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20 CENTRES FOR 2010
FINAL REPORT OF THE OFFICIAL SOCIAL CAMPAIGN OF THE 2010 FIFA WORLD CUPTM
A legacy for Africa	 2
Football for Hope	 4
Owned by the community	 6
Map of 20 Centres for 2010	 8
Football for Hope Cent...
Dear friends of football,
We are delighted to share with you this final report of the
“20 Centres for 2010” campaign. Over...
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  1. 1. 20 CENTRES FOR 2010 FINAL REPORT OF THE OFFICIAL SOCIAL CAMPAIGN OF THE 2010 FIFA WORLD CUPTM
  2. 2. A legacy for Africa 2 Football for Hope 4 Owned by the community 6 Map of 20 Centres for 2010 8 Football for Hope Centres Botswana, Ramotswa 10 Burundi, Bujumbura 12 Cameroon, Mamfe 14 Cape Verde, Santiago 16 Democratic Republic of Congo, Lubumbashi 18 Ghana, Cape Coast 20 Kenya, Nairobi 22 Lesotho, Maseru 24 Mali, Bamako 26 Mozambique, Manica 28 Namibia, Windhoek 30 Rwanda, Kigali 32 South Africa, Alexandra 34 South Africa, Edendale 36 South Africa, Khayelitsha 38 South Africa, Kimberley 40 South Africa, Limpopo 42 South Africa, QwaQwa 44 Tanzania, Iringa 46 Zimbabwe, Luveve 48 Project stakeholders 50 Yingli Green Energy 52 Investment by FIFA 54 CONTENTS 1
  3. 3. Dear friends of football, We are delighted to share with you this final report of the “20 Centres for 2010” campaign. Over the past years, we have been working closely with community-based organisations across Africa in developing, constructing and running the 20 Football for Hope Centres for education, public health and football. FIFA is passionate about embracing the popularity of football to improve the lives of young people. As football becomes a bigger economic and social force in the world, it is vital that we ensure the beautiful game plays its part in building a better future for all. It was a great privilege to have the 2010 FIFA World Cup™ in South Africa, and, through the achievements of this campaign, we hope to further contribute to a tangible legacy for the African continent. Joseph S. Blatter FIFA President A LEGACY FOR 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report2
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  5. 5. Football has become a vital instrument for hundreds of social development programmes run by non-governmental and community- based organisations all around the world. These programmes are providing children and young people with valuable tools to actively make a difference in their own lives. By addressing the most pressing issues in each community, the programmes are contributing to positive social change on a global scale. In support of these efforts and as part of its corporate social responsibility, FIFA initiated Football for Hope in 2005 to offer funding, equipment, training and more visibility, as well as a platform for discussion and collaboration. The ultimate goal is to use the world’s most popular sport to spark positive change for a better future. The support provided by FIFA through Football for Hope has already benefited more than 250 programmes in over 60 countries on all continents. HIV/AIDS education, conflict resolution, gender equality, social integration of people with intellectual disabilities, capacity building, work training, peace building, youth leadership and life skills are just some of the objectives pursued. FOOTBALL FOR HOPE CENTRES Leading up to the 2010 FIFA World Cup™ and with the aim of contributing to a tangible social legacy for Africa, FIFA launched its official social campaign in Africa in 2007. The aim of the “20 Centres for 2010” campaign was to create 20 Football for Hope Centres for education, public health and football across Africa. The importance of this legacy is highlighted by the fact that many communities in Africa continue to face serious social challenges. By using the positive elements of football, many locally run organisations have been successful in reaching young people and addressing such challenges. The Football for Hope Centres were created as facilities from which these local best-practice organisations can reach out to the local young people and their communities. As a result of the campaign, the organisations involved have already been able to improve education and health services for over 70,000 young people in disadvantaged communities across Africa. Hundreds of thousands more will benefit from the centres in the years to come, providing a highly positive impact on the drive to use football for social development. “Children are always playing on the football pitch and seeing a smile on a child’s face makes me also feel good about myself. Thanks to FIFA and Football for Hope for this opportunity.” Kamogelo Pastor Molekwane Coach and peer educator at South East Football for Hope Centre “Before the Football for Hope Centre was here, I would see kids mainly hanging out on the streets. But since it was built, there haven’t been so many kids loitering around. The centre is a place where they can go and learn about being healthy and safe. Some come here for help with school assignments, to play games, to do arts and crafts, learn how to play chess, and so the clinic has become something more than just a health centre.” Health academy counsellor at a Football for Hope Centre “When I look at the young people and children at the centre, I am full of hope and confidence that we are becoming a hub of peace. Although we have only been up and running for a short time, we are already observing changes in behaviour among the young people and community and schools. Parents are happy with our programmes and willing to work with us.” Kimisagara Football for Hope Centre manager 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report4
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  7. 7. OWNED BY THE The creation of a Football for Hope Centre begins with identifying both the local challenges as well as a local organisation that successfully uses football-based programmes for social development. The centre and the programmes that are run there (e.g. HIV/Aids awareness, literacy, gender equality and integration) are created to meet the needs of the community. Community involvement and ownership are crucial for the success and sustainability of the centres. The local community is involved in the entire process from the very first step, including the architectural design for the centre, construction and, whenever possible, the involvement of the local workforce and skill-building programmes. Over 600 local coaches have been trained to deliver programmes and 60 full-time managers, education officers, and health officers are hired for the centres. Through the continuous support of the local community, the organisations chosen as Centre Hosts manage day-to-day activities, progressively making the centres self-supporting hubs and models for social development through football. 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report6
  8. 8. “This campaign emphasises the power of football far beyond the boundaries of the pitch. We want to build 20 Football for Hope Centres to deliver on our promise to give back to Africa something substantial and leave a lasting legacy well after 11 July 2010.” Joseph S. Blatter, FIFA President PUBLIC HEALTH Poor health poses a major challenge to socio-economic development. HIV/AIDS is only one of various health problems that burden African communities and their young people. The centres address such challenges by offering a range of services, including health-awareness programmes, and by referring visitors to existing health facilities. FOOTBALL PITCH The driving force of our social engagement is football itself. With its unique appeal and core values that reach across generations and cultures, football offers common ground for engaging in a wide range of social development activities. It is thus an ideal tool for tackling social challenges and bringing communities together. INFRASTRUCTURE A Football for Hope Centre consists of a structure dedicated to education and public health facilities for young people as well as a 40 by 20 metre football turf pitch. Each centre is designed in close collaboration with the community and the centre host to ensure that the infrastructure is consistent with local needs and the objectives of the programmes to be run in the centre. EDUCATION Football-based activities are used at the centres to provide fulfilling out-of-school learning experiences for young people. The centres provide a space for learning where young people can take part in educational activities and acquire new skills, e.g. computing and leadership skills, in accordance with local requirements and in partnership with community schools. 7
