
  91. 91. 91 3. Consumable Parts Change Loss: Weld tip, weld liners, cutting bits 4. Start-Up Loss: Equipment warm-up and stabilization 5. Minor Stoppage & Idling Loss: Losses we have a tendency to “put up with” - part hanging - pushing re-set button 8 Major Losses Obstructing Equipment Efficiency: 16 Major Losses - continued
  92. 92. 92 Photo Of Operator Pushing A Reset
  93. 93. 93 6. Speed Loss: Slowing the equipment down to produce good quality 7. Defect & Rework Loss: Time and manpower lost in both types 8. Shutdown Loss: Planned stoppage of equipment 16 Major Losses - continued 8 Major Losses Obstructing Equipment Efficiency:
  94. 94. 94 How Do We Plan To Realize Our Losses TPM Step To The Top With TPM
  95. 95. 95 TPM Measurements: Downtime # Of Equipment Failures  -- Planned  -- Unplanned Minor Stoppages Changeover Time Maintenance Costs Equipment Check Time Accidents Clean-up Time Defect Rate
  96. 96. 96 Downtime: Planned Scheduled production stoppage Unplanned Production stoppage due to equipment failure Measurement Details -- --
  97. 97. 97 Measurement Details Unplanned Downtime: --This category of downtime is made up of the 8 Major Losses Which Obstruct Equipment Efficiency.
  98. 98. 98 Measurement Details Planned Downtime: --This category is made up of scheduled production stoppages.
  99. 99. 99 Changeover Time: -- Time period from last good piece produced to the first good piece produced on the new part number safely. Measurement Details
  100. 100. 100 Equipment Check Time: -- The amount of time required to perform daily checks on the equipment. This time is from when the checks begin until all checks are complete on the cell Measurement Details
  101. 101. 101 Clean-up Time: -- The amount of time required to perform daily clean-up of the equipment and surrounding area Measurement Details
  102. 102. 102 # Of Equipment Failures: -- Total number of equipment failures on a cell during the shift Measurement Details
  103. 103. 103 Minor Stoppages: -- Number of equipment minor stoppages during the shift Measurement Details
  104. 104. 104 Maintenance Costs: -- Associated costs for maintaining the equipment on a line. These costs include all replacement parts cost and the labor required to replace the parts. Also included in these costs are the cleaning supplies to maintain the equipment Measurement Details
  105. 105. 105 Accidents: -- Number of accidents on a cell . . . . . . lost time and not lost time Measurement Details
  106. 106. 106 Defect Rate: --Defects generated by process Measurement Details
  107. 107. 107 TPM TRAINING Six Supporting Strategies To TPM Loss Elimination Operator Autonomous Maintenance Initial Control System Zero Defects Education And Training Planned Maintenance System
  108. 108. 108
  109. 109. 109 What Is Operator Autonomous Maintenance? Activities where each operator performs timely inspection, lubrication, consumable parts replacement, repair, troubleshooting, accuracy checks, etc. . . . . on their own equipment.
  110. 110. 110 What Is The Goal Of Operator Autonomous Maintenance? Keeping one's own equipment in good condition by oneself.
  111. 111. 111 Prevent Machine From Deteriorating Improve Weak Points In Design Establish Basic Conditions Keep Operation Conditions Operators Maintenance Management TPM Roles Of Improve Skill
  112. 112. 112 Activities Performed By The Operators  Prevent Deterioration  Measure Deterioration  Repair Deterioration
  113. 113. 113 Photo Of Repairing Problem
  114. 114. 114 Photo Of Repairing Problem
  115. 115. 115 Activities Of The Maintenance Group  Measure Deterioration  Repair Deterioration  Provide Guidance To Operators
  116. 116. 116 Maintenance Group Support To Operators In Steps 1 Thru 3 Training & Guidance In Equipment Structures & Functions Guidance On Lubrication Items Assistance In Locating Sources Of Contamination. Improvement To Hard-To-Access Areas Quick Response To Operator Requests 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
  117. 117. 117 PRELIMINARY STEP 0 Before starting the step method, the following should be done.  Consider safety education about the equipment  Revisit the Loss Elimination exercise
  118. 118. 118
  119. 119. 119
  120. 120. 120 Machine / Lock Photo
  121. 121. 121 VIDEO LOCK OUT TAG OUT
