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pwc.com/CISwearables
The Wearable Life 2.0
Connected living in a
wearable world
Consumer Intelligence Series
2 | The Wearable Life | PwC
Through PwC’s ongoing Consumer Intelligence Series,
we gain directional insights on consumer attitudes and
behaviors in the rapidly changing media and technology
landscape. Building upon a study performed in 2014,
PwC launched the 2016 wearable technology consumer
research to better understand the wearable technology
consumption landscape and identify trends in the industry
to unearth potential opportunities and applications.
This research primarily focused on the attitudes
consumers have towards wearable technology, as well as
takes an in-depth look at penetration and usage of various
types of devices. Additionally, we explored the benefits
and underlying motivations behind usage and how it
impacts both individuals and society.
This report summarizes key findings from a
1,000*
-respondent online quantitative survey1
conducted
in March 2016.
Key research objectives were to:
•	 Gauge current usage, perceptions, attitudes, key drivers,
and satisfaction of wearable technology and how various
factors have changed since 2014
•	 Identify key benefits and barriers to using wearable
technology
•	 Understand how wearable technology is impacting
individuals and society
•	 Assess concerns around data and privacy with
wearable technology
•	 Uncover potential white space opportunities and
applications for wearable technology
*	 The first 700 respondents were fielded without a quota for wearable
technology users in order to obtain natural incidence of ownership. The
remaining 300 respondents were terminated as necessary in order to reach
the 50% quota.
1	 Demographics—50% male, 50% female
50% of sample: 18-34 years old	
50% of sample: 35-64 years old
Census representation for ethnicity and race
Survey overview and study objectives
A snapshot of the wearable world
The future of wearable technology looks promising—not
just here in the US, but worldwide. Turn to page 18 for
a global wearable perspective featuring insights from
Australia, England, Mexico, and Singapore.
How do we define wearable technology
in this report?
Wearable technology refers to accessories and clothing
incorporating computer and advanced electronic
technologies. Examples of wearable technology devices
include fitness trackers/bands, smart glasses, smart
watches, smart clothing, and other wearable devices.
(This includes but is not limited to products such as Fitbit,
Google Glass, GoPro, Apple Watch, etc.)
PwC | The Wearable Life | 3
The wearable now
In our first foray into wearable technology in October 2014,
we said, “There is indeed a wearable future ahead, one that
can dramatically alter the landscape of society and business
as we know it, and it’s right around the corner.”
A scant year and a half later in April 2016, we have turned
that corner.
In October 2014, the Apple Watch would not be released for
another six months and the FitBit was just gaining traction.
With a focus on fitness trackers, companies began releasing
wearables in quick succession. While many of them didn’t
last long, the race had begun, signaling the wearable
movement we see today: Adoption has more than doubled
in two years.
In fact, 49% of respondents in our survey own at least one
device (up from 21% in 2014). And 36% own more than one.
We didn’t even ask this question in our previous survey since
it wasn’t relevant at the time. That’s how far we’ve come.
Explosive growth
The 49% of respondents who say they own a wearable
could be slightly inflated: our definition notwithstanding,
many consumers think of their smartphones as wearables.
Category-wise, smart glasses and smart clothing in
particular seem high, suggesting slight confusion in the
marketplace around what counts as wearable technology,
particularly for newer and emerging product lines.
Regardless, the data—both from our survey as well as
external data we’ve analyzed—shows clearly that the
explosive growth in this space is all too real.
Both men and women like their wearables; however, men
are more likely to own smart watches and smart glasses
than their female counterparts. And not surprisingly,
millennials are far more likely to own wearables than older
adults. Adoption of wearables declines with age.
Of note in our survey findings, however: Consumers aged
35 to 49 are more likely to own smart watches.
Across the board for gender, age, and ethnicity, fitness
wearable technology is most popular.
Fitness band
Smart clothing
Smart video/
photo device
(e.g. GoPro)
Smart watch
Smart
glasses*
45%
14%
27%
15%
12%
Base: Respondents who currently own at least one device (pre-quota sample, n=700); Q10A/B/C/D/E. Please tell us your relationship with the following wearable
technology products. *Includes VR/AR glasses
Fitness runs away with it
% respondents who own type of wearable device
4 | The Wearable Life | PwC
2	 engadget, “2015 is the year that wearables begin to grow up,” January 10, 2015.
3 	 Source: PRNewswire, “The Multi-Billion Dollar Wearable Tech Sector Headlines CES 2016,” November 25, 2015.
Health: primary motivator
Fitness wearables paved the way for wearable technology’s
popularity today. Case in point: the wearable section (made
up of mostly fitness devices) occupied just a few hundred
square feet at the 2014 Consumer Electronic Show (CES)
in Las Vegas. By 2015, the two categories had consolidated,
occupying both the Sands Expo and Convention Center in
Las Vegas.2
By January 2016, the exhibit had tripled, taking center stage.3
Our survey echoed this pattern, with the majority of adoption
taking place within the past year. And while this, too, held true
for fitness devices, their head start has paid off—more of them
were purchased over a year ago than any other type of device.
57% are excited
about wearable
tech in everyday
life, up from 41%
in 2014.
Health = #1
reason for
purchase
PwC | The Wearable Life | 5
Warming up to wearables
In 2014, wearable technology was
a fairly new idea. Some consumers
were excited by its potential;
others were wary of the impact it
could have on their lives, work,
businesses, and privacy.
Headlines such as “Wearable
technology—Opportunity or
nightmare” were not uncommon.
And while some hesitation still exists
today, questions like these have
lessened as our society continues
to become more comfortable with
technology on the whole.
Wearables increase social interaction
Between 2014 and 2016, the number of people saying wearable tech would increase social interaction
more than TRIPLED.
Q: If wearable technology is part of everyday life, would you expect to interact with people... more?
2014
10% 33%
More so since 2014, consumers agree
that wearable technology helps us
exercise smarter (82%), helps parents
keep their children safe (73%),
improves personal accountability
(69%), and makes us more efficient at
home (65%) and at work (63%).
Consumers are also less likely to
agree that wearable technology will
make us more vulnerable to security
breaches (down 8 points), will invade
our privacy (down 7 points), and hurt
our ability to relate to other humans
(down 4 points).
More than half (57%) of our
respondents are excited about the
future of wearable technology as
a part of everyday life, up from
41% in 2014. Women and adults
age 50-64 reported concern that
wearable technology would dampen
human interaction—but they were
significantly less concerned since
our previous survey. Overall, more
respondents now believe wearable
technology would promote, rather
than discourage, human interaction.
A positive shift in overall consumer
sentiment is now clearly underway.
Base: Total sample (n=1000); Q42. If wearable technology is part of everyday life, would you expect to interact with people... more, less,
the same?
2016
6 | The Wearable Life | PwC
Keeping the wearable commitment
Our survey shows the initial buzz
doesn’t always translate to long-term
commitment, most likely for one of
these reasons:
1.	 Consumers don’t perceive a
pressing need for them;
use-case unclear
2.	 Easy to lose
3.	 Unattractive or uncomfortable
4.	 Short-lived battery life
5.	 Does not sync seamlessly with
a smartphone
While full abandonment was less
severe, our survey did indicate a
correlation between frequency of
usage and time of purchase.
Over time, the newness wears off and
fewer consumers use their wearables
daily. Regardless of device type,
wearables purchased over a year
ago are used less often than those
purchased more recently (within
the last six months). Smart clothing
experienced the largest daily drop-
off, while smart glasses experienced
the smallest.
•	 Glasses: 16% decrease
•	 Fitness: 18% decrease
•	 Watches: 22% decrease
•	 Clothing: 33% decrease
For consumers to commit to wearables
for the long term, a device should not
Why wearables?
Strong usage motivators
Allows me to
cut back on
my spending
44%
Has gaming
feature to compete
w/ others
45%
Has apps/features
that reward frequent
users w/ loyalty points
43%
Provides me with
information that I would
otherwise not have
45%
Has features that
reward frequent users
w/ monetary rewards
54%
Looks good;
an important part
of my wardrobe/outfits
36%
only be attractive and comfortable, but
should also reach beyond data delivery
to provide knowledge and benefits
unavailable elsewhere.
For a wearable to be “sticky” in tech
parlance, it needs monetary or other
rewards attached to it. Like loyalty
points. That’s what eight out of 10
current users—particularly women
and millennials—told us.