  9. 9. MAP OF THE OFFICIAL CAMPAIGN OF THE 2010 FIFA WORLD CUPTM BURUNDI, BUJUMBURA KABONDO Centre Host: Terre des hommes, in partnership with Giriyuja. Focus: To facilitate the reintegration of street children back into society by using football and combining it with protection activities, literacy courses, health education, access to health services and counselling. RWANDA, KIGALI KIMISAGARA Centre Host: Espérance – Association des Jeunes Sportifs de Kigali. Focus: To educate on HIV/AIDS awareness, leadership and the environment, including organising clean-up groups skills and football. 1 9 MALI, BAMAKO BAGUINÉDA Centre Host: Association Malienne pour la Promotion de la Jeune Fille et de la Femme (AMPJF). Focus: To empower girls and young women to strengthen their self-esteem and social status in the community. TANZANIA, IRINGA IRINGA Centre Host: Iringa Development of Youth, Disabled and Children Care. Focus: To provide programmes on HIV/AIDS and environment for young people as well as vocational training and microfinance. 2 10 MOZAMBIQUE, MANICA MANICA Centre Host: Grupo Desportivo de Manica. Focus: To create networks of social coherence, promote healthy relationships and healthy living via HIV/AIDS and nutrition awareness programmes, enhance computer literacy and provide English classes. CAPE VERDE, SANTIAGO TARRAFAL Centre Host: Delta Cultura Cabo Verde. Focus: To offer vulnerable young people after-school opportunities including educational training, cultural activities and football. 113 NAMIBIA, WINDHOEK KATUTURA Centre Host: Special Olympics Namibia. Focus: To provide individuals with intellectual disabilities with adequate learning facilities, raise their awareness of HIV/AIDS and help with job searches. GHANA, CAPE COAST OGUAA Centre Host: Play Soccer Ghana. Focus: To integrate education into health, social and football programmes to enhance leadership skills and promote socio-economic development. 124 BOTSWANA, RAMOTSWA SOUTH EAST Centre Host: South East District Youth Empowerment Association (SEDYEA). Focus: To provide young people with the knowledge, skills and support they need to remain HIV-free as well as enhance their leadership skills and empower girls. CAMEROON, MAMFE BESONGABANG Centre Host: United Action for Children. Focus: To offer programmes that encourage children who are out of school or vulnerable to remain in or re-enter the school system as well as help with job searches. 135 ZIMBABWE, LUVEVE BULAWAYO Centre Host: Grassroot Soccer Zimbabwe. Focus: To use the power of football in the fight against HIV/AIDS by providing African youth with the skills and support to live HIV-free. SOUTH AFRICA, KIMBERLEY KIMBERLEY Centre Host: LoveLife. Focus: To engage, motivate and educate young people to build and develop healthy, positive attitudes to sexuality within the context of HIV/AIDS prevention. 146 LESOTHO, MASERU LESOTHO Centre Host: Kick4Life. Focus: To teach HIV/AIDS awareness including education and testing, essential life skills, personal development, education and work training. DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO, LUBUMBASHI KALEBUKA Centre Host: Georges Malaika Foundation. Focus: To provide the community of Kalebuka with services relating to education, health, life skills and football. 157 SOUTH AFRICA, KHAYELITSHA KHAYELITSHA Centre Host: Grassroot Soccer (GRS). Focus: To use the power of football in the fight against HIV/AIDS by providing African youth with the skills and support to live HIV free. KENYA, NAIROBI MATHARE Centre Host: Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA). Focus: To educate on HIV/AIDS awareness, leadership and the environment, including organising clean-up groups skills and football. 168 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report8
  10. 10. 1 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 19 14 15 20 16 18 17 3 SOUTH AFRICA, QWAQWA QWAQWA Centre Host: LoveLife. Focus: To engage, motivate and educate young people to build and develop healthy, positive attitudes to sexuality within the context of HIV/AIDS prevention. SOUTH AFRICA, EDENDALE EDENDALE Centre Host: WhizzKids United. Focus: To promote health, especially HIV/AIDS prevention, care, treatment and support, as well as life skills. 18 20 SOUTH AFRICA, ALEXANDRA ALEXANDRA Centre Host: Grassroot Soccer (GRS). Focus: To use the power of football in the fight against HIV/AIDS by providing African youth with the skills and support to live HIV free. SOUTH AFRICA, LIMPOPO MOGALAKWENA Centre Host: South African Red Cross Society (Mokopane branch). Focus: To offer social services and youth development programmes including peer education, public health, volunteer counselling and testing and first aid courses. 1917 9
  11. 11. FOOTBALL FOR HOPE CENTRE CENTRE HOST: SOUTH EAST DISTRICT YOUTH EMPOWERMENT ASSOCIATION (SEDYEA) BOTSWANA, RAMOTSWA “The number of girls at the centre has increased, which will help us focus on our girl empowerment activities.” Lesego Mogorosi South East Football for Hope Centre Manager 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report10
  12. 12. ADDRESSING BULLYING, TEENAGE PREGNANCY AND SAFE MALE CIRCUMCISION Through sports and education, SEDYEA empowers young people and guides them towards responsible, creative action in community development. Over 2,000 girls and boys from various social backgrounds are supported annually by the activities of the Football for Hope Centre in Botswana. “The South East Football for Hope Centre has given me an opportunity to play a positive role in other people’s lives.” Dimpho “Dizzy” Mmokolodi South East Football for Hope Centre volunteer The centre offers: • A football league • Life skills • Football coaching clinics • Study groups • Health discussion forums • Theatre classes The activities at the centre address issues faced by children, such as bullying, hygiene, teenage pregnancy, rape and safe male circumcision. These issues are integrated into football coaching clinics and health discussion forums. Children and young people are empowered and given eye-opening opportunities allowing them to make educated choices. The training and mentorship received allow them to grow as individuals. Many children then go on to become coaches, facilitators and positive peer leaders. The pitch is key to the success of the activities. Since it was installed, more children and young people have been attending the activities run by SEDYEA and benefiting from positive behavioural changes. For more information, please visit www.facebook.com/SEDYEA 11
  13. 13. FOOTBALL FOR HOPE CENTRE CENTRE HOST: TERRE DES HOMMES AND GIRIYUJA BURUNDI, BUJUMBURA “The centre allows us to reinforce our support of street children and provide a place of comfort and improved protection to marginalised children. It’s a super working space.” Kabondo Football for Hope Centre staff 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report12
  14. 14. FOOTBALL IS UNITING STREET CHILDREN WITH CHILDREN FROM THE COMMUNITY For five years, Terre des hommes and Giriyuja have been welcoming street children from Bujumbura who have no access to education or health services on a dirt football pitch with a container to keep the balls. During the sessions, the social workers and peer educators listen and support the children and young people. Thanks to the Football for Hope Centre, these street children can now rely on a proper infrastructure to wash themselves and their clothes, receive basic medical care and a basic education, and be heard – all in an environment where football plays a central role. An average of 150 street children and 300 children from the community are benefiting weekly from the Football for Hope Centre. Socio-sporting activities and football are used to integrate street children with children from the surrounding community. This sensitisation approach is intended to foster a better understanding and appreciation of their peers from both sides. “The centre and its football pitch is an oasis of protection for these children and young people who are confronted with poverty, violence and stigmatisation.” Aimable, Kabondo Kabondo Football for Hope Centre Manager Activities held at the Football for Hope Centre • Sports activities: daily psycho-social activities organised through football activities • Sensitisation activities: football is being used to sensitise children, young people and the community on protection themes affecting children • Educational activities: literacy classes for children and young adults • Access to health: consultation room to cover the basic health needs of street children For more information, please visit www.tdh.ch 13
