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Reiss Motivation Profile

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Reiss Motivation Profile

  1. 1. Understanding your Reiss Motivation Profile
  2. 2. Confidential Who Am I: My Reiss ProfileName (0004): Jane+SampleAge: 55, Gender FReiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 1
  3. 3. General information on your Reiss Profile®Deep down, what makes people happy and satisfied with their lives and, thus, productive on a sustainablebasis? Success, wealth, career, family, or something else?What is most important to you? What do you want from life? What aspects of your life are most meaningful toyou?Who are you?Professor Steven Reiss answered these questions in a unique way: He asked thousands of people fromdiverse cultures and stations in life about their intrinsic motives. Surprisingly, scholars spent centuriesstudying human nature, but until now nobody had conducted large scale surveys of human purposes anddeeply rooted psychological needs.Based on decades of study, Reiss learned that we are driven by 16 basic strivings or desires that are deeplyrooted in human nature and intrinsic to all of us. These goals are common not only to all people but also toour nearer relatives in the animal world -- goals such as food; shelter from danger, the company of ourfellows; triumph over our opponents, and leadership among our companions.All psychologically important purposes, strivings, and motives appear to be reducible to the 16 basic desiresor to combinations among them. These 16 basic desires give rise to personality and reveal values.By means of the 16 basic desires, and unlike any other personality assessment, the Reiss Motivation Profile®provides a comprehensive picture of who you are. The results identify which motives are most important toyou and suggests how these motives play out at work, home, and in relationships.The Reiss Motivation Profile® is supported by peer reviewed scientific research published in the best quality journals. Asummary of scientific evidence appears in tables in Chapter 2 of Professor Reisss book, "The Normal Personality: ANew Way of Thinking about People" (available from www.amazon.com). The list of 16 basic desires is the firstempirically- derived taxonomy of human needs.Reiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 2
  4. 4. The 16 Basic Desires of Human Nature Acceptance, the desire to avoid failure and criticism. Beauty, the desire for aesthetic appealing experiences. Curiosity, the desire for understanding. Eating, the desire for food. Expedient, the desire to act out of self-interest. Family, the desire to raise children and spend time with siblings. Idealism the desire for social justice. Interdependence, the desire to trust others to meet ones needs. Order, the desire for to be organized and clean. Physical activity, the desire for muscle exercise. Power, the desire for influence or leadership. Saving, the desire to collect. Social contact, the desire for peer companionship. Status, the desire for respect based on social standing. Tranquility, the desire to be free of anxiety and pain. Vengeance, the desire to confront those who offend.* The business, school, sports, and health versions have no questions about romance and substitute insteada scale for Beauty.Reiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 3
  5. 5. 16 basic desires make us individuals and determine our psychological needs. Although everybody embracesall 16 basic desires, we differ considerably in how we rank order and combine them. Your rank ordering of the16 basic desires is shown in the results box on this page.Included in this report are plain English paragraphs suggesting how your results might be interpreted. Onlystrong and weak desires are interpreted. These results are based on statistical probabilities. In the finalanalysis, you must decide which of the results are valid in your case and which are invalid.The following is your Reiss Profile expressed in standard scores. The numbers in parenthesis refer tothe interpretative paragraphs (see following pages).Desire Score Color NarrativeAcceptance +1.08 Green (1)Beauty -0.11 YellowCuriosity +0.83 Green (2)Eating -0.19 YellowExpedient -1.06 Red (3)Family +0.59 YellowIdealism -0.12 YellowInterdependence -1.98 Red (4)Order -2.00 Red (5)Physical Exercise -1.05 Red (6)Power +0.38 YellowSaving +0.66 YellowSocial Contact +0.99 Green (7)Status -0.89 Red (8)Tranquility -0.65 YellowVengeance +0.54 YellowReiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 4
  6. 6. Weak Average Strong Desire Desire Acceptance (+1.08) (+1.08) Acceptance Beauty (-0.11) (-0.11) Beauty Curiosity (+0.83) (+0.83) Curiosity Eating (-0.19) (-0.19) Eating Expedient (-1.06) (-1.06) Expedient Family (+0.59) (+0.59) Family Idealism (-0.12) (-0.12) IdealismInterdependence (-1.98) (-1.98) Interdependence Order (-2.00) (-2.00) OrderPhysical Exercise (-1.05) (-1.05) Physical Exercise Power (+0.38) (+0.38) Power Saving (+0.66) (+0.66) Saving Social Contact (+0.99) (+0.99) Social Contact Status (-0.89) (-0.89) Status Tranquility (-0.65) (-0.65) Tranquility Vengeance (+0.54) (+0.54) VengeanceReiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 5