Meanwhile, accountability is a major
benefit of fitness devices. Wearables
enable social connections for support
in achieving fitness goals. And
foster healthy competition, which is
especially appealing to males and
millennials.
A strong link is also evident
between smartphone connectivity
and frequency of usage: 78% of
respondents with a smartphone-
connected wearable say they use it
more frequently precisely because of
that connectivity. And a whopping
97% are satisfied with the smartphone
application supporting their device.
“Honestly,
I forget it
most of the
time.”
– Male, 31
Base: Currently own at least one wearable device (total sample, n=1000); Q14. Please rate
how strongly the following would impact your usage of wearable technology, if at all (top box).
PwC | The Wearable Life | 7
The wearable workplace
By 2020, more than 75 million wearables will permeate the workplace,
according to research firm Tractica.4
And Gartner research estimates that by
2018, 2 million employees will be required to wear health and fitness tracking
devices as a condition of employment5
.
Wearable tech in the workplace offers a wealth of possibilities for both employer
and employee, as these three real-life scenarios illustrate:
4	 Tractica, “Wearable Devices for Enterprise and Industrial Markets,” 2Q 2015.
5	 Gartner press release, “Gartner Reveals Top Predictions for IT Organizations and Users for 2016 and Beyond,” October 6, 2015.
http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/3143718
6	 WatchReport, “IBM Gives Employees Apple Watches,” October 28, 2015.
7	 Fast Company, “What One Company Learned When They Gave Apple Watches To The Entire Staff,” July 16, 2015.
8	 Tech Times, “Volkswagen Employees Appear To Be Using Google Glass In Factory,” November 25, 2015.
Scenario #1:
A tech company offers
employees a subsidy covering
the cost of a smart watch.
Employees can track how many
steps they take; these steps
are converted into points which
employees can donate to charity
or redeem for merchandise.6
Employer benefit:
Healthier employees translate into
reduced healthcare costs, less sick
time taken, and higher productivity.
Employee benefit:
Fitness plus charitable
donations, swag, and a healthier
lifestyle overall.
Scenario #2:
To coincide with the launch of a
new app designed for women, a
mobile fashion company gives its
entire staff—almost all women—
smart watches.7
Employer benefit:
An in-house microcosm of the
target demographic offered beta
testing for real-time improvements.
Employee benefit:
A brand new wearable for
personal and professional use;
a sense of being included in
corporate decisions.
Scenario #3:
Via 3D smart glasses, shop-floor
employees at an auto manufacturer
receive directly in their field of
vision all the information they need
daily, such as storage locations or
part numbers.8
Employer benefit:
A more efficient, cost-effective
workplace since having the
information readily accessible
reduces cycle time.
Employee benefit:
Streamlined processes foster
productivity while reducing stress.
8 | The Wearable Life | PwC
While the benefits of wearables in
the workplace are indisputable,
employee privacy can pose a
challenge. Theoretically, a company
can track an employee’s location,
hours worked, breaks clocked, even
steps taken.
Personal time (such as late-night
drinking for a friend’s birthday)
might well be monitored as part of
the corporate wellness program.
Conversely, employees who don’t
participate might be perceived as
hiding something.
Companies meanwhile could be
subject to data breaches, given the
content and magnitude of the data.
Wearables have the potential to
capture/store more personal data
than any other device that we’ve ever
owned (e.g. details about employees’
every move, habits, interests, health
information).
Not unlike the early days of laptops
and smartphones, questions about
security and privacy have yet to be
resolved for wearables. As wearable
technology becomes more ubiquitous
in the workplace, transparency and
employee education will go a long
way toward resolving these issues.
67% of
consumers
say, “My
company
should pay for
my wearable.”
37% expect their company to
adopt the latest technology (even
if it doesn't directly influence
their work).
Consumers want
wearable tech at work
2-in-3consumers want their
company to pay for wearables.
This percentage is even higher
among millennials (71%)
and males (70%).
49% of
respondents
say wearable tech will
increase workplace
efficiency.
The reason: efficiency
PwC | The Wearable Life | 9
The business of wearables
Wearable technology offers tremendous
opportunity for companies who want
to better connect with customers.
Health-related companies still have the
edge overall; however, consumers—
especially men and millennials—see a
wealth of wearable tech potential in all
aspects of their lives, far more so than
when we queried them in 2014.
More than women, men are excited
about wearable technology product
options from their cable provider,
bank, and automaker. Millennials
meanwhile are most excited about
devices from their cellphone provider,
teacher, and entertainment provider.
Consumer excitement, however, does
not always correlate to consumer trust.
Interestingly, while consumers trust
banks more than cellphone providers,
they are more excited by wearable tech
options from cellphone providers than
from banks.
Meanwhile, 25% of respondents said
they would not trust any company
with personal information associated
with wearable technology.
Overall, consumers are far more
willing to trust health providers than
consumer-product providers.
Some of the trust issues clearly
correlate with the novelty of
wearables; our own results show
increased comfort levels between
2014 and 2016. Companies can
ease consumer concerns by creating
brand-defining wearables that are
unobtrusive, easy to use, and improve
quality of life. They can also illustrate
to consumers that their data is secure.
65%
62%
62%
61%
57%
57%
56%
52%
52%
50%
57%
41%
38%
34%
33%
18%
12%
11%
10%
9%
8%
29%
Excitement Trust
Car company
Bank
Cable provider
Travel agent
Teacher
Pharmacy
Entertainment provider
Cellphone provider
Health insurance company
Hospital
Doctor’s office
Consumer excitement doesn’t always correlate to consumer trust
% excited about the possibility vs. % who’d trust a product from...
Base: Total sample (n=1000); Q37. Would you be excited to experience a wearable technology product from any of the following types of companies
or or individuals? (top 2 box); Q39. Which companies would you trust to capture your information through wearable tech? (top 2 box)
10 | The Wearable Life | PwC
The wearable journey: from hesitation
to adoption
Price is far and away the number one barrier to adoption
among current nonusers of wearables across all categories
—as well as for respondents who say they have no interest
in wearables in the future.
And with novelty comes a level of uncertainty, which leads
to the second-highest reason for lack of uptake across all
categories. Our respondents told us: “I don’t think I will
actually use it.”
The top two consumer concerns would lead us to believe
that they are hesitant to pay a lot of money for something
Justifying the wearable purchase...
I want it but will I use it?
Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total sample: n=1000); Q27. What are your biggest hesitations with regards to purchasing
[ITEM TYPE] that can send and retrieve information about your health, location, and other details?
Just too pricey!
Price is the #1 reason consumers hesitate to buy wearable tech
Smart clothing
1 Price
2 May not use
3 Lack of relevance/utility
4 Privacy
5 Performance or quality
Smart glasses
1 Price
2 May not use
3 Lack of relevance/utility
4 Privacy
5 Digital overload
Smart watch
1 Price
2 May not use
3 Lack of relevance/utility
4 Device fatigue
5 Privacy
Fitness band
1 Price
2 May not use
3 Privacy
4 Device fatigue
5 Lack of relevance/utility
they don’t even know if they would use. In fact, the same
product flaws discussed earlier that could lead to decreased
usage or abandonment might well prohibit a wearable
purchase in the first place.
One might have thought that privacy would be the biggest
hurdle facing wearable technology today. Not only is
this not true, but concerns around privacy have actually
lessened since 2014 for two out of the four product
categories (smart watches and glasses).
PwC | The Wearable Life | 11
Affordability, productivity are top reasons to buy
Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total sample: n=1000); Q19. Below are possible reasons for why
someone might purchase a wearable technology device. Please select up to 3 statements below that would motivate you to adopt
wearable technology.
30%
It helps me be more productive
with my personal time
36%
It's affordable
25%
It tracks personal information
that's important to me
16%
It works seamlessly with my
other mobile and stationary
tech devices
14%
It looks fashionable/cool
14%
It helps me be more
productive at work
Ultimately, consumers are telling us they have to perceive
real value before they can invest in a wearable. For
companies, the message is clear: Provide an irrefutable use
case that clearly establishes the value of your wearable—
especially one with a lofty price tag—for the consumer.
The reasons behind decreased usage (among current
users) and reluctance to buy (among current nonusers)
are strikingly similar. The same correlation can be said for
increased usage (among current users) and future purchase
motivation (among current nonusers).
Both groups are motivated by productivity, and are drawn
to products that help simplify their life—sentiments
especially true among our female respondents.
