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 Standard Money
 Commodity Money
 Fiat Money
 Credit Money
 Definitive Money
 Coinage
 Seigniorage
 Gresham’s Law
 a monetary unit which is designated by
a government to serve as the basis of
its currency system and into which other
ty...
 is money whose value comes from
a commodity of which it is made.
Commodity money consists of objects
that have value in ...
 is an item such as a token or piece of
paper that has no intrinsic value, but can
be exchanged on demand for a
commodity...
 Is form of money that is regulated
artificially. Its value is determine solely by
the demand for the supply of the money...
 is money that is not convertible into any
other form of money. The Fed issues
all definitive money. Banks can only issue...
Types Currency Issued
Standard Money Central Bank Notes
Representative Money Philippine Treasury Certificates, 1903
Fiat M...
 The act, process or right of
manufacturing uniform coins and
stamping them in some way as a
guaranty of their purity and...
 a profit made by government by issuing
curre4ncy especially the difference
between the face value of coins and
their pro...
 a monetary principle stating that “bad
money drive out good.”
 It states that if a new coin (“bad
money”) is assigned t...
Different types-of-money-risha-mhae
Different types-of-money-risha-mhae
Different types-of-money-risha-mhae
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Different types-of-money-risha-mhae

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It's all about different types of money as coin.

Publié dans : Économie & finance
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Different types-of-money-risha-mhae

  1. 1.  Standard Money  Commodity Money  Fiat Money  Credit Money  Definitive Money  Coinage  Seigniorage  Gresham’s Law
  2. 2.  a monetary unit which is designated by a government to serve as the basis of its currency system and into which other types of money in the country are convertible compare standard of value.
  3. 3.  is money whose value comes from a commodity of which it is made. Commodity money consists of objects that have value in themselves as well as value in their use as money.
  4. 4.  is an item such as a token or piece of paper that has no intrinsic value, but can be exchanged on demand for a commodity that does have intrinsic value, such as gold, silver, copper, and even tobacco.  Different kinds of Representative Money Convertible Representative Money Inconvertible Representative Money Subsidiary or token coins
  5. 5.  Is form of money that is regulated artificially. Its value is determine solely by the demand for the supply of the money and is independent of value of material of which it is made.  Redeemable Fiat Money  Irredeemable Fiat Money
  6. 6.  is money that is not convertible into any other form of money. The Fed issues all definitive money. Banks can only issue credit convertible into definitive money. Most definitive money exists as paper dollars, but also includes the deposits that banks hold at the Fed.
  7. 7. Types Currency Issued Standard Money Central Bank Notes Representative Money Philippine Treasury Certificates, 1903 Fiat Money (old concept) Japanese we notes Fiat Money (current concept) Bangko Sentral Notes Convertible Representative Money Philippine Treasury Certificates, 1903 Inconvertible Representative Money Bangko Sentral Notes Subsidiary/Token Coins Metallic coins Credit Money (government) Bangko Sentral Notes Credit Money (private bank) Bank notes issued by the Phillipine National Bank in 1920 Definitive Money Bangko Sentral Notes
  8. 8.  The act, process or right of manufacturing uniform coins and stamping them in some way as a guaranty of their purity and of their weight.
  9. 9.  a profit made by government by issuing curre4ncy especially the difference between the face value of coins and their production.
  10. 10.  a monetary principle stating that “bad money drive out good.”  It states that if a new coin (“bad money”) is assigned the same value as an older coin containing higher amount of previous amount of precious metal (“good money”), then the new coin will be used in circulation while the old coin will be hoarded and will disappear from circulation.

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