  15. 15. FOOTBALL FOR HOPE CENTRE CENTRE HOST: UNITED ACTION FOR CHILDREN CAMEROON, MAMFE 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report14
  16. 16. “Through the Football for Hope Centre, FIFA has provided the children and young people of our community a place where they can get together to learn life skills that they will keep for their entire adult lives.” Besongabang Football for Hope Centre Programme Manager INNOVATIVE PROGRAMMES AND STRONG COMMUNITY HALT RURAL EXODUS The primary goal of the Besongabang Football for Hope Centre is to develop a caring society for children and young people using innovative programmes. Over 1,500 children and young people benefit from the activities each year, interacting with other people both on and off the pitch. They learn about the values of life and self- esteem and also receive support with their homework. The centre offers a place where: • Parents and teachers can take an active role in child development • The issue of school dropout and failure can be addressed by helping to rectify existing problems in the local education system • An alternative approach to education in Cameroon can be introduced • Good, affordable nursery and primary education is provided • Efforts are made to halt the rural exodus by building a strong community Children and young people facing problems of drugs and unemployment are at a higher risk of HIV/AIDS infection, which is why over 300 HIV consultancies take place each year at the centre. Committed volunteers provide testing and support as well as a referral system for children and young people who would otherwise not go to a clinic for care. For more information, please visit www.unitedactionforchildren.org 15
  17. 17. FOOTBALL FOR HOPE CENTRE CENTRE HOST: DELTA CULTURA CABO VERDE (DCCV) CAPE VERDE, SANTIAGO 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report16
  18. 18. “This centre is giving the young people of Tarrafal so much joy and happiness, but most importantly, it occupies their free time with something useful, precious and rewarding.” Tarrafal Football for Hope Centre volunteer THE PITCH BRINGS HUGE SMILES TO THE CHILDREN’S FACES Football has always been seen as the most popular sport in the world, and in Tarrafal this is no exception. With this new and first-of-its-kind centre in Tarrafal, young people are loving football even more and the facilities and programmes are attracting over 2,000 of them annually to benefit from many other activities involving life skills: • Football training, matches and tournaments aimed at bringing children and young people together • Homework groups, tutoring groups, IT classes, lectures, art workshops, online and offline research, language courses and professional training are also offered at the centre The Football for Hope Centre has brought many benefits to the community of Tarrafal. The infrastructure helps to empower children and young people by giving them the opportunity to cultivate their knowledge through reading, research and writing. It also provides them with satisfaction, pleasure, leisure, a purpose and a sense of achievement. The study and computer room and library are open to children and young people, providing both academic improvement and enjoyment. Thanks to Delta Cultura’s awareness of the importance of artistic activities to the development of creativity, imagination, self-confidence and much more, the centre’s offering has been expanded to include monthly painting workshops. For more information, please visit www.deltacultura.org/en 17
  19. 19. FOOTBALL FOR HOPE CENTRE CENTRE HOST: GEORGES MALAIKA FOUNDATION DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO, LUBUMBASHI 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report18
  20. 20. Whether through health sessions for family planning or malaria prevention, sport development sessions, teaching sustainable farming skills, environmental awareness or lessons on healthy eating and living, this centre is investing in the education and empowerment of girls. The activities aim to eliminate the barriers that prevent so many girls from exercising their right to a quality education, and to maintain a productive environment for young women to develop the skills and potential to become the leaders of the next generation. FOOTBALL PROMOTING POSITIVE COMMUNITY CHANGE IN KALEBUKA The Kalebuka Football for Hope Centre provides a nurturing and stimulating environment for young people and community members to connect, learn, develop socially and access valuable health services and education, while using football as a tool to transforming the community. A movement of youth leaders is being created in the village. Through creating impactful solutions to current challenges, they are learning to thrive while meeting their needs as well as those of their neighbours. “We have found a place where we could go to play and have fun, close to home, and are making a lot of new friends.” Girls from Kalebuka attending the Football for Hope Centre Six critical areas addressed by the Football for Hope Centre: • Health • Education (IT and literacy) • Enterprise development • Food security • Peer-to-peer training through football • Leadership and life skills through football drills Participants at the Kalebuka Football for Hope Centre play an active role in their own development. The aim of this approach is to break the cycle of poverty and allow girls and boys to become empowered while achieving development that is sustainable. For more information, please visit www.gmfafrica.org 19
  21. 21. FOOTBALL FOR HOPE CENTRE GHANA, CAPE COAST CENTRE HOST: PLAY SOCCER GHANA “It’s amazing how every time I come to the Oguaa Football for Hope Centre, I see how happily children and young people who live in the community and beyond fill the premises of the centre, while doing something useful with their time.” Oguaa Football for Hope Centre Programme Manager 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report20
  22. 22. “The Oguaa Football for Hope Centre in Ghana has really had a great impact on my life and the community, because as a person and a youth volunteer instructor in the ICT department, it has empowered me to revise, acquire and keep abreast of new knowledge and create a better future for myself and my family.” Youth volunteer instructor at Oguaa Football for Hope Centre BECOMING AGENTS OF CHANGE – EQUIPPING CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE WITH LIFE SKILLS When children learn to play football at the Oguaa Football for Hope Centre, they also learn social skills like teamwork, fair play, peaceful solutions to conflicts and health issues like HIV/AIDS and malaria prevention, good nutrition, hygiene and use of clean water. Each weekly session is a building block that encourages children to put these new skills into practice on the football pitch and in their daily lives at home and in the community. Youth volunteer instructors recruited from the community are trained and equipped to teach the programme. The Oguaaman Street League is a recreational football league programme at the Oguaa Football for Hope Centre that targets young adults aged between 16-25 who have dropped out of formal education. The league acts as a kind of safety net to enable disadvantaged young people to take part in the centre’s activities. In collaboration with the University of Cape Coast’s Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation, the centre recently organised a health fair providing free HIV/AIDS screening and medical advice to approximately 500 people living in the community and beyond. Day in, day out, the Centre Host organisation Play Soccer Ghana provides underserved 5-15-year-old girls and boys and 16-25-year-olds with access to skills and the physical activity they need to lead healthy lives, and engages young adults (youth volunteer instructors) in a community service that also enhances their own abilities and builds their future. For more information, please visit www.playsoccer-nonprofit.org 21