Men, meanwhile, are more likely to value the “coolness”
factor (18% vs. 10% women). Seamless integration with a
smartphone also tops the importance list.
12 | The Wearable Life | PwC
Parents (adults with at least one child in the household)
are significantly more likely (49%) than non-parents (24%)
to own not just one, but multiple wearable devices.
As with consumers overall, parents’ main motivator for
initial purchase was health (20%). Most non-parents,
however, received their first device as a gift (18%).
Parents are also more likely than both non-parents and
consumers overall to see wearable technology in a positive
light. And parents are also less likely to believe that
wearable technology will hurt their ability to relate to
other humans, invade their privacy, or make them more
vulnerable to security breaches.
Spotlight on parents
41%
of non-parents
62%
of parents own a
wearable device
vs.
Parents believe an increase in wearable technology can improve their:
Stress level
Relationships
Efficiency
Productivity
Parenting
Tech proficiency
Health
80%
77%
77%
70%
64%
61%
85%
Base: Total respondents (n=1000); Q20. Given what you know, or imagine, about wearable technology, how closely do you agree with
the following statements? (top 2 box)
PwC | The Wearable Life | 13
As for benefits, parents are in favor of wearables that:
1.	 Keep their children safe
2.	 Help them exercise smarter
3.	 Make healthcare more convenient
4.	 Enable healthier eating
5.	 Make technology simpler to use
Parents who don’t currently own a wearable technology
device are much more likely than non-parents to buy one
in the next 12 months. While price is the biggest hurdle for
parents, they are open to wearables that:
1.	 Are reasonably priced
2.	 Improve productivity
3.	 Track important personal information
Fitness band
36%
19%
27%
13%
21%
10%
28%
16%
Smart watch Smart glasses Smart video
/photo device
Parents Non-parents
24%
8%
Smart clothing
Parents are early adopters
% very likely to purchase in next 12 months
Peace of mind is a compelling reason parents buy
wearables. A GPS tracker on a child’s wristband in
a crowded shopping mall connected to the parent’s
smartphone, for example.
Cementing closer ties is another. Parents, even
grandparents, are open to technology as a means to better
connect—and stay connected—with kids and grandkids.
In fact, 80% of parents believe wearable technology
will make technology on the whole simpler and easier
to use, most likely because they see their kids deploying
technology with such ease. They told us ease of use was
among the top five “must haves” for wearables.
As parents look for ways to simplify their lives, keep
track of their kids, monitor their health and fitness, and
chart personal information, wearable tech is an extremely
viable option.
Base: Total pre-quota sample (n=700); Q17. How likely are you to purchase the following wearable technology devices in the next 12 months?
14 | The Wearable Life | PwC
Up 14 pts
from 2014
Up 9 pts
from 2014
70%
56%
Telecommute at least
part of the time
66%
Fewer obesity
problems
63%
Up 18 pts
from 2014
45%
Up 8 pts
from 2014
Facial recognition
61%
53%
Wearable screens
to watch TV at
least half the time
Up 8 pts
from 2014
61%
53%
Live 10 years longer
Up 12 pts
from 2014
Wearable glasses and
hearables tell us about
the people around us
59%
47%
Up 18 pts
from 2014
All clothing is
internet-connected
54% 36%
Up 9 pts
from 2014
Lower health
insurance premiums
62%
53%
57%
The wearable future: live long and strong
Picture a fit, active world where people live longer, work flexible hours—sometimes remotely—and
watch TV on wearable screens. Health insurance is less expensive as insurers monitor fitness levels
and advise preventive measures.
That colleague whose name you can’t remember? No worries: Wearable glasses and hearables
combined with facial recognition software whisper Bob’s name in your ear right before you enter the
room for a meeting with him.
This is how consumers envision a wearable future. With overall sentiment improving, consumers
are becoming more comfortable with the idea that wearable technology will have a positive effect
on life. Since 2014, more consumers agree that widespread use of wearable technology could lead to
a decrease in obesity (63%), an increase in life expectancy (70%), and would preclude the need to
remember names (61%).
Living longer, better lives . . . with wearables
Base: Total sample (n=1000); Q43. Please indicate how likely each of the following is to come about as a result of widespread use of wearable tech. (top 2 box)
PwC | The Wearable Life | 15
The wearable
future: A
healing hand
bracelet with
thermoelectric
pulses to reduce
joint pain.
Consumers are also more optimistic and open to “what
if” possibilities that could one day become reality.
Possibilities that even a few years ago would have been
unthinkable.
A healing hand bracelet with thermoelectric pulses to
reduce joint pain, for example. Or mood-monitoring
headphones that select the next song in your lineup. Or
even a wearable that charts driving patterns for safe-
driver discounts.
83% 82% 66%
85% 62% 62%
Thermoelectric
pulses to heat, cool,
and soothe your body
via a bracelet that
senses temperature,
pain, and stress
The ability to track
your child’s health,
safety, or location
via wearables
Mood-monitoring
headphones to
select your streaming
music line-up
Safe-driver insurance
discounts based on
wearable tech
Name-recognition
earbuds that feed you
a bio when someone
reintroduces him or
herself
Rewards for
productivity
improvements based
on employer-
monitored wearables
Our wearable tomorrow
% who find the below scenarios useful
Base: Total sample (n=1000); Q40. Below are some scenarios of how wearable
technology may be used in the future. Please indicate how useful each would be
to you. (top 2 box)
“If a device could
tell I was having
a panic attack, I
might be able to
stop it before it
happens.”
–Female, 27
16 | The Wearable Life | PwC
“It would be nice
to get notifications
on products you
use, activities you
do, etc., and get
rewarded for doing
them.”
– Female, 24
Future adoption overall, regardless of device type, looks
promising for both current users and nonusers: 39% of
our respondents are very likely to purchase a wearable
within the next 12 months; 76% includes both very and
somewhat likely.
Among current nonusers, nearly one in every four (24%)
said they are very likely to purchase a future device; one in
three includes both very and somewhat likely.
Sustained future success, however, relies heavily on user
engagement. For now, most devices would not pass the
“turnaround test,” which is characteristic of an item you
would turn around and go home to retrieve if you realized
you’d forgotten it on your way to work. Like your wallet. Or
keys. Or smartphone.
The future of wearable technology rests on meeting this
kind of “can’t-live-without-it” utility.
I’m off to buy . . . a wearable
% likely to purchase in next 12 months
57%
Fitness band
53%
Smart watch
50%
Smart video/photo
device (e.g. GoPro)
41%
Smart glasses
38%
Smart clothing
Base: Total pre-quota sample (n=700); Q17 How likely are you to purchase the
following wearable technology devices in the next 12 months? (top 2 box)
Fitness wearables continue to lead the market in 2016—
more than half of our survey respondents say they are very
or somewhat likely to buy a fitness wearable in the next 12
months. However, smart watches are catching up and could
eventually overtake fitness wearables.
The wearable future:
Mood-monitoring
headphones that
select the next song
in your lineup.
PwC | The Wearable Life | 17
Implications
1.Wearables are becoming more ubiquitous. More
consumers are placing high premiums on the role of
wearables to increase life expectancy, decrease obesity,
and improve work-life balance than they did in 2014.
The highest increase, however, was around clothing;
up 18 points from 2014, more than half of consumers
think all clothing will eventually be equipped with
internet connectivity.
2.Wearables are eliciting more positive reactions.
Since 2014, possible benefits are seen as more positive
and perceived drawbacks are seen as less negative.
More consumers agree that wearable technology can
improve customer service, make us more efficient at
work, and relieve stress. Fewer consumers believe that
wearable technology is an invasion of their privacy.
And women value productivity while men seek the
“coolness” factor.
3.Price—not privacy—is the biggest hurdle to
adoption. Across all categories, price is the number
one purchase barrier among non-adopters, followed
by consumers “not thinking they would actually use
it.” Taken together, these top two concerns indicate
they are hesitant to pay a lot of money for something
they don’t even know if they would use. Ultimately,
consumers are telling us they have to perceive
real value before they can invest in a wearable.
For companies, the message is clear: Provide an
irrefutable use case that clearly establishes the value
of your wearable—especially one with a lofty price
tag—for the consumer.
4.Health benefits dominate purchase motivations.
