Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Le téléchargement de votre SlideShare est en cours. ×

Cutting through false dualisms: Transformative social change as a moral framework for psychological research

Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Chargement dans…3
×

Consultez-les par la suite

1 sur 71 Publicité

Cutting through false dualisms: Transformative social change as a moral framework for psychological research

Télécharger pour lire hors ligne

My doctoral qualifying exam, which was an oral presentation...
In the paper, I think deeply about the moral dimension of psychological research, while drawing from Buddhism, phenomenology, and critical psychology.

My doctoral qualifying exam, which was an oral presentation...
In the paper, I think deeply about the moral dimension of psychological research, while drawing from Buddhism, phenomenology, and critical psychology.

Publicité
Publicité

Plus De Contenu Connexe

Diaporamas pour vous (20)

Similaire à Cutting through false dualisms: Transformative social change as a moral framework for psychological research (20)

Publicité

Plus récents (20)

Publicité

Cutting through false dualisms: Transformative social change as a moral framework for psychological research

  1. 1. Cutting through false dualisms: Transformative social change as a moral framework for psychological research Robert Beshara
  2. 2. Absolute truth (the ontology of transformation) Relative truth (the epistemology of social change) The two truths doctrine is nondual, nonreductionist, and transmodern
  3. 3. Hume Dilthey Husserl Brentano
  4. 4. Science, what is it all about? Techmology, what is that all about?
  5. 5. Wisdom
  6. 6. Psyche and Eros
  7. 7. The holographic Mind
  8. 8. Selfas homunculus
  9. 9. Self as body
  10. 10. Primordial awareness
  11. 11. The Unconscious
  12. 12. Meditation
  13. 13. Scientific modernity in the Age of Enlightenment
  14. 14. Psyche as mind… as a function of brain
  15. 15. Deism: “Forget God, let’s focus on Nature”
  16. 16. Exploitation
  17. 17. Ecological crises
  18. 18. Charles W. Tolman’s moral philosophy • Values: Highly subjective, individualized, and particular. • Ethics: Standards of conduct, usually in restricted spheres; prudential. • Morality: Objective, social, and universal.
  19. 19. The moral law of karma
  20. 20. The mind-body problem
  21. 21. Cartesian Dualism
  22. 22. Monisms: physicalism, reflexive monism, dialectical monism, double-aspect theory, etc.
  23. 23. Empirical Pluralism
  24. 24. The subject-object problem
  25. 25. The noumenon (the thing-in-itself) and the phenomenon
  26. 26. Other (false) dualisms consciousness the unconscious The West (us) The East (them) Judeo-Christianity Islam Self Other Rationalism (deduction) Empiricism (induction) Modernity Postmodernity Quantitative Qualitative Science (knowledge) Philosophy (wisdom) Critical Transpersonal Noumenon Phenomenon Samsara Nirvana
  27. 27. The two truths doctrine • Absolute truth: the ontology of transformation • Relative truth: the epistemology of social change • Absolute truth + relative truth = the axiology of transformative social change
  28. 28. The ontology of transformation
  29. 29. The 5 skandhas/aggregates 1. Form (body) 2. Feelings (sensations) 3. Perceptions 4. Mental/karmic formations (51 of them) 5. Consciousness (8 of them)
  30. 30. The 8 layers of consciousness 1. Body + touching = tactile consciousness 2. Eyes + seeing = visual consciousness 3. Ears + hearing = auditory consciousness 4. Nose + smelling = olfactory consciousness 5. Tongue + tasting = gustatory consciousness 6. Mind + thinking = mental consciousness 7. Manas-vijñ na (dualistic consciousness)ā 8. Alaya-vijñ na (aka storehouse/substrate consciousness),ā where our karmic seeds are stored. “[T]he psyche is conditioned by the body and its physical interaction with the environment , but it emerges from the substrate consciousness" (Wallace, 2007, pp. 15-16). The 18 dh tusā : 6 sense organs + 6 sense objects = 6 consciousnesses
  31. 31. Primordial awareness "In contrast to the substrate consciousness, which can be viewed as the relative ground state of mind, according to the Great Perfection, primordial consciousness (jñ na) is characterized as the absolute state ofā consciousness. This state of perfect symmetry-- internally undifferentiated in terms of any concepts or qualities--entails the lowest possible state of mental activity, with the highest possible potential and degree of freedom. While the substrate consciousness is aware of the substrate--the relative inner space of the mind-- the primordial consciousness is indivisibly aware of the absolute space of phenomena (dharmadh tu), whichā
  32. 32. Buddha-nature: the embodiment of primordial awareness "the buddha-nature (tath gatagarbha) [whichā is our true nature] is 'brightly shining and pure, and originally pure, but it appears impure as it is defiled by adventitious stains and is enveloped by the skandhas, dh tusā , and soiled with the dirt of attachment, hatred, delusion, and compulsive ideation'" (cited by Wallace, 2007, p. 98).
  33. 33. I think, therefore… I think, therefore… To be or not to be… That is not the question! I am not!
  34. 34. The epistemology of social change On the dualistic nature of grammar: "A quantum of force is just such a quantum of drive, will, action, in fact it is nothing but this driving, willing and acting, and only the seduction of language (and the fundamental errors of reason petrified within it), which construes and misconstrues all actions as conditional upon an agency, a 'subject', can make it appear otherwise. [...] the common people separates lighting from its flash and takes the latter to be a deed, something performed by a subject, which is called lightning [...]. But there is no such substratum; there is no 'being' behind the deed, its effect and what becomes of it; 'the doer' is invented as
  35. 35. Social constructionism
  36. 36. Richard Rorty
  37. 37. Paul Feyerabend
  38. 38. Jacques Derrida
  39. 39. Critical discursive psychology
  40. 40. Embodiment/affect
  41. 41. Maurice Merleau-Ponty
  42. 42. The axiology of transformative social change
  43. 43. Critical discursive psychology
  44. 44. Social constructionism
  45. 45. Relational Buddhism
  46. 46. The bodhisattva ideal: The researcher as scholar-practitioner-activist
  47. 47. Critical media psychology
  48. 48. Liberating discourses and practices

×