  23. 23. FOOTBALL FOR HOPE CENTRE CENTRE HOST: MATHARE YOUTH SPORTS ASSOCIATION (MYSA) KENYA, NAIROBI “Through the children’s love for football and football-related activities, Mathare Football for Hope Centre has provided a variety of options for our young people, many of which were not available before. It is the young people and children who own the centre.” Child of Nairobi who attends activities at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report22
  24. 24. Most of the beneficiaries come from neighbouring slum areas and have a very humble background. Lack of access to health amenities, after-school educational facilities and enough safe space for them to meet and interact are some of the challenges which these children and young people are facing in the community. The Football for Hope Centre has provided them a place where they can thrive. The Mathare Football for Hope Centre’s beneficiaries are young, being aged between 10 and 18 (65% male, 35% female). Whether they are attending school or not, they are offered the following activities, empowering them to fulfil their potential and improve their lives and that of their communities through sport: • Life skills • Football skills • Football matches, tournaments on the football turf pitch • School library visits • After-school tutorial programme • Screening of set books for secondary school students • Storytelling for young children who accompany their brothers and sisters to the centre • Voluntary HIV/AIDS counselling and testing services • Community outreaches (sports and health) Sport is used in combination with community outreach and development activities to give young people the skills and confidence they need to aim higher, achieve more and improve their lives. The centre is run by and for young people, building brighter futures. For more information, please visit www.mysakenya.org “I like to come to the centre because I can play on the pitch. The centre has also helped me and my friends because it is friendly, with various departments where we can pop in at any time, seek information as well as HIV/AIDS tests and obtain counselling.” Mangapi, young football player at Mathare Football for Hope Centre EMPOWERING YOUNG PEOPLE THROUGH SPORT 23
  25. 25. “Every time I need help, Kick4Life is always there to help.” 6-year child attending activities at Lesotho Football for Hope Centre FOOTBALL FOR HOPE CENTRE LESOTHO, MASERU CENTRE HOST: KICK4LIFE 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report24
  26. 26. The course aims to: • Educate young people on how to avoid HIV infection, including transmission, prevention, risk awareness and peer pressure • Diminish the stigma and discrimination surrounding HIV including counselling and testing, gender equality and support of people living with HIV • Empower young people with critical life skills including self-esteem, teamwork, discipline and decision-making “I became a role model, not just to participants, but also to my friends and every child in my village.” Rithamally coach at Lesotho Football for Hope Centre FOOTBALL IS TRANSFORMING THE LIVES OF SOME OF THE MOST DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN IN THE WORLD Kick4Life works with young Basotho people from a variety of backgrounds, with many programmes developed specifically to work with extremely vulnerable boys and girls aged between 10 and 24. These boys and girls face a range of issues including lack of health education, psycho-social support, employment opportunities, nutrition and housing. The centre is a hub of social and economic development and enterprise for the local community, a place where children and young people can come and take part in numerous activities and be inspired to pursue a brighter future for themselves and their country. COPING WITH THE WORLD’S THIRD-HIGHEST PREVALENCE OF HIV THROUGH FOOTBALL Lesotho has the world’s third-highest prevalence of HIV (23.6%) and more than 100,000 children have been orphaned. This has had a devastating impact on life expectancy, on family and community structures and on the economy. Hundreds of orphans and vulnerable young people regularly take part in activities at the Lesotho Football for Hope Centre. Ten thousand young people have been tested for HIV, with more than 350 requiring ongoing medical treatment. The programme is structured around the Kick4Life Curriculum, a health education and life skills course for young people aged between 12 and 18. Delivered by volunteer role models such as school teachers, sports coaches and peer educators, the curriculum includes a range of fun and interactive sports and classroom-based activities that carry important messages. For more information, please visit www.kick4life.org 25
  27. 27. FOOTBALL FOR HOPE CENTRE MALI, BAMAKO CENTRE HOST: ASSOCIATION MALIENNE POUR LA PROMOTION DE LA JEUNE FILLE ET DE LA FEMME (AMPJF) 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report26
  28. 28. GIVING YOUNG GIRLS AND BOYS THE BEST POSSIBLE OPPORTUNITIES FOR THEIR LIVES Through the Baguinéda Football for Hope Centre, girls from Mali are being giving tools to empower themselves in society. 80% of the young people who attend the activities at the centre are girls. They are often illiterate and do not attend school, and are either unemployed or have been forced into marriage at an early age. The centre is also a hub for boys, thus providing healthy life skills to both genders. At the centre, exchange and educational programmes work with girls, boys and parents to develop their awareness of gender issues. It also provides opportunities for young people at small local enterprises, learning valuable on-the-job skills. This is complemented by health, tutoring and IT skills at the centre. Football activities taking place on the Football for Hope pitch, especially those involving playing in a mixed team, promoting the girls’ self-esteem and mutual acceptance and tolerance between girls and boys. Due to the prevalence of HIV/AIDS in the region, the centre also provides a trusting environment for HIV testing. Gynaecological check-ups for girls and public health promotion are also offered by Baguinéda Football for Hope Centre. For more information, please visit www.ampjf-mali.org 27
  29. 29. FOOTBALL FOR HOPE CENTRE CENTRE HOST: GRUPO DESPORTIVO E RECREATIVO DE MANICA (GDM) MOZAMBIQUE, MANICA “The Football for Hope Centre has drawn attention to the work that GDM is doing, and the community respects the development and that this truly is a project for the people.” Chirara Local community head of Manica 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report28
  30. 30. HOW THE PITCH REDUCES THE SCHOOL DROPOUT RATE At the Manica Football for Hope Centre, the focus is on healthy living and a positive lifestyle where boys and girls enjoy life and have something to look forward to. Through its employability programme, young people are given new opportunities in life. Twenty young people are now in full-time employment as brick moulders after having been taught the necessary skills by the Architecture for Humanity design fellows during the construction of the Manica Football for Hope Centre. These are local customs which were dying out and have been revived thanks to the construction of the centre. In the drive to scale up HIV/AIDS programmes in Mozambique through prevention, treatment and care services, the Manica Football for Hope Centre is playing an important role. At the centre, health sessions are provided on HIV/AIDS as well as counselling. This is allowing young people and community members, to receive individual attention in a welcoming setting. Within a few months, 30% of those attending activities at the centre voluntarily tested for HIV/AIDS. The centre is a hub for helping young people to improve their leadership and responsibility skills. Whether through life-skills activities, gardening, planting or IT sessions, young people of Manica are thriving in a protective environment. The centre is also increasing girls’ participation, with more girls also being trained as football coaches. The pitch at the Manica Football for Hope Centre is not only a recreational ground where children and young people can enjoy playing, but also a place where they can receive support and encouragement to remain in school. The centre is aiming to lower the school dropout rate, and it has already had its first success stories. For more information, please visit www.fcmanica.com “The fact that the Manican community has been involved in building the Manica Football for Hope Centre gives me a real sense of ownership of the centre.” Manica Football for Hope Centre Manager 29