  122. 122. 122 STEP 1: Initial Clean-Up Cleaning Is Inspection: – Take pictures to show “Before Conditions” – Safety first – Thoroughly clean dirt accumulated over years – Open covers and guards to clean inside – Also clean the environment around the equipment – Cleaning becomes a normal part of the operator responsibility Using TPM Problem Tags:
  123. 123. 123 “Before” Photo Of Sizer
  124. 124. 124 “Before” Photo Of Sizer
  125. 125. 125
  126. 126. 126 “After” Photo Of Sizer
  127. 127. 127
  128. 128. 128 Photo Of Cleaning
  129. 129. 129
  130. 130. 130 Photo Of Cleaning
  131. 131. 131 STEP 1: Initial Clean-Up - continued Cleaning is Inspection: Using TPM Problem Tags: – Tags to be filled out by all operators – Attach tags to problem location – Each problem requires its own tag – BLUE TAG -- Operator responsible to repair – RED TAG -- Maintenance group responsible for – repairs TPM
  132. 132. 132 TPMAutonomous Maintenance Step. No. Problem Found Here 1 52 3 4 Equipment: :Asset No.: Date Found: Found By: Description of Problem: Page 1 REMOVE THIS SHEET AFTER ATTACHING TAG AND USE IT AS COPY TPMAutonomous Maintenance Step. No. Problem Found Here 1 52 3 4 Equipment: :Asset No.: Date Found: Found By: Description of Problem: Page 2 ATTACH THIS SHEET TO EQUIPMENT Description of Repair: Page 3 Date Repaired: Repair Made By: RETURN THIS TAG TO THE ORIGINATOR
  133. 133. 133
  134. 134. 134
  135. 135. 135
  136. 136. 136
  137. 137. 137 Tag History Upon completion of the repair, log or file tags for future reference. Keep the information at the cell. Red tag history highlights: Recurring problems Repair history Maintenance response Blue tag history highlights: Operator repairs and minor stoppages Recurring problems that need to be red tagged
  138. 138. 138 Photo Of Problem
  139. 139. 139 Photo Of Problem
  140. 140. 140 LUNCH !!! FOOD!!!!!!
  141. 141. 141 Floor Exercise 1 Initial Clean-up – 1. Participants will go to the designated cell – 2. Facilitators will assign participants to a specific piece of equipment or area – 3. Using the proper cleaning material and TPM tags the participants will clean the equipment and tag all problems. – Continued on next slide
  142. 142. 142 Floor Exercise 1 - continued 4. Upon Completion Of The Initial Clean-Up: a. Collect All Copies Of TPM Tags b. Take the Tags to the Training Room and Discuss the Tags and Problem Areas. Be Sure to Return the Tags to the Cell Discussion.
  143. 143. 143 Step 2 Counter Measures for Hard-to- Access & Source of Contamination
  144. 144. 144 Countermeasures For Hard-To- Access & Source of Contamination  Countermeasures For Hard-to-Access Areas  1. Relocate for better access  2. Lexan covers  3. Windows or guards  4. Fill unused or unnecessary holes/grooves – Note: Always use approved and permanent countermeasures.
  145. 145. 145 Countermeasures For Hard-To- Access & Source of Contamination - continued  Eliminate Sources That Make The Equipment Dirty. – 1. Repair or tag leaks – 2. Create ways to remove slag, shavings etc. – 3. Use filters where necessary – 4. Check for exhaust fan possibilities – 5. If the source can not be eliminated, contain the – source until it can be eliminated Note: Always use approved and permanent countermeasures.
  146. 146. 146 Source of Contamination “Before”
  147. 147. 147 Source of Contamination “After”
  148. 148. 148 Tree City Welder Before Improvement
  149. 149. 149 Tree City Welder After Improvement
  150. 150. 150 Steps In Preparing A Temporary Guard 1 2 3 Improvement Observe Line Think Of A Way To Control The Source Of Contamination Make A Model Using Corrugated Cardboard Try Fabricate Temporary Device Using Galvanized Steel Or Other Material Produce Final Device Suggest As Standardization And Future Design Information
  151. 151. 151 Temporary Guard Photo
  152. 152. 152 Hard-To-Access & Source Of Contamination Areas Equipment Name:____________________ Asset No.:____________________ Page No.:____________________ Type Item Cleaning, Lubrication, Inspection Counter- measure Who Found Who Responsible Completion HTA SOC Description Of Problem Target Actual
  153. 153. 153 Floor Exercise 2 Participants will be given the Hard to Access & Source of Contamination documents to fill out at the cell. Allow 30 minutes to complete this form. Return to the training room for the Report Out.
  154. 154. 154 Step 3 Prepare Temporary Standards
  155. 155. 155 Prepare Temporary Standards This step is to enhance the equipment reliability & maintainability.