  7. 7. Acceptance (1)Strong Desire, score of +.80 or higher ( +1.08)Since you scored high for acceptance on the Reiss Motivation Profile®, you may be more sensitive to failureand criticism than is the average person. Many people with a high need for acceptance are tuned in andsensitive to what other people think and say about them.Nobody likes to be criticized, of course, but people with this need have a tendency to take negative feedbackpersonally and/or to overreact. Nobody likes to fail, but people with this need tend to take setbacks harderthan most people do.The following is a general description of how a high need for acceptance might motivate you and might playout in your career or work. Typically people with this need show only some of these behaviors. You shouldpick and choose which ones apply to you.Many people with a high need for acceptance are insecure. Some doubt themselves. Some wish they weremore self-confident. When things go wrong, some are quick to think it was their fault.As part of their effort to avoid situations in which they might experience failure, criticism, or rejection, somepeople with this need settle for less than what they really want in life. To minimize the chance of failure, sometake an easy job rather than try to succeed at a job that is both more rewarding and challenging. Some arereluctant to ask for a pay raise out of fear of being turned down. When thinking about starting a new business,some may worry that the business wont be successful and decide not to try. Many people with this needrequire encouragement to pursue challenging goals to reach their potential.Many individuals with a high need for acceptance become nervous when they are evaluated, judged, ortested. At work, many become anxious when they are evaluated for pay raises or promotions. Some mayinterview poorly. Many have difficulty working for a supervisor who judges them, who proclaims highstandards for work products, who yells at them, or who is quick to criticize them.Some people with a high need for acceptance lack inner conviction of their own worth. They feel worthy whenothers accept or praise them, but feel sad or devastated when others reject or criticize them.Some people with this need view the glass as "half empty" rather than "half full." Many worry about whatmight go wrong rather than what might go right. Some are pessimistic about the future. Many are attentive tosigns that things are going poorly and slow to notice progress. Some feel unworthy of success. Some areuncomfortable with positivity.A high need for acceptance leads to inconsistent effort and performance. Since failure hurts less when we donot try, some people who are worried about doing poorly hold back effort. Some try hard on days when theyfeel confident of success but not on days when they are worried about doing poorly. When you notice, say, anathlete or performer who is very inconsistent, doing well sometimes but poorly other times, odds are that theperformer has a high need for acceptance.To improve the consistency of their performances, people with a high need for acceptance should build theirReiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 6
  8. 8. self-confidence. They might benefit from greater use of positive thinking. When negative thoughts come intomind, they should quickly rephrase them with positive ones. They should not let thoughts such as "I am fallingbehind" or "Things arent going well" persist and reduce their motivation. Intentional, positive self-talk such as"I worked hard today," or "I am going in the right direction" can be very powerful.Under stress, many people with a high need for acceptance become negative, indecisive, and/or moody.Some experience self-doubt, pessimism, and anxiety. Some snack too much.People with a high need for acceptance tend to be at their best when they keep their attention focused oneffort, not on outcomes such as success or failure. They should concentrate mindfully on what they are doingat the moment, and not on how they did last week or how far they still need to go. They should avoidcomparing themselves to others. Comparisons do not help them, and might de-motivate them.People with a high need for acceptance may respond best to supervisors who provide regular encouragementand positive feedback ("Great job," "Keep it up") and recognize their progress as they go along. They mayperform best for supervisors who do not yell or criticize them when they make mistakes, but instead standbehind and praise them when they do well. It is more effective to intentionally and proactively ask supervisorsor close friends to provide this support than it is to passively wait to see if it comes along on its own. Theseindividuals might respond best to work groups that are positive and supportive. Some of these individualsstop listening when another person is yelling at or criticizing them.Some people with a high need for acceptance might do well in jobs or careers with infrequent evaluationssuch as church worker, civil servant, some public school positions, small business owner, gardener, truckdriver, and any corporate position where there is a friendly, supportive, or non-judgmental supervisor. Theymay dislike working in a job that requires self-confidence or exposure to frequent criticism -- such as sales,politics, research scientist, or actor -- or working for any supervisor who is judgmental and quick to criticizeothers.Reiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 7
