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Public Speaking_Rojhe

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  1. 1. PUBLIC SPEAKING School of Business Management Shoolini University ROJHE Public Speaking 1
  2. 2. PUBLIC SPEAKING & PRESENTATION • Similarities are pretty obvious. Both involve one person talking to a group of people. The people listening are sitting down, facing the speaker, and passively listening. • The person speaking is working hard to say something to the listeners, and has probably worked hard to prepare her thoughts and materials. ROJHE Public Speaking 2
  3. 3. • So, when do you speak and when do you present? • First, it helps to know the difference. A presentation typically employs visual aids to convey data; a speech relies on words alone to create feeling and imagery in the minds of the listeners. • A presentation is generally the best vehicle for conveying specific, detailed information. Ideally, clear, uncomplicated visuals display the data that prove or support the presenter's points • A speech is more appropriate for striking larger themes and conveying emotion, with a greater dependence on language to convey ideas "visually. • The first difference is that we don’t see visuals in a speech. The speaker strives to paint a picture in the mind of the audience, but he’s doing it with words, not with images on a screen. DIFFERENCES…. ROJHE Public Speaking 3
  4. 4. DIFFERENCES……. Speech Presentation • Informal • Smaller crowd • More detailed explanation • presentations often require a deep, narrow focus • Speeches can be made to persuade or entertain, but not to inform. Presentations can do all three — inform, persuade, and entertain. • Managers and technical experts give presentations. • Speeches are more formal than presentations. • Speeches are given to larger crowds, and therefore must to appeal to the emotions. • The larger the crowd, the less complex the material should be. • Speeches require broad vision. • CEOs and thought leaders give speeches. Of course this is an oversimplification, but it evokes the distinction I’m making. ROJHE Public Speaking 4
  5. 5. LETS PONDER • Here’s a very very short (30 second) speech by Bryan Dyson, CEO of Coca Cola. It’s short but one of the most effective and true speeches ever delivered by a CEO. Guess what the speech pertains to… Professional development? Working overtime? Nope. Check it out! • “Imagine life as a game in which you are juggling some five balls in the air. Name them – Work, Family, Health, Friends & Spirit. You are keeping all of them in the air. You will soon understand that work is a rubber ball. If you drop it, it will bounce back. But the other four balls – Family, Health, Friends and Spirit – are made of glass. If you drop one of these, they will be irrevocably scuffed, marked, nicked, damaged or even shattered. They will never be the same. You must understand that and strive for it.” • So guys, there’s something beyond our work. Work efficiently during office hours and leave on time. Have proper rest and give the required time to your family and friends. ROJHE Public Speaking 5
  6. 6. PRACTICE BEFOREHAND • You would do better practicing in the shower, and running through the speech in your head, than practicing in front of a mirror, which is distracting," says Jane Praeger. "You do have to practice out loud, hopefully with a small audience." Practice replacing deadening filler words like "um," "so," and "like" with silence. If you can rehearse in the space where you'll be speaking, that's a real plus. Go to the back of the room, imagine that you're deaf or distracted, and you'll know how to reach those people. ROJHE Public Speaking 6
  7. 7. WORK THE ROOM • Try to speak to audience members before your speech, so that you can focus on a few friendly faces. • Focus on Quadrants ROJHE Public Speaking 7
  8. 8. PREPARE WITH RELAXATION TECHNIQUES • If you're nervous before approaching the stage, take a few deep breaths. • Picture yourself delivering a successful speech. "Most people will be nervous for the first few minutes," ROJHE Public Speaking 8
  9. 9. DON'T READ YOUR SPEECH • Tell your speech from heart, or use a note card with bullet points as a cheat sheet. • Bring the card with you and place it on the lectern. • If you freeze up mid-speech, you can take a deep breath, look at your card, and know exactly what story you're going to tell next. ROJHE Public Speaking 9
  10. 10. STAND UP STRAIGHT • Whether you walk across the stage or stand behind a lectern, try to maintain good posture ROJHE Public Speaking 10
  11. 11. LEAD WITH AN ANECDOTE • Jump right in. • People often make the mistake of starting speeches by thanking the introducer, or expressing their happiness at being there. • "Instead, jump right in with a framing story that suggests what the topic is without giving it all away, a statistic, a question or some kind of interaction with the audience," says Nick Morgan. • If you know what your speech is about--and it should be about one thing--you should have an easy time deciding on an opening. Get right into the story and let the audience know what the speech will be about. ROJHE Public Speaking 11
  12. 12. KEEP IT SIMPLE • Forget fancy PowerPoint presentations and loads of data. Focus on one theme and eliminate everything else. • "People don't remember much of what they hear, so focus and keep it simple." The best speeches include one clear, relevant message and a few great stories to illustrate that message ROJHE Public Speaking 12
  13. 13. KEEP IT SHORT • "I think a speech should not be more than ten minutes long," says Praeger. "Five to seven minutes is ideal." • If you're aiming for seven minutes, your prepared speech should run shorter than that so that you can factor in extra time for pauses and audience responses ROJHE Public Speaking 13
  14. 14. USE BODY LANGUAGE THAT MAKES YOU APPEAR COMFORTABLE • If you show signs of nervousness, like • crossing your arms, • clutching your hands in front of your stomach, • "You have to pretend that you're having a good time and are open to the audience so that they can have a good time and be open back to you, • "Successful public speaking is all about passion and emotion. If you're excited, then we will be, too." ROJHE Public Speaking 14
  15. 15. HIDDEN CAUSES OF PUBLIC SPEAKING STRESS • Thinking that public speaking is inherently stressful (it's not). • Thinking you need to be brilliant or perfect to succeed (you don't). • Trying to impart too much information or cover too many points in a short presentation. • Having the wrong purpose in mind (to get rather than to give/contribute). • Trying to please everyone (this is unrealistic). • Trying to emulate other speakers (very difficult) rather than simply being yourself (very easy). • Failing to be personally revealing and humble. • Being fearful of potential negative outcomes (they almost never occur and even when they do, you can use them to your advantage). • Trying to control the wrong things (e.g., the behavior of your audience). • Spending too much time overpreparing (instead of developing confidence and trust in your natural ability to succeed). • Thinking your audience will be as critical of your performance as you might be. ROJHE Public Speaking 15
  16. 16. KEY PRINCIPLES TO ALWAYS KEEP IN MIND • #1---Speaking in Public is NOT Inherently Stressfu • l#2---You Don't Have to be Brilliant or Perfect to Succeed • #3---All You Need is Two or Three Main Points • #4---You also Need a Purpose That is Right for the Task • #5---The Best Way to Succeed is NOT to Consider Yourself a Public Speaker! • #6---Humility and Humor Can Go a Long Way • #7---When You Speak in Public, Nothing "Bad" Can Ever Happen! • #8---You Don't Have to Control the Behavior of Your Audience • #9---In General, the More You Prepare, the Worse You Will Do • #10--Your Audience Truly Wants You to Succeed ROJHE Public Speaking 16
  17. 17. • Doubts & Questions ROJHE Public Speaking 17

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