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How to Build
Self-Discipline
Faster and Easier.
Learn the Power of
Keystone Habits
Martin Meadows
Life is easy when you live it the hard way.
The only difference between mediocrity and
success are making the hard choices.
Self-discipline is the key that helps you
make those hard decisions instead of
sticking to what’s easy.
In this presentation you’ll
learn how to introduce
keystone habits that will help
you break through obstacles,
resist temp...
How to
Form a Habit
On average, it takes 66 days to make
a new behavior automatic.
Each day you repeat the wanted behavior,
you need less discipline to make it stick.
66 days later, it takes little discipl...
A habit consists of three elements:
cue, action, and reward.
Your brain follows a simple process.
When it sees a familiar cue, it makes you perform the
associated action in order to g...
If your cue is being offered a chocolate bar,
your action is eating it, and the reward is the
explosion of sweetness in yo...
Fortunately, we can use the exact same
process to form positive habits.
Take the example with
the chocolate bar…
Let’s assume the sweet taste is the reward you want.
The next time you get a craving to eat a candy bar,
replace it with a...
The first time will be the hardest –
that’s when you need self-discipline the
most. Once you repeat the same
behavior seve...
Several weeks later,
you will grab an apple
at the sight of a
chocolate bar by
default – and refuse
the chocolate when
off...
Developing new habits is the essence of self-
discipline, but there’s a better way to introduce new
habits than painfully ...
Keystone habits are
patterns that lead to
the transformation
of several areas of life at
once. Unsurprisingly, one
of the ...
Studies show that regular
physical activity may lead to:
Reduced overeating,
Reduced smoking,
Reduced alcohol consumption,...
Food journaling is another keystone habit.
Research shows that people who
journal their intake of food ate less
and made healthier choices.
In the studies, none of the participants were
encouraged to change any habits besides writing down
what they ate every day...
Other keystone habits you can develop in your life
and expect a positive chain reaction include…
1. Meditation.
There are at least twenty
scientifically-proved benefits of
meditation that carry over to all
areas of life...
2. Waking up earlier.
Waking up even 15 minutes earlier can greatly affect
each day by reducing stress and hurry, thus let...
3. Trying a new thing every single day.
Stepping outside your comfort zone and doing things
you have never done before wil...
4. Saving money.
Having a cushion of savings leads to
decreased stress and more financial
safety that spills over to other...
5. Expressing gratitude
for things you’re thankful for.
Studies show that writing down
three things that went well on a
gi...
Building self-discipline
can be difficult, but if you
establish some keystone
habits in your life, you
won’t need more sel...
Automated behaviors will easily prevents you
from breaking your resolutions and help you
achieve your long-term goals.
If you want to learn more about
self-discipline, perseverance,
success psychology and personal
development in general, cli...
If you want to learn more
about self-discipline,
perseverance, success
psychology and personal
development in general,
cli...
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How to Build Self-Discipline Faster and Easier: Learn the Power of Keystone Habits

Life is easy when you live it the hard way. The only difference between mediocrity and success are making the hard choices. Discover how to build more self-discipline, resist distracting temptations and achieve your long-term goals.

References:

Duhigg C., The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business, 2014.

Lally P., van Jaarsveld C. H. M., Potts H. W. W., Wardle J. (2010). “How are habits formed: Modelling habit formation in the real world.” European Journal of Social Psychology 2010; 40 (6): 998–1009.

Blair S. N., Jacobs D. R., Jr., Powell K. E. (1985), “Relationships between exercise or physical activity and other health behaviors.” Public Health Reports 1985; 100 (2): 172–180.

Hollis J. F., Gullion C. M., Stevens V. J., Brantley P. J., Appel L. J., Ard J. D., Champagne C. M., Dalcin A, Erlinger T. P., Funk K., Laferriere D., Lin P. H., Loria C. M., Samuel-Hodge C., Vollmer W. M., Svetkey L. P.; Weight Loss Maintenance Trial Research Group (2008). “Weight loss during the intensive intervention phase of the weight-loss maintenance trial.” American Journal of Preventative Medicine 2008; 35 (2): 118–126.

https://nccih.nih.gov/health/meditation/overview.htm, Web. February 2nd, 2015.

Seligman M. E., Steen T. A., Park N., Peterson C. (2005). “Positive psychology progress: empirical validation of interventions.” The American Psychologist 2005; 60 (5): 410–21.