And health-related information is top of mind for
consumers: exercise, medical, dietary. Consumers
are also excited about the prospect of their doctor’s
office, hospital, and/or health insurance provider
releasing their own wearable device, more so than
any other industry.
5.Connectivity boosts engagement. Today, consumers
see a benefit in their wearable connecting to their
smartphone; however, the broader trend is wearable
connectivity with an ecosystem of smart-devices.
Technology is evolving such that the wearable may
not rely as heavily on being tethered to a smartphone
for compute and communication capabilities.
Continue to integrate smartphone capabilities into the
wearable so that it can provide full value on its own.
6.Loyalty programs can foster increased use. Eight
out of 10 current users say they would use their
product more if they were rewarded either monetarily
or with loyalty points. This was especially true among
women and millennials.
7.Parents represent enormous untapped potential.
Eager to simplify their lives, they own multiple
wearable devices. And they are significantly more
likely than non-parents to agree that wearable
technology will improve personal accountability and
will make them more efficient both at home and at
work. They are also twice as likely to think wearable
technology will relieve stress.
18 | The Wearable Life | PwC
Wearable tech goes global
From emerging to developed countries, wearable
technology is growing at a rapid clip worldwide. In
an effort to understand how user wants and behaviors
differ around the world, we peeked behind the
wearable curtain of four quite different countries:
Australia, England, Mexico, and Singapore.1
Unsurprisingly, we found that technology continues to
be the great unifier. In fact, while rates of use do vary
by country, we did uncover some overarching themes:
•	 As expected, millennials are leading overall
wearable adoption
•	 Fitness devices are the most prevalent wearable;
smart watches are catching up
•	 Men are more likely to adopt smart glasses and
watches, at least for now
•	 Women are more likely to value devices that
improve productivity
•	 Health information is most sought after, especially
among women
1	 Methodology: 2000 respondents, n=500 per country; ages 18-64 were recruited for an online quantitative survey in April 2016 and were required to meet the
following screening criteria:
-n=500 per country, natural fallout*
-50% Male / 50% Female
-Ages 18-64 (50% 18-34; 50% 35-64)
*We project that only 45% of Mexico’s population has internet access, and this was an online-only survey. As such, additional weighting to Mexico’s data was
required in order to gain a more realistic picture of the country’s wearable consumer.
PwC | The Wearable Life | 19
Australia
Base: Total sample (n=500); Q10A/Q10B/Q10C/Q10D/Q10E. Please tell
us your relationship with the following wearable technology products.
Base: Total sample (n=500); Q23. One benefit of wearables is that they provide
the user with information about themselves and the things they encounter in
everyday life. If you buy wearable technology in the future, what information
would you personally want your wearable device to tell you?
Fitness
band
48%
Smart video
/photo device
21%
Smart
watches
34%
Smart
glasses
20%
Smart
clothing
14%
Types of devices owned Information wanted from device:
Email/
communication history
33%
Social media
updates
30%
Medical info
50%
Exercise info
53%
Dietary info
41%
1.	 Price
2.	 I don’t think I will actually use it
3.	 One more device to carry/wear
4.	 Lack of relevance/utility
5.	 Privacy
Top 5 purchase motivators and hesitations:
Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total
sample: n=500); Q24. What are your biggest hesitations with regards to
purchasing a [DEVICE]?
1.	 Tracks personal info
2.	 Helps me be more productive
with my personal time
3.	 It’s affordable
4.	 Looks fashionable/cool
5.	 Works seamlessly with other
devices
Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total
sample: n=500); Q19. Below are possible reasons for why someone might
purchase a wearable technology device. Please select up to 3 statements below
that would motivate you to adopt wearable technology.
Likelihood of future purchase:
Base: Does not currently own (total sample: n=500); Q17. How likely are
you to purchase the following wearable technology devices in the next
12 months? (top 2 box)
Smart watches 48%
Fitness band 47%
Smart video/photo device 45%
Smart glasses 37%
Smart clothing 32%
55% own a wearable device
20 | The Wearable Life | PwC
England
Base: Total sample (n=500); Q23. One benefit of wearables is that they provide
the user with information about themselves and the things they encounter in
everyday life. If you buy wearable technology in the future, what information
would you personally want your wearable device to tell you?
Fitness
band
49%
Smart video
/photo device
19%
Smart
watches
37%
Smart
glasses
23%
Smart
clothing
14%
Types of devices owned Information wanted from device:
Email/
communication history
35%
Athlete
analytics
30%
Medical info
56%
Exercise info
58%
Dietary info
48%
1.	 Price
2.	 I don’t think I will actually use it
3.	 One more device to carry/wear
4.	 Privacy
5.	 Lack of relevance/utility
Top 5 purchase motivators and hesitations:
Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total
sample: n=500); Q24. What are your biggest hesitations with regards to
purchasing a [DEVICE]?
1.	 Tracks personal info
2.	 Affordability
3.	 Helps me be more productive with
my personal time
4.	 Works seamlessly with other
devices
5.	 Looks fashionable/cool
Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total
sample: n=500); Q19. Below are possible reasons for why someone might
purchase a wearable technology device. Please select up to 3 statements below
that would motivate you to adopt wearable technology.
Likelihood of future purchase:
Base: Does not currently own (total sample: n=500); Q17. How likely are
you to purchase the following wearable technology devices in the next
12 months? (top 2 box)
Smart watches 54%
Fitness band 58%
Smart video/photo device 46%
Smart glasses 39%
Smart clothing 38%
55% own a wearable device
Base: Total sample (n=500); Q10A/Q10B/Q10C/Q10D/Q10E. Please tell
us your relationship with the following wearable technology products.
PwC | The Wearable Life | 21
Mexico
Base: Total sample (n=500); Q23. One benefit of wearables is that they provide
the user with information about themselves and the things they encounter in
everyday life. If you buy wearable technology in the future, what information
would you personally want your wearable device to tell you?
Fitness
band
24%
Smart video
/photo device
15%
Smart
watches
23%
Smart
glasses
16%
Smart
clothing
13%
Types of devices owned Information wanted from device:
Security info/
biometric monitoring
52%
Home appliance info
47%
Medical info
69%
Exercise info
62%
Dietary info
58%
1.	 Price
2.	 I don’t think I will actually use it
3.	 Lack of relevance/utility
4.	 Complexity
5.	 Privacy
Top 5 purchase motivators and hesitations:
Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total
sample: n=500); Q24. What are your biggest hesitations with regards to
purchasing a [DEVICE]?
1.	 Tracks personal info
2.	 Helps me be more productive with
my personal time
3.	 Helps with productivity at work
4.	 Works seamlessly with other
devices
5.	 Looks fashionable/cool
Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total
sample: n=500); Q19. Below are possible reasons for why someone might
purchase a wearable technology device. Please select up to 3 statements below
that would motivate you to adopt wearable technology.
Likelihood of future purchase:
Base: Does not currently own (total sample: n=500); Q17. How likely are
you to purchase the following wearable technology devices in the next
12 months? (top 2 box)
Smart watches 33%
Fitness band 29%
Smart video/photo device 33%
Smart glasses 28%
Smart clothing 24%
27% own a wearable device
Base: Total sample (n=500); Q10A/Q10B/Q10C/Q10D/Q10E. Please tell
us your relationship with the following wearable technology products.
22 | The Wearable Life | PwC
Singapore
Base: Total sample (n=500); Q23. One benefit of wearables is that they provide
the user with information about themselves and the things they encounter in
everyday life. If you buy wearable technology in the future, what information
would you personally want your wearable device to tell you?
Fitness
band
51%
Smart video
/photo device
22%
Smart
watches
45%
Smart
glasses
20%
Smart
clothing
13%
Types of devices owned Information wanted from device:
Email/
communication history
42%
Social media
updates
40%
Medical info
58%
Exercise info
66%
Dietary info
50%
1.	 Price
2.	 One more device to carry/wear
3.	 I don’t think I will actually use it
4.	 Lack of relevance/utility
5.	 Privacy
Top 5 purchase motivators and hesitations:
Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total
sample: n=500); Q24. What are your biggest hesitations with regards to
purchasing a [DEVICE]?
1.	 Helps me be more productive with
my personal time
2.	 Works seamlessly with other
devices
3.	 It’s affordable
4.	 Tracks personal info
5.	 Looks fashionable/cool
Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total
sample: n=500); Q19. Below are possible reasons for why someone might
purchase a wearable technology device. Please select up to 3 statements below
that would motivate you to adopt wearable technology.