  9. 9. Curiosity (2)Strong Desire, score of +.80 or higher ( +0.83)Since you scored high for intellectual curiosity on the Reiss Motivation Profile®, you may need to understandthings. Everybody likes to understand things, of course, but people with a high need for curiosity place anuncommonly high value on the intellectual aspects of life.The following is a general description of how a high need for curiosity might motivate you and might play outin your career or work. Typically people with this need show only some of these behaviors. You should pickand choose which ones apply to you.A high need for curiosity motivates intellectual behavior. Some people with this need are contemplative,inquisitive, thoughtful, and/or analytical. They may like to think deeply. Some are absent-minded and have atendency to become so absorbed in their thoughts that they pay little attention to what is going on aroundthem. No matter what they are doing -- flipping burgers, recovering in a hospital, listening to a speech --sooner or later they start analyzing something. When they are not thinking about something, they maybecome bored quickly.A high need for curiosity motivates people to care about ideas, knowledge, and theories, regardless ofpractical relevance. Some curious people become intellectuals. Some like to read books. Some seek outstimulating company and enjoy lively conversations. Many respect people who are smart and thoughtful.At work curious people are at their best when they understand what they are doing. They may dislike havingto follow unexplained instructions from their superiors.A high need for intellectual curiosity motivates some people to make things more complicated than they needbe. Some intellectuals, for example, may talk or write in long, complex sentences. Curious people have atendency to make things complicated because they like to deal with nuance. Some need to be careful not totalk over peoples heads.When under stress, some curious people have a tendency to become talkative or ask too many questions.Some may become overly analytical.Practical and intellectuals tend to misunderstand each other. Many practical people wonder if intellectuals aremired in trivia and should devote less time to analyzing things. Many intellectuals think that practical peopleneed to think more carefully about what they are doing. The truth of the matter is that we are individuals to amuch greater extent than is commonly appreciated. Some of us are born to become practical people, andothers are born to become intellectuals. Since each person is happiest with a lifestyle that fulfills his/her ownnature, he/she will resist external pressures to change.Some curious people might be interested in a career or job that is intellectually stimulating. They have manysuch jobs they can choose from including astronaut, business executive, detective, editor, engineer, investor,journalist, lawyer, librarian, nurse, scientist, and teacher. On the other hand, they might be disinterested in acareer or job that requires minimal intellectual effort such as animal caregiver, assembler, barber, carpenter,data entry person, factory work, hair stylist, garment worker (sewing), painter, repair person, truck driver,Reiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 8
  10. 10. typist, and waiter.Reiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 9
  11. 11. Expedient (3)Weak Desire, score of -.80 or lower ( -1.06)Since you scored low for expedience on the Reiss Motivation Profile®, you may have a high need for honor.You may be tuned into the moral aspects of life.The following is a general description of how the need for honor might motivate you and might play out in yourcareer or work. Typically people with this need show only some of these behaviors. You should pick andchoose which ones apply to you.Many people with this need value personal character. They typically accept responsibility for their actions,readily admit their mistakes, and avoid making excuses or blaming others. They tend to be honest,conscientious, trustworthy, and loyal. They follow the rules.Many of these individuals behave morally and keep promises. Many do not cheat, not even when they areunlikely to be caught. Many do not take property that does not belong to them. Many hold firm in their ethicalprinciples. Many care about how the game is played, not just about winning and losing. Many have a strongsense of duty and are willing to do what needs to be done, when it needs to be done.Many of these individuals resist temptations to act out of self-interest. Many do what is right, not what is intheir best personal interests.Some people with a high need for honor are self-disciplined. Some pride themselves in their self-control oftheir eating habits. Some pride themselves in their self-control of their sex drive.When under stress, some conscientious people have a tendency to feel guilty. Some become righteous andjudgmental.Some people with a high need for honor are loyal to their parents and ethnic group. Some are proud of theirheritage. Some are patriotic. Some value the traditions of their clan, ethnic group, or nation. Some are mindfulof the sacrifices of their parents and those who came before them.Conscientious people and expedient people tend to misunderstand each other. Many conscientious peoplethink that expedient people are self-serving. Many expedient people think that conscientious people are afraidof being caught and punished for bending rules. The truth of the matter is that individuality is much greaterthan commonly supposed. Some people are born to be conscientious, and others are born to be expedient.Since each person is happiest with a lifestyle that fulfills his/her own nature, he/she will resist externalpressures to change.Conscientious people might be interested in a career or job that give emphasis to integrity, character, orloyalty. Possible examples include clergy, judge, scientist, teacher, and umpire. On the other hand, they mightbe uncomfortable with any career or job in which they would be expected to cut corners or produce a shoddyproduct for profit.Reiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 10