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How to Build Self-Discipline Faster and Easier: Learn the Power of Keystone Habits

  1. 1. How to Build Self-Discipline Faster and Easier. Learn the Power of Keystone Habits Martin Meadows
  2. 2. Life is easy when you live it the hard way. The only difference between mediocrity and success are making the hard choices.
  3. 3. Self-discipline is the key that helps you make those hard decisions instead of sticking to what’s easy.
  4. 4. In this presentation you’ll learn how to introduce keystone habits that will help you break through obstacles, resist temptations and achieve your goals.
  5. 5. How to Form a Habit
  6. 6. On average, it takes 66 days to make a new behavior automatic.
  7. 7. Each day you repeat the wanted behavior, you need less discipline to make it stick. 66 days later, it takes little discipline to maintain the habit – it becomes automatic.
  8. 8. A habit consists of three elements: cue, action, and reward.
  9. 9. Your brain follows a simple process. When it sees a familiar cue, it makes you perform the associated action in order to get the reward it craves.
  10. 10. If your cue is being offered a chocolate bar, your action is eating it, and the reward is the explosion of sweetness in your mouth.
  11. 11. Fortunately, we can use the exact same process to form positive habits.
  12. 12. Take the example with the chocolate bar…
  13. 13. Let’s assume the sweet taste is the reward you want. The next time you get a craving to eat a candy bar, replace it with an apple instead.
  14. 14. The first time will be the hardest – that’s when you need self-discipline the most. Once you repeat the same behavior several times, it will get easier and easier to replace the chocolate with an apple.
  15. 15. Several weeks later, you will grab an apple at the sight of a chocolate bar by default – and refuse the chocolate when offered.
  16. 16. Developing new habits is the essence of self- discipline, but there’s a better way to introduce new habits than painfully changing them one by one with cues, actions, and rewards… Keystone habits.
  17. 17. Keystone habits are patterns that lead to the transformation of several areas of life at once. Unsurprisingly, one of the most powerful habits that lead to changing other patterns is regular physical activity.
  18. 18. Studies show that regular physical activity may lead to: Reduced overeating, Reduced smoking, Reduced alcohol consumption, Reduced risk taking, and obviously losing weight and overall better well-being. One habit can help you introduce numerous other healthy changes with little to no resistance.
  19. 19. Food journaling is another keystone habit.
  20. 20. Research shows that people who journal their intake of food ate less and made healthier choices.
  21. 21. In the studies, none of the participants were encouraged to change any habits besides writing down what they ate every day. The change – as in the case of physical activity – happened naturally.
  22. 22. Other keystone habits you can develop in your life and expect a positive chain reaction include…
  23. 23. 1. Meditation. There are at least twenty scientifically-proved benefits of meditation that carry over to all areas of life like: More focus, Stronger immune system, Less depression and anxiety, Improved resilience and mood, Enhanced self-esteem.
  24. 24. 2. Waking up earlier. Waking up even 15 minutes earlier can greatly affect each day by reducing stress and hurry, thus letting you make healthier decisions (rather than shoving that chocolate bar down your throat as your breakfast).
  25. 25. 3. Trying a new thing every single day. Stepping outside your comfort zone and doing things you have never done before will help you discover new hobbies, meet new people, and face your fears.
  26. 26. 4. Saving money. Having a cushion of savings leads to decreased stress and more financial safety that spills over to other aspects of life.
  27. 27. 5. Expressing gratitude for things you’re thankful for. Studies show that writing down three things that went well on a given day led to steady increases in happiness.
  28. 28. Building self-discipline can be difficult, but if you establish some keystone habits in your life, you won’t need more self- discipline than you already have.
  29. 29. Automated behaviors will easily prevents you from breaking your resolutions and help you achieve your long-term goals.
  30. 30. If you want to learn more about self-discipline, perseverance, success psychology and personal development in general, click the button below and sign up for my newsletter to get my free book and more articles delivered straight to your inbox. DOWNLOAD FREE BOOK Martin Meadows
  31. 31. If you want to learn more about self-discipline, perseverance, success psychology and personal development in general, click the button below and sign up for my newsletter to get my free book and more articles delivered straight to your inbox. DOWNLOAD FREE BOOKprofoundselfimprovement.com

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Life is easy when you live it the hard way. The only difference between mediocrity and success are making the hard choices. Discover how to build more self-discipline, resist distracting temptations and achieve your long-term goals. References: Duhigg C., The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business, 2014. Lally P., van Jaarsveld C. H. M., Potts H. W. W., Wardle J. (2010). “How are habits formed: Modelling habit formation in the real world.” European Journal of Social Psychology 2010; 40 (6): 998–1009. Blair S. N., Jacobs D. R., Jr., Powell K. E. (1985), “Relationships between exercise or physical activity and other health behaviors.” Public Health Reports 1985; 100 (2): 172–180. Hollis J. F., Gullion C. M., Stevens V. J., Brantley P. J., Appel L. J., Ard J. D., Champagne C. M., Dalcin A, Erlinger T. P., Funk K., Laferriere D., Lin P. H., Loria C. M., Samuel-Hodge C., Vollmer W. M., Svetkey L. P.; Weight Loss Maintenance Trial Research Group (2008). “Weight loss during the intensive intervention phase of the weight-loss maintenance trial.” American Journal of Preventative Medicine 2008; 35 (2): 118–126. https://nccih.nih.gov/health/meditation/overview.htm, Web. February 2nd, 2015. Seligman M. E., Steen T. A., Park N., Peterson C. (2005). “Positive psychology progress: empirical validation of interventions.” The American Psychologist 2005; 60 (5): 410–21.

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