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TITLE(PART 1): WASH in Schools – An Introduction(PART 1): WASH in Schools – An Introduction
World Water e-Summit
Rotary & ...
Welcome to the webinar
Sandra (Sandy) Forster, Past District Governor District 5810
Co-Chair World Water Summit 2016 – Seo...
Thank you, World Water Summit sponsors
Wasrag appreciates the support of major sponsors to the World Water Summits: Fundac...
Agenda
• Water & Sanitation Rotarian Action Group
• Greg Allgood
• Nancy Gilbert
• Q/A
Water & Sanitation Rotarian Action Group | WHO?
• Rotarians committed to support Rotary clubs
for sustainable contribution...
Water & Sanitation Rotarian Action Group | WHO?
• 1650+ members
• Global: 92 countries, 320 Rotary districts
• Membership ...
POLL
Meet our panelists
Nancy Gilbert
Past District Governor
International Development Consultant
Rotary Club of West Shore (Vi...
WASH in Schools
Global Water Crisis
• Every day, nearly 1,000 children
under 5 die from diarrhea
caused by contaminated water,
poor sanita...
Women and Girls
• The global water crisis has a
greater impact on women
and girls who typically fetch
and manage water in ...
World Vision’s Commitment to WASH
• Invested $400 million from 2010-2015 to address the
global water crisis and reach 7.5 ...
Why Wash in Schools
• Lives are transformed by providing
WASH, education, health including
deworming, and nutrition in sch...
Poverty is Complex
• Work in communities to help
them address not only WASH
but variety of challenges.
• Schools are a foc...
Best practices - Water
Provide access to water
through right-sized hardware
equipment based on water
source and provide wa...
Best practices - Sanitation and Hygiene
Combine clean water with sanitation and hygiene
interventions such as helping brin...
Feminine Hygiene
Girls in rural sub-Saharan Africa miss an average 5 days a
month of school during menstruation and do not...
Access for the most Vulnerable
• Ramps and improved
access at water points.
• Tools that aid in water
collection.
• Disabi...
Sustainable Solutions
Use a model that stresses community ownership.
Important components include:
• Water committees to m...
Why WASH in Schools?
‘Children have indeed proved to be effective change agents
for hygienic practices, such as washing of...
WASH in Schools
• Planning
• Selecting partners
• Appropriate
technologies
• Monitoring and
evaluation
WASH in Schools - Planning
What will “success” look like?
When we have been successful with a WASH in
Schools program not ...
WASH in Schools - Planning
Planning for “success”:
Providing hardware is the easy part;
What is much more difficult, takes...
WASH in Schools - Planning
• Proper assessment and thorough understanding of
needs
• Plan for hardware and software needs…...
WASH in Schools - Planning
• School selection – importance of long term
sustainability
• Fully understand the needs and as...
WASH in Schools - Planning
• Teachers
oIs there a lot of turn over (quite common)?
If yes, how to ensure knowledge is reta...
WASH in Schools - Planning
Criteria For Sanitation:
•A water point within the school premises or in the community.
•Democr...
WASH in Schools - Planning
“While all schools may be sensitized, the selection process should not only
identify schools th...
WASH in Schools - Planning
• Government standards re ratios
o Urinals: Boys and girls
• Menstrual Hygiene Management: MHM
...
Planning tips and Resources
• WHO Guidelines on ratios of students and
teachers to toilets
• Consider country guidelines.
...
Girls’ Urinal
Days for Girls
Provides information
on education and re-
usable kits that can
last as much as 3
years
31
Low...
32
• Urinals – integrated approach – liquid used as
fertilizer; plants located immediately behind urinals
with pipes takin...
WASH in Schools - Planning
Operation & Maintenance
• What resources are available to provide technical
support?
• How will...
WASH in Schools – Choosing Partners
Why should a Rotary Club partner with an
NGO?
• Knowledge of subject area (WASH) and t...
WASH in Schools – Choosing partners
Why would an NGO partner with a Rotary
Club?
• Local knowledge
• Source of funds
• Pos...
WASH in Schools – Appropriate Technologies
WATER:
• Is there a water source?
• Quality?
• Sedimentation/Filtration
• Safe ...
