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2016 ROTARY INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION
WATER AND SANITATION GLOBAL GRANTS FROM
CONCEPT TO FUNDING BREAKOUT SESSION
MODERATOR
Trustee Thomas Thorfinnson
Incoming Water and Sanitation Major Gifts Initiative Chair
District 5950, USA
PANELISTS
Ramesh Aggarwal F. Ronald (Ron) Denham Ph.D.
District 3012, India District 7070, Canada
PANELISTS
John Nyombayire Nicholas Mancus
District 9150, Rwanda District 9220, Benin
Rotarians around the world are involved in projects
that support investments in infrastructure and
people to create measur...
• Increasing water supply and distribution (for
example, rainwater harvesting, water storage,
wells and boreholes)
• Impro...
• Provide scholarships related to water, sanitation,
hygiene
• Supply vocational training
• Conduct training with communit...
• WASH in Schools
• RI-USAID International H2O Collaboration
SPECIAL INITIATIVES
WATER
SANITATION
HYGIENE
WASH IN SCHOOLS (WinS) TARGET CHALLENGE
EDUCATION
LITERACY
• India
• Kenya
• Belize
• Honduras
• Guatemala
Focal Countries• Launched on 1st Jan 2016 ending Jun 2018
• Water and Sani...
• Gender-segregated
toilets
• Daily group
handwashing &
Teacher training in
handwashing
TIER-1
• Gender-segregated
toilets...
• SMC is functional
• Low cost point of use treatment of
drinking water
• Gender segregated sanitation facilities
• Daily ...
• Meeting National Standards
• Facilities used by all children (No Open
Defecation)
• MHM plan implemented via
infrastruct...
• Transference of behavior change and
outreach to the community
• Secure resources for improved WASH
conditions Meeting WH...
Partnerships
WASH IN SCHOOLS (WinS) TARGET CHALLENGE
The partnership between Rotary and USAID focuses
on providing access to infrastructure,
strengthening delivery of WASH ser...
PARTNERING FOR IMPACT – BUILDING ON OUR STRENGTHS
• Global network of influence
that can advocate for WASH
• Ability to co...
PARTNERING FOR IMPACT – BUILDING ON OUR STRENGTHS
WASH
Implementation
AdvocacyInnovation
Projects intended
to have larger
...
PARTNERING FOR IMPACT – FOCAL COUNTRIES
• Focal Countries: Ghana,
Uganda and Madagascar
• Governed by a national
Rotarian ...
PARTNERING FOR IMPACT – GHANA – SCHOOLS & HOSPITALS
WASH
Implementation
AdvocacyInnovation
• Rotarians/USAID -
constructio...
WASH COMMUNITY ASSESSMENTS - METHODS
1) Gather perspectives from a broad cross-section of the
community
2) Allow community members to identify the needs they
p...
5) Identify and map current WASH infrastructure
6) Identify and characterize health and hygiene
behaviors currently practi...
Results should:
•Describe how the community’s resources will be
utilized for the project
•Describe how the project will me...
TOP 5 GLOBAL GRANT
SUSTAINABILITY REQUIREMENTS
TOP 5 GLOBAL GRANT SUSTAINABILITY REQUIREMENTS
5. Financial Management Plan for infrastructure,
education and training
TOP 5 GLOBAL GRANT SUSTAINABILITY REQUIREMENTS
4. Operations and Maintenance Planning
TOP 5 GLOBAL GRANT SUSTAINABILITY REQUIREMENTS
3. Alignment of project with government standards,
guidelines and initiativ...
TOP 5 GLOBAL GRANT SUSTAINABILITY REQUIREMENTS
2. Hygiene education and training for behavior change
TOP 5 GLOBAL GRANT SUSTAINABILITY REQUIREMENTS
1. Community-based decision making, demonstrated
investment and buy-in for ...
1. Community-base decision making,
demonstrated investment and buy-in for
proposed WASH initiatives
2. Hygiene education a...
WATER AND SANITATION MAJOR GIFTS INITIATIVE
(WAS∙MGI)
• The AOF∙MGI will launch 1 July 2016
• Priority roll out of the Areas of Focus will be as
follows:
1. Water and Sanitatio...
• A goal of $25 million per Area of Focus
• Focus on outright and planned gifts of $100,000
and up
• Key fundraising compo...
2016-17 WATER AND SANITATION MAJOR GIFTS INITIATIVE COMMITTEE
Tom Thorfinnson, Chair (USA)
Young Suk Yoon, Vice Chair (Kor...