  31. 31. FOOTBALL FOR HOPE CENTRE CENTRE HOST: SPECIAL OLYMPICS NAMIBIA NAMIBIA, WINDHOEK “We used to come to the Football for Hope Centre in bare feet and very dirty, but now we are nice and clean. Our life skills teacher taught us about keeping our bodies clean. I like the centre very much.“ Roco, 13-year-old youth attending activities at Katutura Football for Hope Centre 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report30
  32. 32. SAFE HAVEN BRINGING TOGETHER YOUNG PEOPLE OF ALL BACKGROUNDS Special Olympics Namibia’s target group is young people, regardless of whether or not they have intellectual disabilities. The general problems facing young people in the community of Katutura are the high crime rate, alcohol and drug abuse and the high unemployment rate. The general expectations of those without intellectual disabilities is that they will eventually drop out of school, while those with such disabilities are not part of the community. Through the support of FIFA, the Football for Hope Centre has provided a place where young people of all backgrounds can come together. The Football for Hope Centre is a safe haven from the streets of Katutura, which are stricken with crime, alcohol and drug abuse. Through the centre’s core programmes, children and young people have an opportunity to improve their life skills and learn that there are other options beyond life on the streets. Thanks to the Yingli pitch lighting, it has been possible to set up community night leagues, keeping young people occupied during a time when they would otherwise be busy drinking and committing crime. Through the computer room in the centre, Special Olympics has trained young people to acquire basic computer skills, which has enabled them to get jobs. For more information, please visit www.specialolympics.org “I am a school dropout, but when I came to the Football for Hope Centre, it helped me gain a few skills in sports as well as in using a computer. Now I have something to give back to my community.“ Elton Katutura Football for Hope Centre volunteer 31
  33. 33. FOOTBALL FOR HOPE CENTRE CENTRE HOST: ASSOCIATION DES JEUNES SPORTIFS DE KIGALI – ESPÉRANCE RWANDA, KIGALI 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report32
  34. 34. RECONCILIATION EFFORTS IN RWANDA THROUGH FOOTBALL The Football for Hope Centre in Kigali contributes to the efforts of reconciliation and rehabilitation in Rwanda. By strengthening the skills of young people in the fields of non-formal learning, sport and culture, the centre promotes social inclusion as well as physical and psychological healing in the participants’ everyday life environment. Espérance enables young Rwandans to become community role models with leadership and vocational skills. Participants are not just educated – they are trained to be educators themselves. The Espérance organisation implements various innovative approaches at the centre: Gender-based violence (GBV) alleviation programme: Espérance‘s approach to fighting GBV is to raise awareness in the local community. The debate method provides plenty of scope for expressing ideas and concerns that can provide long-term solutions. Cineduc methodology training: This methodology applies the use of cinema to further education and critical thinking. The films are shown on a regular schedule and are followed by an audience discussion. It gives new perspectives to local children while providing an entertaining medium. Language courses: The aim of this programme is to improve the level of language comprehension for Espérance volunteers and to provide lessons to the students of Groupe Scolaire Kimisagara P5 and P6, as English is now being used as the language of instruction. Other international language classes given by Espérance volunteers include German and French. Talent development programmes: Football is and has always been the common denominator for all of the activities. The talent development programme aims to provide skilled football training for local children by qualified coaches. “Wash Your Hands” methodology: “Wash Your Hands” is a campaign initiated by the NGO- WASH United, which aims to end the global sanitation and hygiene crisis. The workshops are conducted by our volunteers in local partner schools to change attitudes and behaviour on neglected issues such as protozoa bacteria. Fighting the drug abuse behaviour: Drug abuse has been rampant among the young people of Rwanda and is one of the main causes of domestic violence. Statistics indicate that more than half of the country’s young people use drug substances on a regular basis. Various initiatives and joint actions against drug abuse are being organised with partners in schools and the community. Youth-friendly services: Espérance wants to provide services that are accessible and appropriate for adolescents. These programmes have been in place for a long time and are constantly being improved to make them more effective and affordable. It tries to meet the individual needs of young people, who in return recommend these services to friends and local youngsters. Capacity-building workshops: Using social media and publishing newsletters, magazines and reports requires a certain set of knowledge in specific programmes. Our volunteers are trained and updated on software that enables them to design specific assignments. For more information, please visit www.esperance.rw “At the Kimisagara Football for Hope Centre, I started by playing football. Then I joined the group of Espérance volunteers. And I got a group of girls to train in football. The centre helped me to improve my sports skills and also my English through English courses. I have learned to be patient and to appreciate what life offers.“ Nina Baziga Zena, female football player/coach at Kimisagara Football for Hope Centre 33
  35. 35. FOOTBALL FOR HOPE CENTRE SOUTH AFRICA, ALEXANDRA CENTRE HOST: GRASSROOT SOCCER (GRS) “The Alexandra Football for Hope Centre will first and foremost allow me to play more soccer, because as a girl in Alex I have often been prevented from playing with the guys. I also look forward to being able to implement our female-based Skillz Street and other programmes in a safe, fun and very cool environment.” Kelly, 12-year old girl attending activities at Alexandra Football for Hope Centre 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report34
  36. 36. “The Alexandra Football for Hope Centre will allow me to preach the positive and block out negative influences that otherwise run rampant in our community at present.” Lentwe, community project coordinator at Alexandra Football for Hope Centre CUTTING-EDGE FOOTBALL CURRICULUM IS MAKING AN EXTRAORDINARY IMPACT IN THE FIGHT AGAINST HIV/AIDS HIV prevalence among young people in South Africa is one of the highest in the world. At the Alexandra Football for Hope Centre, two key factors in the fight against HIV – HIV prevention and awareness among young people – are utilised as part of Grassroot Soccer’s Skillz curriculum, which is having an extraordinary impact on the fight against HIV/AIDS. The Skillz curriculum is a culture, a mindset and a toolkit for educators to use when teaching 12-18-year-olds about HIV and AIDS and life skills. The Skillz curriculum creates simple but powerful connections between football (sport) and life skills. The Skillz curriculum approach helps young people to engage in relevant and important discussions about life, take small steps to achieve their goals, be resilient when faced with challenges, and protect themselves and others from HIV and AIDS. The Skillz curriculum combines the following activities: Skillz Core: uses an activity-based approach to provide comprehensive HIV knowledge and reduce stigmatisation and discrimination. Generation Skillz: addresses key risk drivers, focusing mainly on gender norms, gender-based violence and adopting safer sexual behaviour. Skillz Street: female-focused intervention providing young women with reproductive health knowledge and a safe place in which to play football. Holiday Camp: programmes run during school holidays containing Skillz activities and football leagues that have a high coach-to-youngster ratio to maximise interaction. HCT Tournament: football tournament aimed at gathering a large number of community members while promoting testing, counselling and “know your status” messages. In the “risk field” activity, for example, participants dribble a football between cones representing HIV-related risks – multiple partners, drug/alcohol abuse, sugar daddies, etc. If one player hits a cone, he and his team- mates must complete three push-ups, showing how the consequences of one person’s risk can not only affect him, but also his friends, family and community. For more information, please visit www.grassrootsoccer.org 35