WASH in Schools – Appropriate Technologies
SANITATION:
• WASRAG Sanitation Guide
• Other resources: SMART Centers,
Appropr...
WASH in Schools – Appropriate Technologies
Hygiene Education:
• WASRAG Hygiene Guide (www.wasrag.org)
• Many online resour...
WASH in Schools – Monitoring & Evaluation
Monitoring and Evaluation:
• Ensure early agreement on both the
mechanisms for r...
Questions?
WASH series
2015 World Water e-Summit 2:
WASH in Schools – beyond toilets and tap:
Behavior change through hygiene educati...
Water and Sanitation Rotarian Action Group
• Become a WASRAG member! Lack of WASH is an
affront to humanity. Help the Rota...
Wasrag’s World Water Summit 8 | Seoul, Korea
Wasrag’s World Water Summit 8
Friday, May 27th
, 2016
Seoul, Korea
Registrati...
Thank you!
Register for upcoming webinars and
access recordings of past webinars at
www.rotary.org/webinars
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2015 WASH e-Summit (Part 1): An Introduction to Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) in Schools

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View the recording: https://vimeo.com/142525709
Brought to you by Rotary and the Water and Sanitation Rotarian Action Group, this first of three webinars provides an overview of WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene education) in Schools programs.

New to WASH in Schools? Join sector experts to learn about the importance of WASH in Schools efforts and the various hardware and software components that make these club and district-led projects impactful and sustainable.

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2015 WASH e-Summit (Part 1): An Introduction to Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) in Schools

  1. 1. TITLE(PART 1): WASH in Schools – An Introduction(PART 1): WASH in Schools – An Introduction World Water e-Summit Rotary & WASRAG 15 October 2015
  2. 2. Welcome to the webinar Sandra (Sandy) Forster, Past District Governor District 5810 Co-Chair World Water Summit 2016 – Seoul, Korea Wasrag Board Member – 2013-2016 Wasrag Management Team Member – 2014-2016 Rotary Club of Dallas Uptown, Texas, USA
  3. 3. Thank you, World Water Summit sponsors Wasrag appreciates the support of major sponsors to the World Water Summits: Fundación Avina, Procter & Gamble (Children’s Safe Drinking Water Program), Sunspring Innovative H2O, The Rotarian, Triple Quest, Water Missions International, and World Vision.
  4. 4. Agenda • Water & Sanitation Rotarian Action Group • Greg Allgood • Nancy Gilbert • Q/A
  5. 5. Water & Sanitation Rotarian Action Group | WHO? • Rotarians committed to support Rotary clubs for sustainable contributions to WASH projects • A group of technical experts who assist clubs and districts with water, sanitation, and hygiene projects – Rainwater harvest, toilets and sanitation systems, wells and boreholes, dams and aquifers, sand filters, entrepreneurship, building capacity and partnerships, WaSH education programs for communities and more….
  6. 6. Water & Sanitation Rotarian Action Group | WHO? • 1650+ members • Global: 92 countries, 320 Rotary districts • Membership is open to Rotarians, family members of Rotarians, Rotary program participants and alumni
  7. 7. POLL
  8. 8. Meet our panelists Nancy Gilbert Past District Governor International Development Consultant Rotary Club of West Shore (Victoria), B.C., Canada Greg Allgood Vice President World Vision Seattle, WA. USA
  9. 9. WASH in Schools
  10. 10. Global Water Crisis • Every day, nearly 1,000 children under 5 die from diarrhea caused by contaminated water, poor sanitation, and improper hygiene. • Worldwide, 663 million people lack access to clean water. • More than 80 percent of people without water access live in rural areas.
  11. 11. Women and Girls • The global water crisis has a greater impact on women and girls who typically fetch and manage water in the home. • Providing clean water and improved sanitation and hygiene transforms lives, particularly of women and girls.
  12. 12. World Vision’s Commitment to WASH • Invested $400 million from 2010-2015 to address the global water crisis and reach 7.5 million people. • World Vision is the largest nongovernmental provider of clean water in the developing world —reaching one new person with clean water every 30 seconds.
  13. 13. Why Wash in Schools • Lives are transformed by providing WASH, education, health including deworming, and nutrition in schools. • Children are change agents for entire communities. • CDC study in Kenya showed 2.5x increase in use of household water treatment in homes based on school program and 26% reduction in absenteeism that was sustained a year later.