  12. 12. Interdependence (4)Weak Desire, score of -.80 or lower ( -1.98)Since you scored low for interdependence on the Reiss Motivation Profile®, you may value yourindependence and personal freedom more than most people do. Everybody enjoys personal freedom, ofcourse, but people with a low need for interdependence may enjoy it to an above-average degree.The following is a general description of how a low need for interdependence might motivate you and mightplay out in your career or work. Typically people with this need show only some of these behaviors. Youshould pick and choose which ones apply to you.Many people with this need are self-reliant. Some want to be their own person. Some like to make their owndecisions and do things their way. Some dislike having to rely on others for money.Some people with this need like to assert their individuality. Some develop their own style or ways of doingthings. Some dress differently, wear their hair differently, or have unusual interests. Some are unimpressedwith conventional thinking or approaches.Since independent people dislike owing favors. Some are reluctant to curry favor with high status individualswho might be in positions to help them out. Some are slow to ask a friend for a loan. Some dislike askingneighbors to loan them a lawn mower or a car.Some independent people like to assert their individuality. Making choices (self-determination) about how todo a task may boost motivation.Some independent people dislike sharing their private thoughts and feelings with others. Some think theycompromise their independence when they become emotionally dependent on another person. Some arereluctant to praise others or even say "thank you." Some dislike "touchy feely" experiences. Some dislikealtered states of consciousness such as the "zone" or "flow."When under stress, some independent people may be reluctant to go along, to get along. They may stick totheir guns, especially on anything they view to be a matter of personal choice. Many are reluctant tocompromise. Especially when under stress, some independent people can become stubborn and unyielding.At work, independent people may be at their best with supervisors who respect their individuality. Someprefer supervisors who are businesslike and let them decide how to do things. Some do not want theirsupervisors to provide assistance when they feel they can do a task themselves. Some respond to supportbut not to high levels of support. Some become frustrated with activities in which the group (rather than theindividual) makes decisions and in which members are expected to support each other rather than takeindividual responsibility.Independent people and interdependent people tend to misunderstand each other. Many independent peoplethink that interdependent people would be happier if they were less reliant on others. Many interdependentpeople think independent people are stubborn and difficult to get along with and would be happier if theywould just go along, to get along. The truth of the matter is that individuality is much greater than commonlyReiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 11
  13. 13. supposed. Some people are born to be independent, and others are born to be interdependent. Since eachperson is happiest with a lifestyle that fulfills his/her own nature, he/she will resist external pressures tochange.Independent people might be interested in a career or job that provides a high degree of freedom anddecision making. Possible examples include book author, commodities trader, entrepreneur, investor, smallbusiness owner, and wall street trader. On the other hand, they might dislike a career or job that requires ahigh degree of teamwork or emotional sensitivity. Possible examples include clergy, counselor, middlemanagement, personal attendant, and salesperson.Reiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 12
  14. 14. Order (5)Weak Desire, score of -.80 or lower ( -2.00)Since you scored low for order on the Reiss Motivation Profile®, you may feel uncomfortable when yourenvironment is highly organized or scheduled.The following is a general description of how a low need for order might motivate you and might play out inyour career or work. Typically people with this need show only some of these behaviors. You should pick andchoose which ones apply to you.Many people with a low need for order dislike organizing, planning, and scheduling. Some dislike having toconform their behavior to detailed rules, schedules, and plans. Some value flexibility. Some are motivated byspontaneity. Some enjoy improvising and making it up as they go along. Some have a tendency to jump intonew projects with minimal planning.Many flexible people like to keep their options open for as long as they can. They may put off making decisionuntil the last minute. Some give little thought to where they are headed in life. As the saying goes, they "followtheir nose."Some flexible people have a tendency to have too many balls in the air. Some think it is impressive to beengaged in multiple activities at the same time. They may have a tendency to spread themselves too thin.Some tend to start a new project before they finished the last one.Many people with a low need for order prefer to focus on the essence of a matter, paying little attention todetails. Some consider small details as trifles. Some often do not notice details. They may like to follow thespirit of the law, but not necessarily the letter of the law. Some focus on the "big picture."Many flexible people are at their best in situations requiring improvisation and spontaneity. Some dislikeactivities requiring precision and repetition, such as filling out forms or golf swings. Many value is variation inroutine. They may like to vary how they perform routines from one time to the next.When under stress, some of these individuals are quick to make changes and try adaptations. Some changeplans so often they do not give any one plan a sufficient opportunity to work. They must guard against makingchanges for the sake of change.Orderly people and flexible people tend to misunderstand each other. Many orderly people think flexiblepeople tend to have too many balls in the air and would be more successful if they prioritized better andorganized what they had to do. Many flexible people think orderly people are mired in trivia and would bemore successful if they spent more time on what is important. The truth of the matter is that individuality ismuch greater than commonly supposed. Some people are born to be orderly, while others are born to beflexible and spontaneous. Since each person is happiest with a lifestyle that fulfills his/her own nature, he/shewill resist external pressures to change.Flexible people might be interested in a job or career that that rewards spontaneity and/or capacity to copewith ambiguity. Possible examples include advertising, air traffic controller, consultant, creative writer,Reiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 13