  37. 37. FOOTBALL FOR HOPE CENTRE SOUTH AFRICA, EDENDALE CENTRE HOST: WHIZZKIDS UNITED (WKU) “WhizzKids United gives children a place to be happy. The staff know that these children face tough times. WhizzKids helps children with HIV/AIDS and when a child has a problem at home, the counsellors really listen.” Youth attending activities at Edendale Football for Hope Centre 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report36
  38. 38. HIV/AIDS PREVENTION, CARE AND TREATMENT THROUGH FOOTBALL Young people in South Africa, particularly those living in disadvantaged areas, are confronted with a massive range of physical, social and economic struggles. Among South Africa’s 52 district municipalities, Mgungundlovu has the highest HIV prevalence rate among antenatal clinic clients (42.3%), the fourth-lowest condom distribution rate (five condoms per adult male per year) and the fifth-highest sexually transmitted infection (STI) incidence rate (6.5%) per year. In order to tackle this and many other health issues, the Edendale Football for Hope Centre includes not only a pitch where children and young people can come to enjoy a healthy lifestyle, but also a health academy. The health academy located at the Edendale Football for Hope Centre provides adolescents with a range of sexual and reproductive health services, which includes HIV counselling and testing, treatment of STIs, one-on-one sexual risk counselling, couple counselling, Anti-retroviral treatment and psycho-social support, and family planning and management. It also provides a support programme for orphans and vulnerable children. In addition, a range of recreational and educational programmes take place weekly at the academy, including arts and crafts, dance, a choir and a homework club. WhizzKids United is an interactive, youth-focused programme that uses the game of football to educate adolescents about life skills, gender equality, health, HIV and AIDS prevention. The mission is to deliver excellence in HIV and AIDS prevention, care, treatment and support to young people worldwide through the medium of football. It does so by fun football drills, such as: • Attacking the ball: teaching the importance of setting goals through the football drill of shooting • Finding your position: teaching the importance of defining oneself through the football drill of positional play • Knowing your opponent: teaching the importance of anticipating obstacles in one’s life through the football drill of dribbling • Protecting yourself: teaching the importance of HIV and AIDS protection through the football drill of defending • Controlling the game: teaching the importance of controlling sexual behaviour through the football drill of ball control • Choosing your tactics: teaching the importance of career and life planning through the football drill of tactical play For more information, please visit www.whizzkidsunited.org “When I came to the Football for Hope Centre, I was unemployed and I started as a volunteer. It provided me with the chance to learn skills and the opportunity to get trained as a counsellor. I feel my home is actually at the centre. It has affected me that much.” Volunteer at Edendale Football for Hope Centre 37
  39. 39. “Being at the centre has taught me a lot... I was scared to talk to people before. I knew that I was a good listener but I didn’t know I could listen to people the way I do now. Thanks to the centre, I’m able to support young people.” Poppi, community project coordinator at Khayelitsha Football for Hope Centre FOOTBALL FOR HOPE CENTRE SOUTH AFRICA, KHAYELITSHA CENTRE HOST: GRASSROOT SOCCER (GRS) 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report38
  40. 40. POPULARITY OF FOOTBALL REACHES OUT TO YOUNG PEOPLE TO SPREAD HIV/AIDS KNOWLEDGE At the Football for Hope Centre and on the pitch in Khayelitsha, football is being used to get the message out about healthy behaviour and the risks of HIV. Grassroot Soccer targets young people aged 12-25 who are at the highest risk of new HIV infection. Among this group, comprehensive HIV/AIDS knowledge, regular condom use and uptake of HIV and AIDS counselling and testing (HCT) and anti-retroviral therapy (ART) are relatively low. Using footballers as role models and using the popularity of football to reach young people, Grassroot Soccer combines years of experience with evidence-based strategies to implement multiple types of intervention, forming a diverse and powerful menu of programmes aimed at young people: Skillz Core: uses an activity-based approach to provide comprehensive HIV knowledge and reduce stigmatisation and discrimination. Generation Skillz: addresses key risk-drivers, focusing mainly on gender norms, gender-based violence and adopting safer sexual behaviour. Skillz Street: female-focused intervention providing young women with reproductive health knowledge and a safe place in which to play football. Holiday Camp: programmes run during school holidays containing Skillz activities and football leagues that have a high coach-to-youth ratio to maximise interaction. HCT Tournament: football tournament aimed at gathering a large number of community members while promoting testing, counselling, and “know your status” messages. Champions League: six-month football league for high-risk men that incorporates life skills programming, vocational training and incentives for pro-social behaviour. At the centre, young people in some of the most disadvantaged communities are trained via the “citizen journalism” video. They undergo an intensive course in all aspects of video production and the established hubs of digital film-making in the two township communities that produce community-focused films and raise awareness of social issues long after the 2010 FIFA World Cup™. The two Siyakhona media hubs in Khayelitsha and Alexandra created as a result of the programme have since become sustainable community enterprises. For more information, please visit www.grassrootsoccer.org “If it wasn’t for the centre, a lot of these kids wouldn’t have anything to do. They would be on the street. We know what they would be doing... but instead they are here.” Coach at Khayelitsha Football for Hope Centre 39
  41. 41. FOOTBALL FOR HOPE LOVELIFE Y-CENTRE CENTRE HOST: NEW LOVELIFE TRUST SOUTH AFRICA, KIMBERLEY 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report40
  42. 42. MAKING DECISIONS TODAY FOR A BETTER TOMORROW The Football for Hope Centre in Kimberley is providing an ideal site for the local youths to attend a variety of extra-curricular activities. The centre and its activities provide children and young people who lack employment opportunities and who are surrounded by poverty with the much-needed support. This commitment to working intensively with young people to help them confront their challenges and make the right decisions for their future, is key in this region of South Africa. The Football for Hope Centre is an oasis where LoveLife can interact effectively through football to support them. LoveLife is committed to working intensively with young people to help them confront their challenges and make the right decisions for their future. As an organisation, it believes that young people should realise that life is about making decisions today for a better tomorrow. Youth centres like the Kimberley Football for Hope LoveLife Y-Centre are places where young people can go to learn, grow and have fun. For more information, please visit www.lovelife.org.za/corporate 41
  43. 43. FOOTBALL FOR HOPE CENTRE SOUTH AFRICA, LIMPOPO CENTRE HOST: THE SOUTH AFRICAN RED CROSS SOCIETY 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report42