  14. 14. Poverty is Complex • Work in communities to help them address not only WASH but variety of challenges. • Schools are a focal point not only for WASH but education, health, and improved nutrition. • Comprehensive approach enables communities to lift themselves out of poverty.
  15. 15. Best practices - Water Provide access to water through right-sized hardware equipment based on water source and provide water access close to schools and clinics. For example: •Heavy-duty rigs used for drilling deep wells. •Mechanized wells with solar pumps used for high-yield
  16. 16. Best practices - Sanitation and Hygiene Combine clean water with sanitation and hygiene interventions such as helping bring about behavior changes for the greatest impact. •Handwashing and hygiene promotion in schools. •Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) leading to Open Defecation Free (ODF) certification. • Provision of latrines in schools and clinics.
  17. 17. Feminine Hygiene Girls in rural sub-Saharan Africa miss an average 5 days a month of school during menstruation and do not understand why they are menstruating. •Separate latrines needed for girls. •Private space to wash with soap and dry cloths are needed to prevent infections. •Penetration of commercially available sanitary pads is significant (20%) in rural areas of East African countries but affordability an issue. •Disposal issues for sanitary pads may require incineration.
  18. 18. Access for the most Vulnerable • Ramps and improved access at water points. • Tools that aid in water collection. • Disability-adapted sanitation facilities.
  19. 19. Sustainable Solutions Use a model that stresses community ownership. Important components include: • Water committees to maintain water points and collect user fees. • Local mechanics trained to repair water pumps. • Supply chain for parts. • Enabling local government to support when we leave.
  20. 20. Why WASH in Schools? ‘Children have indeed proved to be effective change agents for hygienic practices, such as washing of hands, using latrines and maintaining hygienic environments generally. Moreover, children who adopt good hygiene practices at a young age not only work as peer advocates but are also likely to grow-up to be health conscious adults, while transferring the knowledge, skills and practices to the rest of their families.’ (CASSAD, 2005; UNICEF, 2007)
  21. 21. WASH in Schools • Planning • Selecting partners • Appropriate technologies • Monitoring and evaluation
  22. 22. WASH in Schools - Planning What will “success” look like? When we have been successful with a WASH in Schools program not only have facilities been upgraded, but practices have changed and knowledge is embedded about: •properly use, maintenance, and repair of systems •New practices - for example handwashing, use of toilets, MHM… have been adopted consistently, correctly, and continuously •No one has been left behind
  23. 23. WASH in Schools - Planning Planning for “success”: Providing hardware is the easy part; What is much more difficult, takes more planning, and longer term support is addressing the software – behavior change - needs
  24. 24. WASH in Schools - Planning • Proper assessment and thorough understanding of needs • Plan for hardware and software needs… – Hardware – technical issues – Software – hygiene education, Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM), behaviour change – how to change Knowledge Attitudes and Practices required for a succesful program – Why aren’t children attending school? Is it more than WASH issues?
  25. 25. WASH in Schools - Planning • School selection – importance of long term sustainability • Fully understand the needs and assess whether this school is a good candidate to invest in: – People/committees – to support long term behavior change: oParent/teacher committee oSchool management committee oLocal gov’t; community oBoard of education
  26. 26. WASH in Schools - Planning • Teachers oIs there a lot of turn over (quite common)? If yes, how to ensure knowledge is retained at the school. oBenefits of school/community clubs? (good for supporting behaviour change) oLevel of awareness and interest – what capacity building will be needed? oRole for Rotary? • Security situation – impact on siting & selection
  27. 27. WASH in Schools - Planning Criteria For Sanitation: •A water point within the school premises or in the community. •Democratically elected, gender balanced and functioning/active parents-teachers association (PTA) and school based management committee (SBMC). •Willingness to contribute financially for the maintenance. •Agreement by at least three teachers to take on responsibilities for planning, monitoring, construction and maintenance activities as well as for hygiene education in the school. •Willingness of school, community and pupils to be part of implementation and maintenance of the facilities. •- excerpted from a Technical Guide for Construction of School Sanitation Facilities developed by UNICEF in Nigeria.