Likelihood of future purchase:
Base: Does not currently own (total sample: n=500); Q17. How likely are
you to purchase the following wearable technology devices in the next
12 months? (top 2 box)
Smart watches 61%
Fitness band 57%
Smart video/photo device 51%
Smart glasses 45%
Smart clothing 34%
60% own a wearable device
Base: Total sample (n=500); Q10A/Q10B/Q10C/Q10D/Q10E. Please tell
us your relationship with the following wearable technology products.
© 2016 PwC. All rights reserved. PwC refers to the US member firm or one of its subsidiaries or affiliates, and may sometimes refer to the PwC network. Each member firm
is a separate legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details.
169259-2016-AK
pwc.com/CISwearables
For more information on this
research, the PwC Consumer
Intelligence Series, or how digital
transformation is shaping
the entertainment and media
industries, please contact one of
our specialists:
Deborah Bothun
deborah.k.bothun@pwc.com
(616) 471 9048
Matthew Lieberman
matthew.lieberman@pwc.com
(213) 217 3326
Additional information is also available on:
pwc.com/cis

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The Wearable Life 2.0

  • 1. pwc.com/CISwearables The Wearable Life 2.0 Connected living in a wearable world Consumer Intelligence Series
  • 2. 2 | The Wearable Life | PwC Through PwC’s ongoing Consumer Intelligence Series, we gain directional insights on consumer attitudes and behaviors in the rapidly changing media and technology landscape. Building upon a study performed in 2014, PwC launched the 2016 wearable technology consumer research to better understand the wearable technology consumption landscape and identify trends in the industry to unearth potential opportunities and applications. This research primarily focused on the attitudes consumers have towards wearable technology, as well as takes an in-depth look at penetration and usage of various types of devices. Additionally, we explored the benefits and underlying motivations behind usage and how it impacts both individuals and society. This report summarizes key findings from a 1,000* -respondent online quantitative survey1 conducted in March 2016. Key research objectives were to: • Gauge current usage, perceptions, attitudes, key drivers, and satisfaction of wearable technology and how various factors have changed since 2014 • Identify key benefits and barriers to using wearable technology • Understand how wearable technology is impacting individuals and society • Assess concerns around data and privacy with wearable technology • Uncover potential white space opportunities and applications for wearable technology * The first 700 respondents were fielded without a quota for wearable technology users in order to obtain natural incidence of ownership. The remaining 300 respondents were terminated as necessary in order to reach the 50% quota. 1 Demographics—50% male, 50% female 50% of sample: 18-34 years old 50% of sample: 35-64 years old Census representation for ethnicity and race Survey overview and study objectives A snapshot of the wearable world The future of wearable technology looks promising—not just here in the US, but worldwide. Turn to page 18 for a global wearable perspective featuring insights from Australia, England, Mexico, and Singapore. How do we define wearable technology in this report? Wearable technology refers to accessories and clothing incorporating computer and advanced electronic technologies. Examples of wearable technology devices include fitness trackers/bands, smart glasses, smart watches, smart clothing, and other wearable devices. (This includes but is not limited to products such as Fitbit, Google Glass, GoPro, Apple Watch, etc.)
  • 3. PwC | The Wearable Life | 3 The wearable now In our first foray into wearable technology in October 2014, we said, “There is indeed a wearable future ahead, one that can dramatically alter the landscape of society and business as we know it, and it’s right around the corner.” A scant year and a half later in April 2016, we have turned that corner. In October 2014, the Apple Watch would not be released for another six months and the FitBit was just gaining traction. With a focus on fitness trackers, companies began releasing wearables in quick succession. While many of them didn’t last long, the race had begun, signaling the wearable movement we see today: Adoption has more than doubled in two years. In fact, 49% of respondents in our survey own at least one device (up from 21% in 2014). And 36% own more than one. We didn’t even ask this question in our previous survey since it wasn’t relevant at the time. That’s how far we’ve come. Explosive growth The 49% of respondents who say they own a wearable could be slightly inflated: our definition notwithstanding, many consumers think of their smartphones as wearables. Category-wise, smart glasses and smart clothing in particular seem high, suggesting slight confusion in the marketplace around what counts as wearable technology, particularly for newer and emerging product lines. Regardless, the data—both from our survey as well as external data we’ve analyzed—shows clearly that the explosive growth in this space is all too real. Both men and women like their wearables; however, men are more likely to own smart watches and smart glasses than their female counterparts. And not surprisingly, millennials are far more likely to own wearables than older adults. Adoption of wearables declines with age. Of note in our survey findings, however: Consumers aged 35 to 49 are more likely to own smart watches. Across the board for gender, age, and ethnicity, fitness wearable technology is most popular. Fitness band Smart clothing Smart video/ photo device (e.g. GoPro) Smart watch Smart glasses* 45% 14% 27% 15% 12% Base: Respondents who currently own at least one device (pre-quota sample, n=700); Q10A/B/C/D/E. Please tell us your relationship with the following wearable technology products. *Includes VR/AR glasses Fitness runs away with it % respondents who own type of wearable device
  • 4. 4 | The Wearable Life | PwC 2 engadget, “2015 is the year that wearables begin to grow up,” January 10, 2015. 3 Source: PRNewswire, “The Multi-Billion Dollar Wearable Tech Sector Headlines CES 2016,” November 25, 2015. Health: primary motivator Fitness wearables paved the way for wearable technology’s popularity today. Case in point: the wearable section (made up of mostly fitness devices) occupied just a few hundred square feet at the 2014 Consumer Electronic Show (CES) in Las Vegas. By 2015, the two categories had consolidated, occupying both the Sands Expo and Convention Center in Las Vegas.2 By January 2016, the exhibit had tripled, taking center stage.3 Our survey echoed this pattern, with the majority of adoption taking place within the past year. And while this, too, held true for fitness devices, their head start has paid off—more of them were purchased over a year ago than any other type of device. 57% are excited about wearable tech in everyday life, up from 41% in 2014. Health = #1 reason for purchase
  • 5. PwC | The Wearable Life | 5 Warming up to wearables In 2014, wearable technology was a fairly new idea. Some consumers were excited by its potential; others were wary of the impact it could have on their lives, work, businesses, and privacy. Headlines such as “Wearable technology—Opportunity or nightmare” were not uncommon. And while some hesitation still exists today, questions like these have lessened as our society continues to become more comfortable with technology on the whole. Wearables increase social interaction Between 2014 and 2016, the number of people saying wearable tech would increase social interaction more than TRIPLED. Q: If wearable technology is part of everyday life, would you expect to interact with people... more? 2014 10% 33% More so since 2014, consumers agree that wearable technology helps us exercise smarter (82%), helps parents keep their children safe (73%), improves personal accountability (69%), and makes us more efficient at home (65%) and at work (63%). Consumers are also less likely to agree that wearable technology will make us more vulnerable to security breaches (down 8 points), will invade our privacy (down 7 points), and hurt our ability to relate to other humans (down 4 points). More than half (57%) of our respondents are excited about the future of wearable technology as a part of everyday life, up from 41% in 2014. Women and adults age 50-64 reported concern that wearable technology would dampen human interaction—but they were significantly less concerned since our previous survey. Overall, more respondents now believe wearable technology would promote, rather than discourage, human interaction. A positive shift in overall consumer sentiment is now clearly underway. Base: Total sample (n=1000); Q42. If wearable technology is part of everyday life, would you expect to interact with people... more, less, the same? 2016
  • 6. 6 | The Wearable Life | PwC Keeping the wearable commitment Our survey shows the initial buzz doesn’t always translate to long-term commitment, most likely for one of these reasons: 1. Consumers don’t perceive a pressing need for them; use-case unclear 2. Easy to lose 3. Unattractive or uncomfortable 4. Short-lived battery life 5. Does not sync seamlessly with a smartphone While full abandonment was less severe, our survey did indicate a correlation between frequency of usage and time of purchase. Over time, the newness wears off and fewer consumers use their wearables daily. Regardless of device type, wearables purchased over a year ago are used less often than those purchased more recently (within the last six months). Smart clothing experienced the largest daily drop- off, while smart glasses experienced the smallest. • Glasses: 16% decrease • Fitness: 18% decrease • Watches: 22% decrease • Clothing: 33% decrease For consumers to commit to wearables for the long term, a device should not Why wearables? Strong usage motivators Allows me to cut back on my spending 44% Has gaming feature to compete w/ others 45% Has apps/features that reward frequent users w/ loyalty points 43% Provides me with information that I would otherwise not have 45% Has features that reward frequent users w/ monetary rewards 54% Looks good; an important part of my wardrobe/outfits 36% only be attractive and comfortable, but should also reach beyond data delivery to provide knowledge and benefits unavailable elsewhere. For a wearable to be “sticky” in tech parlance, it needs monetary or other rewards attached to it. Like loyalty points. That’s what eight out of 10 current users—particularly women and millennials—told us. Meanwhile, accountability is a major benefit of fitness devices. Wearables enable social connections for support in achieving fitness goals. And foster healthy competition, which is especially appealing to males and millennials. A strong link is also evident between smartphone connectivity and frequency of usage: 78% of respondents with a smartphone- connected wearable say they use it more frequently precisely because of that connectivity. And a whopping 97% are satisfied with the smartphone application supporting their device. “Honestly, I forget it most of the time.” – Male, 31 Base: Currently own at least one wearable device (total sample, n=1000); Q14. Please rate how strongly the following would impact your usage of wearable technology, if at all (top box).