  44. 44. “The Football for Hope Centre has brought many opportunities to the community and surrounding areas, and the activities that are implemented at the centre enable people to access quality health and educational services.” Mogalakwena Football for Hope Centre Manager Through football, the South African Red Cross Society provides children with life skills and peer education. Workshops on social and health education surrounding the prevention and risk mitigation of HIV/AIDS are fundamental to the daily running of the Football for Hope Centre. Psycho-social support is also provided by experienced staff, combined with performing arts and literacy classes to get more and more community members involved. Children from the age of four up to adulthood attend the activities held at the Mogalakwena Football for Hope Centre. The challenges that this community is facing are unemployment, poverty, high rate of school dropouts, child-headed families and HIV/AIDS. These challenges are dealt with by the following activities: • “Soccer Against Crime” • HIV/AIDS awareness and education • Youth development • Voluntary HIV counselling and testing Many of the young people who attend the Football for Hope Centre are faced with various challenges, including being orphaned at a young age due to losing parents to AIDS, and are consequently now running child- headed households while caring for siblings, attending school and seeking part time employment. Trained peer educators at the centre support these young people by stimulating their development through sport, peer support, counselling and life skills. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org.za 43
  45. 45. “We used to play on a dusty football pitch called Lehlakeng, where it was dangerous, but now we have a beautiful pitch where we can even fall over without any fear of getting hurt.” 9-year old girl attending activities at QwaQwa Football for Hope Lovelife Y-Centre FOOTBALL FOR HOPE LOVELIFE Y-CENTRE SOUTH AFRICA, QWAQWA CENTRE HOST: NEW LOVELIFE TRUST 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report44
  46. 46. “LoveLife could have chosen any place in QwaQwa to build the centre, but they brought it to our village, and this shows the love and commitment it has for young people in rural communities.” School teacher in QwaQwa community LIFE IS ALWAYS ON PLAY AND NEVER ON PAUSE The geographical setting of QwaQwa village makes for an impressive site, as the landscape is beautiful and still has a natural feel to it. However, because of the distance between the village and the main business area, the village does not have easy access to youth development programmes and services. The Football for Hope Centre in this area has partly managed to bridge that space, as social support services are available to young people through LoveLife’s call centre and also through its partnership with the Department of Social Development. The partnership between the centre and the Department of Health has enabled the latter to provide clinical services at the centre, where young people can access HIV/AIDS services without fear of stigmatisation. Children and young people who lack employment opportunities and are surrounded by poverty may succumb to the pressures of transactional sexual intercourse, further exposing them to the risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. Young men are also tempted into committing crimes ranging from murder to theft and burglary. In addition, the young people and children who come to the centre are often illiterate and prone to teenage pregnancy, since they do not have a sense of purpose in life. LoveLife is committed to working intensively with young people to help them confront their challenges and make the right decisions for their future. As an organisation, it believes that young people should realise that life is about making decisions today for a better tomorrow. Youth centres like the QwaQwa Football for Hope LoveLife Y-Centre are places where young people can go to learn, grow and have fun. For more information, please visit www.lovelife.org.za/corporate 45
  47. 47. FOOTBALL FOR HOPE TANZANIA, IRINGA CENTRE HOST: IRINGA DEVELOPMENT OF YOUTH, DISABLED AND CHILDREN CARE (IDYDC) 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report46
  48. 48. “The centre increases skills and creates behavioural change by providing health and social education to young people and the community in order to improve their living standards, using football as a tool for development.” Iringa Football for Hope Centre Manager IMPARTING KNOWLEDGE ON AND OFF THE FIELD The main objective of the Football for Hope Centre in Tanzania is to promote social development in the community by running programmes which deal with increasing awareness about HIV/AIDS, increase literacy, improve gender equality, integrate young people with intellectual disabilities and promote overall social development in other targeted ways. The centre targets over 3,000 children and young people aged 5-24, both male and female. This group includes children and young people who are both attend and have dropped out of school, street children, orphans and vulnerable children. The centre identifies the most vulnerable children and empowers the needy and vulnerable by providing entrepreneurship skills which help with finding employment. It also connects young unemployed people with the vocational training centre so that they can acquire employable skills. Children, young people and the community are also supported by the centre in raising awareness regarding HIV/AIDS and alcohol and drug abuse in the community. Coaches, students and volunteers become educators on and off the field, imparting knowledge in areas such as healthcare and children’s rights. The centre’s work serves as an exemplary model for neighbouring regions and organisations that have followed similar paths. In conjunction with its football programmes, the centre provides vocational training courses, distributes health-related leaflets and offers counselling services and micro-financing programmes to communities. Activities at the Football for Hope Centre • Training on HIV/AIDS, alcohol and drug abuse for young people • Role-play exercises relating to HIV/AIDS, alcohol and drug abuse • Development and dissemination of training manuals and materials on HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted illnesses, alcohol and drug abuse • Courses on football rules and regulations for team coaches, referees and team players • Youth festivals and community events • Internet services, library services and audiovisual presentations • Live radio broadcasts of events For more information, please visit www.idydc.blogspot.de 47
  49. 49. FOOTBALL FOR HOPE CENTRE ZIMBABWE, LUVEVE CENTRE HOST: GRASSROOT SOCCER (GRS) 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report48
  50. 50. “I’ve learned a lot in terms of the benefits of going for HIV testing and counselling during one of the tournaments held near the centre. It is exciting to realise that we are being encouraged to take ownership of the programmes that are going to be at the centre as they are meant to serve us as young people.” Bulawayo Football for Hope Centre volunteer Some facts and figures • Over 1,000 young people are being helped to stay at school • Over 250 young people and community members have been tested in the VCT tournament. This also makes the VCT services more accessible to the communities so that more people know their status and more HIV-positive people are provided with access to treatment In Luveve Township, more than 50% of the population is under the age of 35, and unemployment rate is estimated at 80% for young men and even higher for young women. High unemployment, an underlying factor in the spread of HIV, particularly among young people (the most vulnerable group when it comes to HIV), often leads to alcohol and drug abuse. In order to tackle these social challenges, the Football for Hope Centre provides the following activities: • Skillz curriculum and the girls-only Skillz Street programme • Voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) tournaments, which bring health services like HIV testing, male circumcision, and family planning to the community. The visibility and status of the centre will encourage utilisation of health services from the community as well as attract local organisations to work alongside GRS • Peer educator programme where exceptional young people are identified and mentored by the Centre Host coaches to become young leaders • Using the services and expertise of local organisations to benefit the community. In addition, community input is leveraged to help tailor some of the programming that the community needs The construction of the Bulawayo Football for Hope Centre has enthused not only the Grassroot Soccer Zimbabwe fraternity and Luveve community but the whole of Bulawayo as a town. It presents a unique opportunity for interaction between young people, whether they attend school or not. It also bridges the divide between young people and their guardians/parents, strengthening parent-to-child communication on sexual reproductive health and other developmental issues. The centre is improving the quality of its HIV-prevention programming, collaborating more effectively with community stakeholders and health services partners and educating and mentoring more young people in Zimbabwe. For more information, please visit www.grassrootsoccer.org 49