  28. 28. WASH in Schools - Planning “While all schools may be sensitized, the selection process should not only identify schools that have applied for participation in the project, but also schools that have demonstrated convincing ability to participate in the planning, construction and management of the facilities as well as in the education of the pupils in the proper use of the facilities. Such schools should stand better chance of being selected for participation in the project.” …Because they will adopt and support behavior change more readily
  29. 29. WASH in Schools - Planning • Government standards re ratios o Urinals: Boys and girls • Menstrual Hygiene Management: MHM o Considerations – what age are the students? • Local customs and practices o Wipers v. washers o Concept of “success” i.e. are flush toilets the only acceptable option? How can we change that perception?
  30. 30. Planning tips and Resources • WHO Guidelines on ratios of students and teachers to toilets • Consider country guidelines. • Remember the use of urinals for both boys and girls. • A great example can be found in the Nigeria Technical Guide, page 27.
  31. 31. Girls’ Urinal Days for Girls Provides information on education and re- usable kits that can last as much as 3 years 31 Low-cost sanitation options
  32. 32. 32 • Urinals – integrated approach – liquid used as fertilizer; plants located immediately behind urinals with pipes taking liquid into ground; • Fruit trees grew much faster; Low-cost sanitation options
  33. 33. WASH in Schools - Planning Operation & Maintenance • What resources are available to provide technical support? • How will repairs and maintenance be funded? • How to embed knowledge? • Role of students, teachers, parents etc. • How can the knowledge and habits developed at the school be duplicated in the community? • Unique role Rotary Clubs can play.
  34. 34. WASH in Schools – Choosing Partners Why should a Rotary Club partner with an NGO? • Knowledge of subject area (WASH) and tools for training (behavior change etc.) various stakeholders, • Expertise in implementation; e.g. at WWS7 Literacy Rotarian Action Group (LitRag) breakout was focused on ways teachers could weave hygiene education into many other subject areas – writing, art etc. – expanding impact • Available full time • May have other sources of funds
  35. 35. WASH in Schools – Choosing partners Why would an NGO partner with a Rotary Club? • Local knowledge • Source of funds • Possible source of volunteers • Can build deep relationship with beneficiaries • Long-term project support
  36. 36. WASH in Schools – Appropriate Technologies WATER: • Is there a water source? • Quality? • Sedimentation/Filtration • Safe storage • WASRAG water guide
  37. 37. WASH in Schools – Appropriate Technologies SANITATION: • WASRAG Sanitation Guide • Other resources: SMART Centers, Appropriate Technology Centers, • Technology Applicability Framework (TAF)
  38. 38. WASH in Schools – Appropriate Technologies Hygiene Education: • WASRAG Hygiene Guide (www.wasrag.org) • Many online resources • CAWST.org • UNICEF NEXT WEEK: WASH in Schools – beyond toilets and tap: Behavior change through hygiene education Wednesday, 20 October, 10:00-11:00 Chicago time
  39. 39. WASH in Schools – Monitoring & Evaluation Monitoring and Evaluation: • Ensure early agreement on both the mechanisms for reporting, the indicators to report on, and the targets for each agreed-upon indicator. • Presents an opportunity for Rotary Clubs – they have a long-term presence (hopefully!), build solid relationships and can keep in touch regularly.
  40. 40. Questions?
  41. 41. WASH series 2015 World Water e-Summit 2: WASH in Schools – beyond toilets and tap: Behavior change through hygiene education Wednesday, 20 October, 10:00-11:00 Chicago time Learn from sector experts about creating sustainable hygiene behavior change, a crucial component of successful WASH in School projects, to bring about lasting community improvements. Panelists: PDG Juan Simon, Lima (Peru), Water Missions International Sarah Fry, Washington, DC (USA), Hygiene Program Advisor of WASHplus
  42. 42. Water and Sanitation Rotarian Action Group • Become a WASRAG member! Lack of WASH is an affront to humanity. Help the Rotary family help others. • Join us to combat this global crisis. www.wasrag.org
  43. 43. Wasrag’s World Water Summit 8 | Seoul, Korea Wasrag’s World Water Summit 8 Friday, May 27th , 2016 Seoul, Korea Registration will open by end of October; visit www.wasrag.org.
  44. 44. Thank you! Register for upcoming webinars and access recordings of past webinars at www.rotary.org/webinars

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