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Defense mechanisms for etom powerpoint

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Defense Mechanisms
Defense Mechanisms
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Defense mechanisms for etom powerpoint

  1. 1. Defense Mechanisms Sometimes, wouldn’t burying your head in the sand be easier than facing reality?
  2. 2. Definition of Defense Mechanisms Defense Mechanisms are “ways of dealing with anxiety through unconsciously distorting one’s perception of reality.” -Ciccarelli & White, 2015 In other words, your ego: 1. Protects you from consciously experiencing anxiety by altering your reality 2. Alters reality at the unconscious level so that you are not aware that you are using a Defense Mechanism
  3. 3. The Freuds & Defense Mechanisms According to Sigmund Freud, Defense Mechanisms are employed by the Ego to reduce the conflict between the Id and the Superego. The Ego wants to reduce the conflict because when the Id and Superego are fighting, the person experiences anxiety. Sigmund Freud and his daughter, Anna, described eight unique Defense Mechanisms our egos use to reduce anxiety and discomfort. 1. Repression 2. Denial 3. Reaction Formation 4. Projection 5. Regression 6. Rationalization 7. Displacement 8. Sublimation
  4. 4. Repression Stressful, conflicting, or threatening events get pushed out of conscious awareness.  An adult who was abused in childhood cannot recall the abuse at all.  An adult witnessed their pet get struck by a car when they were a child but cannot remember witnessing the event.  A child accidentally pees their pants in front of their classmates; years later, the child cannot remember that embarrassing experience.  An unhappy spouse accidentally forgets their wedding anniversary each year.  An anxious student completely forgets about a big assignment that was due.
  5. 5. Denial Refusal to accept an unpleasant reality  A terminally ill patient says, “I’m not dying.”  A person who binge drinks daily says, “I don’t have a drinking problem.”  Parents of a child who has died deny the loss of the child by keeping the child’s room unchanged.
  6. 6. Reaction Formation Expressing a more socially accepted impulse that is the opposite of what the person truly feels or wants to express  Treating someone whom you intensely dislike as a friend  A person wants to express their sexual impulses but instead becomes a protester of pornography and sex before marriage.  A male is unconsciously attracted to another male but outwardly voices hatred of homosexuals.  A timid person shows how daring and brave they are.
  7. 7. Projection Attributing a disturbing impulse, attitude, or behavior to someone else  A person unconsciously hates a person but says, “I don’t hate him, he hates me.”  A woman is unconsciously attracted to her sister’s husband but denies this attraction and believes the husband is attracted to her.  A person unconsciously wants to steal from a store but instead accuses other people of stealing from the store.
  8. 8. Regression Falling back on childlike patterns as a way of coping with stressful situations  A 5 year old starts wetting the bed after his parents bring home a new baby.  An 10 year old starts sucking their thumb for comfort on the first day of school.  A husband starts whining and throwing a temper tantrum in front of their wife to be able to buy a video game.
  9. 9. Rationalization Making up acceptable excuses for unacceptable behavior  A person says, “I can have dessert because I saved room by skipping breakfast.”  A person gets fired from a job and says, “the job wasn’t a good one anyway.”  A person gets dumped by their partner and feels better by thinking about all the “faults” of the partner.  A person says, “everybody else does it, so I don’t have to feel guilty.”  A person binge-drinking alcohol says, “it’s OK, I drink just to be social.”
  10. 10. Displacement Expressing an impulse with a substitute object that is less threatening than the original target of the impulse  A person gets yelled at by their boss. The person goes home and gets angry and snaps at their partner.  A person receives an F on an exam and kicks their dog when they get home.  A teenager that’s angry with their father picks a fight with their younger brother.
  11. 11. Sublimation Turning socially unacceptable urges into socially acceptable behavior  A hostile, aggressive teenager channels their urges into learning mixed martial arts.  A person with sexual curiosity satisfies their urges by research sexual behaviors.  A person dumped by their partner writes a poem about the experience.
  12. 12. Defense Mechanisms Overview Notice what all of the Defense Mechanisms have in common…  All Defense Mechanisms distort reality and reduce anxiety so that we can function in our day-to-day lives.  If we faced the “truth” about many of hour urges and behaviors, we would continually be stressed.  The Ego and its use of Defense Mechanisms save us from that stress.  Remember that it is normal to use a mix of these Mechanisms  Now that you are familiar with the definitions and examples of each Mechanism, it’s time for you to practice working with the Mechanisms!

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