  • 7. PwC | The Wearable Life | 7 The wearable workplace By 2020, more than 75 million wearables will permeate the workplace, according to research firm Tractica.4 And Gartner research estimates that by 2018, 2 million employees will be required to wear health and fitness tracking devices as a condition of employment5 . Wearable tech in the workplace offers a wealth of possibilities for both employer and employee, as these three real-life scenarios illustrate: 4 Tractica, “Wearable Devices for Enterprise and Industrial Markets,” 2Q 2015. 5 Gartner press release, “Gartner Reveals Top Predictions for IT Organizations and Users for 2016 and Beyond,” October 6, 2015. http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/3143718 6 WatchReport, “IBM Gives Employees Apple Watches,” October 28, 2015. 7 Fast Company, “What One Company Learned When They Gave Apple Watches To The Entire Staff,” July 16, 2015. 8 Tech Times, “Volkswagen Employees Appear To Be Using Google Glass In Factory,” November 25, 2015. Scenario #1: A tech company offers employees a subsidy covering the cost of a smart watch. Employees can track how many steps they take; these steps are converted into points which employees can donate to charity or redeem for merchandise.6 Employer benefit: Healthier employees translate into reduced healthcare costs, less sick time taken, and higher productivity. Employee benefit: Fitness plus charitable donations, swag, and a healthier lifestyle overall. Scenario #2: To coincide with the launch of a new app designed for women, a mobile fashion company gives its entire staff—almost all women— smart watches.7 Employer benefit: An in-house microcosm of the target demographic offered beta testing for real-time improvements. Employee benefit: A brand new wearable for personal and professional use; a sense of being included in corporate decisions. Scenario #3: Via 3D smart glasses, shop-floor employees at an auto manufacturer receive directly in their field of vision all the information they need daily, such as storage locations or part numbers.8 Employer benefit: A more efficient, cost-effective workplace since having the information readily accessible reduces cycle time. Employee benefit: Streamlined processes foster productivity while reducing stress.
  • 8. 8 | The Wearable Life | PwC While the benefits of wearables in the workplace are indisputable, employee privacy can pose a challenge. Theoretically, a company can track an employee’s location, hours worked, breaks clocked, even steps taken. Personal time (such as late-night drinking for a friend’s birthday) might well be monitored as part of the corporate wellness program. Conversely, employees who don’t participate might be perceived as hiding something. Companies meanwhile could be subject to data breaches, given the content and magnitude of the data. Wearables have the potential to capture/store more personal data than any other device that we’ve ever owned (e.g. details about employees’ every move, habits, interests, health information). Not unlike the early days of laptops and smartphones, questions about security and privacy have yet to be resolved for wearables. As wearable technology becomes more ubiquitous in the workplace, transparency and employee education will go a long way toward resolving these issues. 67% of consumers say, “My company should pay for my wearable.” 37% expect their company to adopt the latest technology (even if it doesn't directly influence their work). Consumers want wearable tech at work 2-in-3consumers want their company to pay for wearables. This percentage is even higher among millennials (71%) and males (70%). 49% of respondents say wearable tech will increase workplace efficiency. The reason: efficiency
  • 9. PwC | The Wearable Life | 9 The business of wearables Wearable technology offers tremendous opportunity for companies who want to better connect with customers. Health-related companies still have the edge overall; however, consumers— especially men and millennials—see a wealth of wearable tech potential in all aspects of their lives, far more so than when we queried them in 2014. More than women, men are excited about wearable technology product options from their cable provider, bank, and automaker. Millennials meanwhile are most excited about devices from their cellphone provider, teacher, and entertainment provider. Consumer excitement, however, does not always correlate to consumer trust. Interestingly, while consumers trust banks more than cellphone providers, they are more excited by wearable tech options from cellphone providers than from banks. Meanwhile, 25% of respondents said they would not trust any company with personal information associated with wearable technology. Overall, consumers are far more willing to trust health providers than consumer-product providers. Some of the trust issues clearly correlate with the novelty of wearables; our own results show increased comfort levels between 2014 and 2016. Companies can ease consumer concerns by creating brand-defining wearables that are unobtrusive, easy to use, and improve quality of life. They can also illustrate to consumers that their data is secure. 65% 62% 62% 61% 57% 57% 56% 52% 52% 50% 57% 41% 38% 34% 33% 18% 12% 11% 10% 9% 8% 29% Excitement Trust Car company Bank Cable provider Travel agent Teacher Pharmacy Entertainment provider Cellphone provider Health insurance company Hospital Doctor’s office Consumer excitement doesn’t always correlate to consumer trust % excited about the possibility vs. % who’d trust a product from... Base: Total sample (n=1000); Q37. Would you be excited to experience a wearable technology product from any of the following types of companies or or individuals? (top 2 box); Q39. Which companies would you trust to capture your information through wearable tech? (top 2 box)
  • 10. 10 | The Wearable Life | PwC The wearable journey: from hesitation to adoption Price is far and away the number one barrier to adoption among current nonusers of wearables across all categories —as well as for respondents who say they have no interest in wearables in the future. And with novelty comes a level of uncertainty, which leads to the second-highest reason for lack of uptake across all categories. Our respondents told us: “I don’t think I will actually use it.” The top two consumer concerns would lead us to believe that they are hesitant to pay a lot of money for something Justifying the wearable purchase... I want it but will I use it? Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total sample: n=1000); Q27. What are your biggest hesitations with regards to purchasing [ITEM TYPE] that can send and retrieve information about your health, location, and other details? Just too pricey! Price is the #1 reason consumers hesitate to buy wearable tech Smart clothing 1 Price 2 May not use 3 Lack of relevance/utility 4 Privacy 5 Performance or quality Smart glasses 1 Price 2 May not use 3 Lack of relevance/utility 4 Privacy 5 Digital overload Smart watch 1 Price 2 May not use 3 Lack of relevance/utility 4 Device fatigue 5 Privacy Fitness band 1 Price 2 May not use 3 Privacy 4 Device fatigue 5 Lack of relevance/utility they don’t even know if they would use. In fact, the same product flaws discussed earlier that could lead to decreased usage or abandonment might well prohibit a wearable purchase in the first place. One might have thought that privacy would be the biggest hurdle facing wearable technology today. Not only is this not true, but concerns around privacy have actually lessened since 2014 for two out of the four product categories (smart watches and glasses).
  • 11. PwC | The Wearable Life | 11 Affordability, productivity are top reasons to buy Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total sample: n=1000); Q19. Below are possible reasons for why someone might purchase a wearable technology device. Please select up to 3 statements below that would motivate you to adopt wearable technology. 30% It helps me be more productive with my personal time 36% It's affordable 25% It tracks personal information that's important to me 16% It works seamlessly with my other mobile and stationary tech devices 14% It looks fashionable/cool 14% It helps me be more productive at work Ultimately, consumers are telling us they have to perceive real value before they can invest in a wearable. For companies, the message is clear: Provide an irrefutable use case that clearly establishes the value of your wearable— especially one with a lofty price tag—for the consumer. The reasons behind decreased usage (among current users) and reluctance to buy (among current nonusers) are strikingly similar. The same correlation can be said for increased usage (among current users) and future purchase motivation (among current nonusers). Both groups are motivated by productivity, and are drawn to products that help simplify their life—sentiments especially true among our female respondents. Men, meanwhile, are more likely to value the “coolness” factor (18% vs. 10% women). Seamless integration with a smartphone also tops the importance list.