• $500,000- Customized Global Grant pick three
1. Activity
2.Area of focus
3.District
4.Geographic location
• $250,000- Cu...
• $15,000- Supports one or more global grants for an area
of focus.
• $30,000- One or more global grants for an area of fo...
• Be informed
• Spread the word
• Participate
CALL TO ACTION
Rate this session! Your feedback is valuable so remember to
complete the brief session evaluation in the convention
mobile...
Safe and Sustainable Water Assessment
•Soil erosion, deforestation
•How is the ecology (arid, semi
arid, temperate, hilly,...
End to End Solution
Financing water /Training/ teaching and Learning
Community engagement in
supporting the water of the
s...
General presentation of Rwanda
Size: 26,338 sq.
km
Population: 10.5
million
Life expectancy: 66.2
years (F); 62.6 years
(M...
References
• https://wsp.org/sites/wsp.org/files/publications/CSO-rwanda.pdf
• http://www.care.org/sites/default/files/doc...
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Water and Sanitation Global Grants from Concept to Funding (EN)

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Convenient access to clean water allows people to lead more
productive, happier lives. Learn about the types of water
and sanitation projects that qualify for global grant funding,
and get tips for building a successful application. We’ll also
discuss ways to support this area of focus by giving to
The Rotary Foundation.

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Water and Sanitation Global Grants from Concept to Funding (EN)

  1. 1. 2016 ROTARY INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION WATER AND SANITATION GLOBAL GRANTS FROM CONCEPT TO FUNDING BREAKOUT SESSION
  2. 2. MODERATOR Trustee Thomas Thorfinnson Incoming Water and Sanitation Major Gifts Initiative Chair District 5950, USA
  3. 3. PANELISTS Ramesh Aggarwal F. Ronald (Ron) Denham Ph.D. District 3012, India District 7070, Canada
  4. 4. PANELISTS John Nyombayire Nicholas Mancus District 9150, Rwanda District 9220, Benin
  5. 5. Rotarians around the world are involved in projects that support investments in infrastructure and people to create measurable and enduring improvements in water, sanitation and hygiene. They can: • Provide access to safe water • Improve sanitation and hygiene conditions • Implement sustainable water and sanitation systems • Provide scholarships related to water and sanitation INTRODUCTION TO WATER AND SANITATION PROJECTS
  6. 6. • Increasing water supply and distribution (for example, rainwater harvesting, water storage, wells and boreholes) • Improving water quality (purification) • Providing hygiene education • Supplying waste management • Enhancing water, sanitation, and hygiene conditions in schools and communities COMMON WATER AND SANITATION PROJECTS
  7. 7. • Provide scholarships related to water, sanitation, hygiene • Supply vocational training • Conduct training with communities to establish water, sanitation and hygiene committees COMMON WATER AND SANITATION PROJECTS CONT.
  8. 8. • WASH in Schools • RI-USAID International H2O Collaboration SPECIAL INITIATIVES
  9. 9. WATER SANITATION HYGIENE WASH IN SCHOOLS (WinS) TARGET CHALLENGE EDUCATION LITERACY
  10. 10. • India • Kenya • Belize • Honduras • Guatemala Focal Countries• Launched on 1st Jan 2016 ending Jun 2018 • Water and Sanitation and Basic Education and Literacy areas of focus • Multi Level Recognition (3-Star Approach) • Designed by UNICEF and GIZ • Designed to be replicated • Measurable Outcomes • High Profile Issue • Target educational outcomes through improved sanitation and hygiene resources • Emphasis on keeping girls in school ROTARY WASH IN SCHOOLS TARGET
  11. 11. • Gender-segregated toilets • Daily group handwashing & Teacher training in handwashing TIER-1 • Gender-segregated toilets • Daily group • handwashing & Teacher training in handwashing TIER-2 • Defecation free zone • Teacher training in hygiene and menstrual hygiene • Gender-segregated toilets • Daily group handwashing & Teacher training in handwashing • WHO Standards are met & plans in place • WASH lessons integrated into classroom curriculum • Defecation free zone • Teacher training in hygiene and menstrual hygiene TIER-3 SUSTAINABILITY STAIRCASE
  12. 12. • SMC is functional • Low cost point of use treatment of drinking water • Gender segregated sanitation facilities • Daily supervised group handwashing with soap • Daily supervised cleaning of toilets • Training of teachers to teach & demonstrate hand washing • O&M & MHM plan created One Star School RECOGNITION By District Governor RI THREE STAR APPROACH - SIMPLE • SCALABLE • SUSTAINABLE