  156. 156. 156 Prepare Temporary Standards - continued  Temporary Check Sheet For Clean-Up & Lubrication Standards: – What items need to be done – Who will perform the check – Where the location is to be checked – What to use for the inspection or cleaning – Target time to complete the task
  157. 157. 157 Prepare Temporary Standards - continued Gauges should be marked for high and low operating ranges. Points of lubrication should be marked and color coded for quick, accurate identification.
  158. 158. 158 Temporary Standard Check Sheet (Inspection, Cleaning, Lubrication) Sketch Line Machine Effective Period Team Leader Supervisor Unit Manager Year Month What To Do & Items UsedI.C.L.DescriptionNo.Zone Target TimeWho How Often A B C D E F G H I
  159. 159. 159 Sample Of Temporary Standard Check Sheet
  160. 160. 160 Sample Of Temporary Standard Check Sheet
  161. 161. 161 Floor Exercise 3 Participants will return to the floor and fill in a Temporary Standard Check Sheet. Return to the training room in 30 minutes for the Report Out.
  162. 162. 162 Implementation & Review
  163. 163. 163 TPM Requirement AMPS Review A M P S C H A M P I O N S
  164. 164. 164 “Our old, ineffective, hierarchical model will need to be replaced by the new empowerment model of putting critical thinking and decision-making skills into the hands of a fully educated work force”.
  165. 165. 165 Program Outline  Management Will Receive The Initial Training Of Each Class  Upon completing AMPS, The Work Team Will Begin TPM  Unit Management Will Assist In The Training  Review of Each Step Upon Completion  Support Classes on Machine Elements will be Taught to Operators. TPM Outline
  166. 166. 166 Key Points For Success In Implementation  Cooperation Between All Departments  Maintenance understanding and support  Led By Work Teams  Operator Input and Decision on Check Sheet Items  TPM Activities Become Part Of The Daily Routine
  167. 167. 167 Key Points For Success In Implementation (Continued)  Transmission Of Education  One Point Lesson Sheet  Standardization  Activities Board: Timing Chart One Point Lessons # Of Equipment Failures Defect Rate # Of Minor Stoppages Current Step In Progress Changeover Time Problem Tag Data "Before" & "After" Pictures Downtime Data Clean-up Time Equipment Check Time Maintenance Costs Accidents
  168. 168. 168  Quick Repair  TPM Meetings  Step System  Step Review  Promote Success Stories Key Points For Success In Implementation (Continued)
  169. 169. 169 7 Step Development For Operator Autonomous Maintenance Step 1: Step 2: Step 3: Step 4: Step 5: Step 6: Step 7: Initial Clean-Up Countermeasures For Hard- To-Access & Source Of Contamination Prepare Temporary Standards General Inspection Autonomous Inspection Standardization All-Out Autonomous Management Stage 1 Upgrading The Basic Conditions Of The Equipment Stage 2 Steps To Measure & Prevent Deterioration Stage 3 Steps To Expand OAM & Master The Maintenance Skills
  170. 170. 170 7 Step Development For Operator Autonomous Maintenance Step 1: Step 2: Step 3: Step 4: Step 5: Step 6: Step 7: Initial Clean-Up Countermeasures For Hard- To-Access & Source Of Contamination Prepare Temporary Standards General Inspection Autonomous Inspection Standardization All-Out Autonomous Management Stage 1 Upgrading The Basic Conditions Of The Equipment Stage 2 Steps To Measure & Prevent Deterioration Stage 3 Steps To Expand OAM & Master The Maintenance Skills
  171. 171. 171 TPM Training Outline Program Overview At Work Team Meetings Introduction , Loss Elimination, Education & Training Operator Autonomous Maintenance (Steps 1-3) Operator Autonomous Maintenance (Steps 4-7), Planned Maintenance, Zero Defects, Initial Control System Class # 2 : Class # 4 : Class # 1 : Class # 3 :
  172. 172. 172 TPM Implementation Steps 1, 2, & 3 8030LINE:__________ Mazda ExpressTEAM NAME____________ STEP MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE 1 2 3 6 13 20 27 3 10 17 24 1 8 15 22 29 5 12 19 26
  173. 173. 173 Autonomous Maintenance Review Upon completion of each step, the work teams will request a review of the step just completed. This review will allow team and managers to confirm whether the Autonomous Activities are being followed to their intent.
  174. 174. 174 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Operator Autonomous Maintenance 7 Steps Initial Clean-up Countermeasures for Hard-To-Access & Source Of Contamination Prepare Temporary Standards General Inspection Autonomous Inspection Standardization Aut. Mgt. T P M
  175. 175. 175 TPM STRATEGIES Six Supporting Strategies To TPM Loss Elimination Operator Autonomous Maintenance Initial Control System Zero Defects Education And Training Planned Maintenance System

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