  • 12. 12 | The Wearable Life | PwC Parents (adults with at least one child in the household) are significantly more likely (49%) than non-parents (24%) to own not just one, but multiple wearable devices. As with consumers overall, parents’ main motivator for initial purchase was health (20%). Most non-parents, however, received their first device as a gift (18%). Parents are also more likely than both non-parents and consumers overall to see wearable technology in a positive light. And parents are also less likely to believe that wearable technology will hurt their ability to relate to other humans, invade their privacy, or make them more vulnerable to security breaches. Spotlight on parents 41% of non-parents 62% of parents own a wearable device vs. Parents believe an increase in wearable technology can improve their: Stress level Relationships Efficiency Productivity Parenting Tech proficiency Health 80% 77% 77% 70% 64% 61% 85% Base: Total respondents (n=1000); Q20. Given what you know, or imagine, about wearable technology, how closely do you agree with the following statements? (top 2 box)
  • 13. PwC | The Wearable Life | 13 As for benefits, parents are in favor of wearables that: 1. Keep their children safe 2. Help them exercise smarter 3. Make healthcare more convenient 4. Enable healthier eating 5. Make technology simpler to use Parents who don’t currently own a wearable technology device are much more likely than non-parents to buy one in the next 12 months. While price is the biggest hurdle for parents, they are open to wearables that: 1. Are reasonably priced 2. Improve productivity 3. Track important personal information Fitness band 36% 19% 27% 13% 21% 10% 28% 16% Smart watch Smart glasses Smart video /photo device Parents Non-parents 24% 8% Smart clothing Parents are early adopters % very likely to purchase in next 12 months Peace of mind is a compelling reason parents buy wearables. A GPS tracker on a child’s wristband in a crowded shopping mall connected to the parent’s smartphone, for example. Cementing closer ties is another. Parents, even grandparents, are open to technology as a means to better connect—and stay connected—with kids and grandkids. In fact, 80% of parents believe wearable technology will make technology on the whole simpler and easier to use, most likely because they see their kids deploying technology with such ease. They told us ease of use was among the top five “must haves” for wearables. As parents look for ways to simplify their lives, keep track of their kids, monitor their health and fitness, and chart personal information, wearable tech is an extremely viable option. Base: Total pre-quota sample (n=700); Q17. How likely are you to purchase the following wearable technology devices in the next 12 months?
  • 14. 14 | The Wearable Life | PwC Up 14 pts from 2014 Up 9 pts from 2014 70% 56% Telecommute at least part of the time 66% Fewer obesity problems 63% Up 18 pts from 2014 45% Up 8 pts from 2014 Facial recognition 61% 53% Wearable screens to watch TV at least half the time Up 8 pts from 2014 61% 53% Live 10 years longer Up 12 pts from 2014 Wearable glasses and hearables tell us about the people around us 59% 47% Up 18 pts from 2014 All clothing is internet-connected 54% 36% Up 9 pts from 2014 Lower health insurance premiums 62% 53% 57% The wearable future: live long and strong Picture a fit, active world where people live longer, work flexible hours—sometimes remotely—and watch TV on wearable screens. Health insurance is less expensive as insurers monitor fitness levels and advise preventive measures. That colleague whose name you can’t remember? No worries: Wearable glasses and hearables combined with facial recognition software whisper Bob’s name in your ear right before you enter the room for a meeting with him. This is how consumers envision a wearable future. With overall sentiment improving, consumers are becoming more comfortable with the idea that wearable technology will have a positive effect on life. Since 2014, more consumers agree that widespread use of wearable technology could lead to a decrease in obesity (63%), an increase in life expectancy (70%), and would preclude the need to remember names (61%). Living longer, better lives . . . with wearables Base: Total sample (n=1000); Q43. Please indicate how likely each of the following is to come about as a result of widespread use of wearable tech. (top 2 box)
  • 15. PwC | The Wearable Life | 15 The wearable future: A healing hand bracelet with thermoelectric pulses to reduce joint pain. Consumers are also more optimistic and open to “what if” possibilities that could one day become reality. Possibilities that even a few years ago would have been unthinkable. A healing hand bracelet with thermoelectric pulses to reduce joint pain, for example. Or mood-monitoring headphones that select the next song in your lineup. Or even a wearable that charts driving patterns for safe- driver discounts. 83% 82% 66% 85% 62% 62% Thermoelectric pulses to heat, cool, and soothe your body via a bracelet that senses temperature, pain, and stress The ability to track your child’s health, safety, or location via wearables Mood-monitoring headphones to select your streaming music line-up Safe-driver insurance discounts based on wearable tech Name-recognition earbuds that feed you a bio when someone reintroduces him or herself Rewards for productivity improvements based on employer- monitored wearables Our wearable tomorrow % who find the below scenarios useful Base: Total sample (n=1000); Q40. Below are some scenarios of how wearable technology may be used in the future. Please indicate how useful each would be to you. (top 2 box) “If a device could tell I was having a panic attack, I might be able to stop it before it happens.” –Female, 27
  • 16. 16 | The Wearable Life | PwC “It would be nice to get notifications on products you use, activities you do, etc., and get rewarded for doing them.” – Female, 24 Future adoption overall, regardless of device type, looks promising for both current users and nonusers: 39% of our respondents are very likely to purchase a wearable within the next 12 months; 76% includes both very and somewhat likely. Among current nonusers, nearly one in every four (24%) said they are very likely to purchase a future device; one in three includes both very and somewhat likely. Sustained future success, however, relies heavily on user engagement. For now, most devices would not pass the “turnaround test,” which is characteristic of an item you would turn around and go home to retrieve if you realized you’d forgotten it on your way to work. Like your wallet. Or keys. Or smartphone. The future of wearable technology rests on meeting this kind of “can’t-live-without-it” utility. I’m off to buy . . . a wearable % likely to purchase in next 12 months 57% Fitness band 53% Smart watch 50% Smart video/photo device (e.g. GoPro) 41% Smart glasses 38% Smart clothing Base: Total pre-quota sample (n=700); Q17 How likely are you to purchase the following wearable technology devices in the next 12 months? (top 2 box) Fitness wearables continue to lead the market in 2016— more than half of our survey respondents say they are very or somewhat likely to buy a fitness wearable in the next 12 months. However, smart watches are catching up and could eventually overtake fitness wearables. The wearable future: Mood-monitoring headphones that select the next song in your lineup.
  • 17. PwC | The Wearable Life | 17 Implications 1.Wearables are becoming more ubiquitous. More consumers are placing high premiums on the role of wearables to increase life expectancy, decrease obesity, and improve work-life balance than they did in 2014. The highest increase, however, was around clothing; up 18 points from 2014, more than half of consumers think all clothing will eventually be equipped with internet connectivity. 2.Wearables are eliciting more positive reactions. Since 2014, possible benefits are seen as more positive and perceived drawbacks are seen as less negative. More consumers agree that wearable technology can improve customer service, make us more efficient at work, and relieve stress. Fewer consumers believe that wearable technology is an invasion of their privacy. And women value productivity while men seek the “coolness” factor. 3.Price—not privacy—is the biggest hurdle to adoption. Across all categories, price is the number one purchase barrier among non-adopters, followed by consumers “not thinking they would actually use it.” Taken together, these top two concerns indicate they are hesitant to pay a lot of money for something they don’t even know if they would use. Ultimately, consumers are telling us they have to perceive real value before they can invest in a wearable. For companies, the message is clear: Provide an irrefutable use case that clearly establishes the value of your wearable—especially one with a lofty price tag—for the consumer. 4.Health benefits dominate purchase motivations. And health-related information is top of mind for consumers: exercise, medical, dietary. Consumers are also excited about the prospect of their doctor’s office, hospital, and/or health insurance provider releasing their own wearable device, more so than any other industry. 5.Connectivity boosts engagement. Today, consumers see a benefit in their wearable connecting to their smartphone; however, the broader trend is wearable connectivity with an ecosystem of smart-devices. Technology is evolving such that the wearable may not rely as heavily on being tethered to a smartphone for compute and communication capabilities. Continue to integrate smartphone capabilities into the wearable so that it can provide full value on its own. 6.Loyalty programs can foster increased use. Eight out of 10 current users say they would use their product more if they were rewarded either monetarily or with loyalty points. This was especially true among women and millennials. 7.Parents represent enormous untapped potential. Eager to simplify their lives, they own multiple wearable devices. And they are significantly more likely than non-parents to agree that wearable technology will improve personal accountability and will make them more efficient both at home and at work. They are also twice as likely to think wearable technology will relieve stress.