  13. 13. • Meeting National Standards • Facilities used by all children (No Open Defecation) • MHM plan implemented via infrastructure environment • Training of teachers in hygiene and MHM education • Follow-up with students for improved attendance Two Star School RECOGNITION By Rotary International RI THREE STAR APPROACH - SIMPLE • SCALABLE • SUSTAINABLE
  14. 14. • Transference of behavior change and outreach to the community • Secure resources for improved WASH conditions Meeting WHO Standards • Regular maintenance of the installed facilities is measured • SMC monitors if schools are meeting national standards • WASH lessons integrated into classroom curriculum Three Star School RECOGNITION By Rotary International RI THREE STAR APPROACH - SIMPLE • SCALABLE • SUSTAINABLE
  15. 15. Partnerships WASH IN SCHOOLS (WinS) TARGET CHALLENGE
  16. 16. The partnership between Rotary and USAID focuses on providing access to infrastructure, strengthening delivery of WASH services, promoting hygiene education and behavior change and mobilizing communities and resources in developing countries. PARTNERING FOR IMPACT – WHAT WE DO
  17. 17. PARTNERING FOR IMPACT – BUILDING ON OUR STRENGTHS • Global network of influence that can advocate for WASH • Ability to convene multiple participants and investors • Leaders of civil society representing multiple industries – including government • Vocational expertise in water, sanitation and hygiene • Technical expertise in international development • Working relationships with governments • Rigorous approaches to sustainability, monitoring and evaluation
  18. 18. PARTNERING FOR IMPACT – BUILDING ON OUR STRENGTHS WASH Implementation AdvocacyInnovation Projects intended to have larger scale and higher likelihood of sustainability
  19. 19. PARTNERING FOR IMPACT – FOCAL COUNTRIES • Focal Countries: Ghana, Uganda and Madagascar • Governed by a national Rotarian steering committee and USAID Mission • $4 million per focal country ($2 million Rotary: $2 million USAID) • www.rotary.org/riusaid • erica.gwynn@rotary.org
  20. 20. PARTNERING FOR IMPACT – GHANA – SCHOOLS & HOSPITALS WASH Implementation AdvocacyInnovation • Rotarians/USAID - construction water supply, sanitation facilities, handwashing stations • USAID - training and education for behavior change • USAID – governance and financial management training for WASH Committees • Rotarians – supplemental mentorship in governance and financial management • Rotarians – utilizing social media for coordination of partnership activities and collect stories from the field • Rotarians/USAID mobilizing financial resources from local government for WASH
  21. 21. WASH COMMUNITY ASSESSMENTS - METHODS
  22. 22. 1) Gather perspectives from a broad cross-section of the community 2) Allow community members to identify the needs they perceive as most critical to address 3) Ask community participants how they can contribute to the proposed project 1) What technical knowledge and skills already exists? 4) Collaborate with community members to identify long term goals and anticipated project outcomes WASH COMMUNITY ASSESSMENTS - METHODS
  23. 23. 5) Identify and map current WASH infrastructure 6) Identify and characterize health and hygiene behaviors currently practiced  e.g. Do they wash their hands at critical times? 7) Identify the current level of knowledge that exists around water, sanitation, hygiene 8) Identify current governing bodies that may already exist that would be responsible for future WASH services, finances, etc. of the community.  Are they functional? WASH COMMUNITY ASSESSMENTS - METHODS
  24. 24. Results should: •Describe how the community’s resources will be utilized for the project •Describe how the project will meet the needs identified by the community •Describe the long term goals/project outcomes and how they will be met (i.e. through training, awareness campaign) •Describe how the community will sustain the project after the grant-term has ended WASH COMMUNITY ASSESSMENTS - RESULTS
  25. 25. TOP 5 GLOBAL GRANT SUSTAINABILITY REQUIREMENTS
  26. 26. TOP 5 GLOBAL GRANT SUSTAINABILITY REQUIREMENTS 5. Financial Management Plan for infrastructure, education and training
  27. 27. TOP 5 GLOBAL GRANT SUSTAINABILITY REQUIREMENTS 4. Operations and Maintenance Planning
  28. 28. TOP 5 GLOBAL GRANT SUSTAINABILITY REQUIREMENTS 3. Alignment of project with government standards, guidelines and initiatives
  29. 29. TOP 5 GLOBAL GRANT SUSTAINABILITY REQUIREMENTS 2. Hygiene education and training for behavior change