  51. 51. 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report50
  52. 52. PROJECT STAKEHOLDERS In creating and constructing the 20 Football for Hope Centres across Africa, FIFA worked together with a number of specialist stakeholders, without whom the achievement would not have been possible: Centre Hosts: Association Malienne pour la Promotion de la Jeune Fille et de la Femme (AMPJF), Delta Cultura Cabo Verde, Espérance – Association des Jeunes Sportifs de Kigali, Georges Malaika Foundation, Grassroot Soccer, Grupo Desportivo e Recreativo de Manica, Iringa Development of Youth, Disabled and Children Care, Kick4Life, LoveLife, Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), Play Soccer Ghana, South African Red Cross Society, South East District Youth Empowerment Association (SEDYEA), Special Olympics Namibia, Sport – the Bridge, Terre des hommes/Giriyuja, United Action for Children, WhizzKids United. FIFA Partners: adidas, Coca-Cola, Hyundai/Kia Motors, Emirates, Sony, and VISA Yingli Green Energy has provided state-of-the-art solar technology for the 20 Football for Hope Centres. The company has been involved right from the start in the planning of the centres, analysing requirements and providing and installing custom photovoltaic system solutions. Thanks to the solar installations, the centres are not dependent on public utility suppliers and always have sufficient energy. streetfootballworld is a social profit organisation that promotes positive change through football. It has worked hand in hand with FIFA since the creation of Football for Hope and is responsible for managing the construction and implementation of the 20 centres, as well as of collaborating with the Centre Hosts to ensure the centres’ sustainability. Architecture for Humanity is a charitable organisation that services communities in need. It coordinated the design and the construction of the Football for Hope Centres through a number of design fellows. GreenFields is a leader in the construction and development of synthetic turf systems. It supplied the football turf pitches and field boards for all the Football for Hope Centres. Football associations from Burundi, Mali, Cape Verde, Ghana, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, Mozambique, Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Lesotho and South Africa. The Football for Hope Centres would also not have been possible, without the commitment and support from all the local communities and governments.   51
  53. 53. YINGLI BRINGS SOLAR ENERGY TO AFRICA ENERGY FOR “It has been Yingli Green Energy’s mission to contribute to a better and more sustainable future right from the beginning. The ‘20 Centres for 2010’ campaign gave us the chance to combine this with our passion for football makes our involvement in this extraordinary project the most natural thing in the world for us.” Mrs. Judy Tzeng Lee Vice-President of Global Marketing 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report52
  54. 54. As part of its global sponsorship of the 2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa™, “Yingli Green Energy known as “Yingli Solar”, collaborated with FIFA in the creation of the 20 Football for Hope Centres across the African continent. Yingli was involved right from the start in the planning of the centres, analysing requirements and providing and installing customised photovoltaic (PV) system solutions. Thanks to these PV installations, some of the centres are independent of the grid. Others use solar energy for pitch lighting to facilitate evening football practice. All Football for Hope Centres were given a choice of solar packages, including: • Stand-alone lighting for football pitches • Water pumping and storage • PV power system As the world’s largest solar panel manufacturer, Yingli Solar has produced more than 30 million solar modules for homes, businesses and power plants, which is the equivalent of five fossil fuel or nuclear power plants. In 2012, Yingli modules offset 200 million tons of CO2. Social responsibility is one of the pillars of Yingli Green Energy’s core values. The company is engaged in a variety of social projects around the world, aiming to make solar power a sustainable and cost-effective energy source for everyone. Yingli Solar provided solar power in one form or another to all 20 centres, with 258 solar modules installed totalling 23kWp. The solar pitch lighting system was one of the most requested and appropriate PV solutions for the centres. The benefits are evident: • Illumination of the football pitch for more than three hours after dark, 365 days a year • No maintenance required as the systems are very robustly designed • The system allows the centre greater flexibility in its opening hours, so that children and young people can utilise advanced renewable energy to play football in a safer and more comfortable environment “This feels like a dream. I can’t express how happy I am to see a centre like this being opened in my community. We are facing many challenges, like poverty, gender inequality and limited access to education, and a lot of people here don’t believe they can ever become something or add value to their society. But projects such as this empower and help us learn to respect ourselves and each other.” Mavis Augustina Student from the FFH Centre in Manica, Mozambique “The different solar packages provided such as pitch lighting essentially extend the utilization of the centre and allows many more young people access to its benefits. We feel proud to be a key partner of the ‘20 Centres for 2010’ campaign and to leave a tangible social legacy for Africa far beyond the 2010 FIFA World Cup™. Our mission is to make green energy a sustainable and cost-effective energy for all, and the building of the 20 centres is a great step forward towards this goal.” Mr. Liansheng Miao Chairman and CEO of Yingli Green Energy 53
  55. 55. $14.75 million The total investment by FIFA into the “20 Centres for 2010” 20 Centres for 2010 / Final Report54
  56. 56. BY FIFA FIFA has been funding the entire project since 2007, including providing the necessary financial resources for staffing, development and construction of the centres and programmes. In addition to a basic investment of USD 9 million, FIFA allocated their disciplinary fines from the 2010 FIFA World Cup™ qualifiers and finals of over USD 2.5 million to the project plus USD 975,000 from the 2010 FIFA World Cup™ public viewing revenues. The proceeds from “Listen Up! The Official 2010 FIFA World Cup Album” – in excess of USD 2.3 million – have also been allocated by FIFA and Sony Music to the campaign. At least three years of programme funding after construction has been completed is guaranteed by FIFA, as well as a maintenance fund for Centre Hosts to keep the infrastructure up to date. $9million basic investment (USD) $2.5 million disciplinary fines from the 2010 FIFA World CupTM $2.3 million $975 thousand proceeds from “Listen Up! The Official 2010 FIFA World Cup Album from the 2010 FIFA World Cup™ public viewing revenues. 55
  57. 57. Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) FIFA-­Strasse 20, P.O. Box, 8044 Zurich, Switzerland Tel: +41 (0)43 222 7777 Fax: +41 (0)43 ­222 7878 www.FIFA.com Proudly supporting Football for Hope

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