  • 18. 18 | The Wearable Life | PwC Wearable tech goes global From emerging to developed countries, wearable technology is growing at a rapid clip worldwide. In an effort to understand how user wants and behaviors differ around the world, we peeked behind the wearable curtain of four quite different countries: Australia, England, Mexico, and Singapore.1 Unsurprisingly, we found that technology continues to be the great unifier. In fact, while rates of use do vary by country, we did uncover some overarching themes: • As expected, millennials are leading overall wearable adoption • Fitness devices are the most prevalent wearable; smart watches are catching up • Men are more likely to adopt smart glasses and watches, at least for now • Women are more likely to value devices that improve productivity • Health information is most sought after, especially among women 1 Methodology: 2000 respondents, n=500 per country; ages 18-64 were recruited for an online quantitative survey in April 2016 and were required to meet the following screening criteria: -n=500 per country, natural fallout* -50% Male / 50% Female -Ages 18-64 (50% 18-34; 50% 35-64) *We project that only 45% of Mexico’s population has internet access, and this was an online-only survey. As such, additional weighting to Mexico’s data was required in order to gain a more realistic picture of the country’s wearable consumer.
  • 19. PwC | The Wearable Life | 19 Australia Base: Total sample (n=500); Q10A/Q10B/Q10C/Q10D/Q10E. Please tell us your relationship with the following wearable technology products. Base: Total sample (n=500); Q23. One benefit of wearables is that they provide the user with information about themselves and the things they encounter in everyday life. If you buy wearable technology in the future, what information would you personally want your wearable device to tell you? Fitness band 48% Smart video /photo device 21% Smart watches 34% Smart glasses 20% Smart clothing 14% Types of devices owned Information wanted from device: Email/ communication history 33% Social media updates 30% Medical info 50% Exercise info 53% Dietary info 41% 1. Price 2. I don’t think I will actually use it 3. One more device to carry/wear 4. Lack of relevance/utility 5. Privacy Top 5 purchase motivators and hesitations: Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total sample: n=500); Q24. What are your biggest hesitations with regards to purchasing a [DEVICE]? 1. Tracks personal info 2. Helps me be more productive with my personal time 3. It’s affordable 4. Looks fashionable/cool 5. Works seamlessly with other devices Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total sample: n=500); Q19. Below are possible reasons for why someone might purchase a wearable technology device. Please select up to 3 statements below that would motivate you to adopt wearable technology. Likelihood of future purchase: Base: Does not currently own (total sample: n=500); Q17. How likely are you to purchase the following wearable technology devices in the next 12 months? (top 2 box) Smart watches 48% Fitness band 47% Smart video/photo device 45% Smart glasses 37% Smart clothing 32% 55% own a wearable device
  • 20. 20 | The Wearable Life | PwC England Base: Total sample (n=500); Q23. One benefit of wearables is that they provide the user with information about themselves and the things they encounter in everyday life. If you buy wearable technology in the future, what information would you personally want your wearable device to tell you? Fitness band 49% Smart video /photo device 19% Smart watches 37% Smart glasses 23% Smart clothing 14% Types of devices owned Information wanted from device: Email/ communication history 35% Athlete analytics 30% Medical info 56% Exercise info 58% Dietary info 48% 1. Price 2. I don’t think I will actually use it 3. One more device to carry/wear 4. Privacy 5. Lack of relevance/utility Top 5 purchase motivators and hesitations: Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total sample: n=500); Q24. What are your biggest hesitations with regards to purchasing a [DEVICE]? 1. Tracks personal info 2. Affordability 3. Helps me be more productive with my personal time 4. Works seamlessly with other devices 5. Looks fashionable/cool Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total sample: n=500); Q19. Below are possible reasons for why someone might purchase a wearable technology device. Please select up to 3 statements below that would motivate you to adopt wearable technology. Likelihood of future purchase: Base: Does not currently own (total sample: n=500); Q17. How likely are you to purchase the following wearable technology devices in the next 12 months? (top 2 box) Smart watches 54% Fitness band 58% Smart video/photo device 46% Smart glasses 39% Smart clothing 38% 55% own a wearable device Base: Total sample (n=500); Q10A/Q10B/Q10C/Q10D/Q10E. Please tell us your relationship with the following wearable technology products.
  • 21. PwC | The Wearable Life | 21 Mexico Base: Total sample (n=500); Q23. One benefit of wearables is that they provide the user with information about themselves and the things they encounter in everyday life. If you buy wearable technology in the future, what information would you personally want your wearable device to tell you? Fitness band 24% Smart video /photo device 15% Smart watches 23% Smart glasses 16% Smart clothing 13% Types of devices owned Information wanted from device: Security info/ biometric monitoring 52% Home appliance info 47% Medical info 69% Exercise info 62% Dietary info 58% 1. Price 2. I don’t think I will actually use it 3. Lack of relevance/utility 4. Complexity 5. Privacy Top 5 purchase motivators and hesitations: Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total sample: n=500); Q24. What are your biggest hesitations with regards to purchasing a [DEVICE]? 1. Tracks personal info 2. Helps me be more productive with my personal time 3. Helps with productivity at work 4. Works seamlessly with other devices 5. Looks fashionable/cool Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total sample: n=500); Q19. Below are possible reasons for why someone might purchase a wearable technology device. Please select up to 3 statements below that would motivate you to adopt wearable technology. Likelihood of future purchase: Base: Does not currently own (total sample: n=500); Q17. How likely are you to purchase the following wearable technology devices in the next 12 months? (top 2 box) Smart watches 33% Fitness band 29% Smart video/photo device 33% Smart glasses 28% Smart clothing 24% 27% own a wearable device Base: Total sample (n=500); Q10A/Q10B/Q10C/Q10D/Q10E. Please tell us your relationship with the following wearable technology products.
  • 22. 22 | The Wearable Life | PwC Singapore Base: Total sample (n=500); Q23. One benefit of wearables is that they provide the user with information about themselves and the things they encounter in everyday life. If you buy wearable technology in the future, what information would you personally want your wearable device to tell you? Fitness band 51% Smart video /photo device 22% Smart watches 45% Smart glasses 20% Smart clothing 13% Types of devices owned Information wanted from device: Email/ communication history 42% Social media updates 40% Medical info 58% Exercise info 66% Dietary info 50% 1. Price 2. One more device to carry/wear 3. I don’t think I will actually use it 4. Lack of relevance/utility 5. Privacy Top 5 purchase motivators and hesitations: Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total sample: n=500); Q24. What are your biggest hesitations with regards to purchasing a [DEVICE]? 1. Helps me be more productive with my personal time 2. Works seamlessly with other devices 3. It’s affordable 4. Tracks personal info 5. Looks fashionable/cool Base: Does not currently own/somewhat or very unlikely to purchase (total sample: n=500); Q19. Below are possible reasons for why someone might purchase a wearable technology device. Please select up to 3 statements below that would motivate you to adopt wearable technology. Likelihood of future purchase: Base: Does not currently own (total sample: n=500); Q17. How likely are you to purchase the following wearable technology devices in the next 12 months? (top 2 box) Smart watches 61% Fitness band 57% Smart video/photo device 51% Smart glasses 45% Smart clothing 34% 60% own a wearable device Base: Total sample (n=500); Q10A/Q10B/Q10C/Q10D/Q10E. Please tell us your relationship with the following wearable technology products.
  • 23. © 2016 PwC. All rights reserved. PwC refers to the US member firm or one of its subsidiaries or affiliates, and may sometimes refer to the PwC network. Each member firm is a separate legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details. 169259-2016-AK pwc.com/CISwearables For more information on this research, the PwC Consumer Intelligence Series, or how digital transformation is shaping the entertainment and media industries, please contact one of our specialists: Deborah Bothun deborah.k.bothun@pwc.com (616) 471 9048 Matthew Lieberman matthew.lieberman@pwc.com (213) 217 3326 Additional information is also available on: pwc.com/cis