  30. 30. TOP 5 GLOBAL GRANT SUSTAINABILITY REQUIREMENTS 1. Community-based decision making, demonstrated investment and buy-in for proposed WASH initiative
  31. 31. 1. Community-base decision making, demonstrated investment and buy-in for proposed WASH initiatives 2. Hygiene education and tainting for behavior change 3. Alignment of project with government standards, guidelines and initiatives 4. Operations and maintenance plan 5. Financial management plan for infrastructure, education and training TOP 5 GLOBAL GRANT SUSTAINABILITY REQUIREMENTS
  32. 32. WATER AND SANITATION MAJOR GIFTS INITIATIVE (WAS∙MGI)
  33. 33. • The AOF∙MGI will launch 1 July 2016 • Priority roll out of the Areas of Focus will be as follows: 1. Water and Sanitation 2. Basic Education and Literacy 3. Disease Prevention and Treatment AREA OF FOCUS MAJOR GIFTS INITIATIVE (AOF∙MGI)
  34. 34. • A goal of $25 million per Area of Focus • Focus on outright and planned gifts of $100,000 and up • Key fundraising components include 1. Communications 2. Events 3. Personal solicitations • AOF∙MGI Committee to drive cultivation and solicitation activities AREA OF FOCUS MAJOR GIFTS INITIATIVE GOALS
  35. 35. 2016-17 WATER AND SANITATION MAJOR GIFTS INITIATIVE COMMITTEE Tom Thorfinnson, Chair (USA) Young Suk Yoon, Vice Chair (Korea) Ron Denham (Canada) Herve Hacard (France) Antonio Hallage (Brazil) Bimal Kantaria (Kenya) Vinay Kulkarni (India) Pam Russell (USA) John Smarge (USA) Sankoo Yun (Korea) Karien Ziegler (USA)
  36. 36. • $500,000- Customized Global Grant pick three 1. Activity 2.Area of focus 3.District 4.Geographic location • $250,000- Customized Global Grant pick two 1. Activity 2. Area of focus 3. District 4. Geographic location • $150,000- Global Grant activity new • $25,000- Area of Focus general support fund ENDOWED GLOBAL GRANT NAMING OPPORTUNITIES
  37. 37. • $15,000- Supports one or more global grants for an area of focus. • $30,000- One or more global grants for an area of focus, district, and geographical location can be added. • $150,000- One or more global grants for two areas of focus. Districts and geographical location can be added. TERM GLOBAL GRANT NAMING OPPORTUNITIES
  38. 38. • Be informed • Spread the word • Participate CALL TO ACTION
  39. 39. Rate this session! Your feedback is valuable so remember to complete the brief session evaluation in the convention mobile app. To download the app, search for “Rotary Events” in your Apple or Android app store. This presentation and others from throughout the convention are available through the convention mobile app and on SlideShare at www.SlideShare.net/Rotary_International.
  40. 40. Safe and Sustainable Water Assessment •Soil erosion, deforestation •How is the ecology (arid, semi arid, temperate, hilly, rain forest) •Are there policies ie to provide water to communities? •Recycle, reuse water • Source of water (borehole, rivers, streams (occasional, salty water, recycled water •Kind of rocks in some areas (can a borehole be sank) •Location of the intervention city, suburbs, rural communities • Cultural belief system (ie girl child impact stratification of labor) • Knowledge based sharing of work or responsibilities • Improved community citizenship awareness (civic) • Demographic of the community (age, sex, education) • Educational level (Training) • Communication – (language used) • Historic practices (source water is it sacred) • Is the solution affordable • What is the economic activities of the community (farming, nomadic, fishing) • Education of the community (who can manage the proposed solution) • Encourage innovation to improve the economy of the community • Community led development Economic Factors Sociological Factors Ecological Factors Geological factors
  41. 41. End to End Solution Financing water /Training/ teaching and Learning Community engagement in supporting the water of the solution, accountability by having a water board in every community Inform Policies supporting Delivery and of clean water (sustainable goals)
  42. 42. General presentation of Rwanda Size: 26,338 sq. km Population: 10.5 million Life expectancy: 66.2 years (F); 62.6 years (M), Both Sex 64.5 Pop. Growth rate(2002-12): 2.6% GNI per capita: $630 Divisions: 30 Administrative Districts Languages: Kinyarwanda, English and French Source : EICV 4; MIS/WASAC,
  43. 43. References • https://wsp.org/sites/wsp.org/files/publications/CSO-rwanda.pdf • http://www.care.org/sites/default/files/documents/Sustainability- Report-Eth-Moz-Uganda.pdf • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_37itZMGsZU • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWSkFSyrppw

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