  15. 15. gambler, ombudsmen, and wall street trader. On the other hand, they might be poorly suited for a job orcareer that rewards attention to details, procedure, organization, repetition, or cleanliness. Possible examplesinclude accountant, cleaner, editor, housekeeper, lawyer, negotiator, nurse, office manager, physician, andwaiter.Reiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 14
  16. 16. Physical Exercise (6)Weak Desire, score of -.80 or lower ( -1.05)Since you scored low for physical activity on the Reiss Motivation Profile®, you may dislike vigorous muscleexercise, physical exertion, or motion. Everybody likes to exercise to some extent, of course, but people witha low need for physical activity enjoy it much less than does the average person.The following is a general description of how a low need for physical exercise might motivate you and mightplay out in your career or work. Typically people with this need show only some of these behaviors. Youshould pick and choose which ones apply to you.Especially in middle age many people with a low need for physical activity fall into a sedentary lifestyle.Instead of walking to a store a short distance away, for example, they may take a car. At home they mayenjoy watching television or spending time on their computer. Some become true couch potatoes.Wellness can be a challenge for some people with a low need for physical activity. Lack of exercise is asignificant long-term cause of obesity, and it can lead to sleep problems and negative mood. Exercise iscritical to counter the long-term negative physiological affects of stress.From a wellness perspective, it is important that these individuals find a way to engage in regular physicalexercise despite their lack of natural drive to do so. They may need to make a conscious decision to providetheir bodies with a healthy amount of physical activity. In order to make this decision, some need to fullyunderstand all of the positive effects of physical activity as well as the negative consequences of not beingactive. Their motivation needs to come from a desire for a good quality of life – what they are able to do, howlong they live, what their health will be like as they age, how they feel – depends somewhat on maintaining afit body.Even when these individuals make a commitment to health and fitness, it is unlikely that they will become"workout warriors," and this should not be their goal. They do not need to become runners or gym rats. Whatis important is that they find a way to consistently provide their body with physical activity. They are morelikely to stick with this if they find ways to be physically active that also meet their other needs. If they are ahighly social person, for example, being part of a regular walking group can be enjoyable and rewarding.Some people might build physical activity into their regular lifestyle in a variety of ways. This may involvecombinations of things such as playing more actively with their children, gardening, golfing (walking asopposed to using a cart), mowing the lawn with a push mower instead of a riding mower, taking a dog for awalk, shoveling snow instead of snow blowing, taking stairs instead of elevators, walking or biking instead ofdriving to any place that is within a few blocks, etc. For many, this more natural approach to building inphysical activity is more likely to be maintained than engaging in specific exercise programs.Because of their preference for sedentary activities, it can be helpful for people who are relatively inactive tomonitor and purposely limit the amount of engagement in certain activities. For example, watching televisionis the default activity for many less active people. If they do not have something they have to do, they simplyturn on the TV. From a wellness perspective, it would be more effective for these individuals to consciouslychoose the shows that they want to watch ahead of time, and to not turn on the TV other than at those times.Reiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 15
  17. 17. When under pressure, these individuals tend to conserve energy even more than usual. They may skip theirdaily walk or time in the gym; some may just mope around the house and be even more sedentary thanusual.Active people and inactive people tend to misunderstand each other. Many active people think inactivepeople are lazy and would be happier if they were in better shape. Many inactive people think active peopleoverdo it and would be better off not working out so much. The truth of the matter is that individuality is muchgreater than commonly supposed. Some people are born to be active, and others are born to be less active.Since each person is happiest with a lifestyle that fulfills his/her own nature, he/she will resist externalpressures to change.Inactive people might be interested in a job or career that involves little physical exertion. Possible examplesinclude announcer, book author, clerk, editor, computer programmer, investor, and web designer. On theother hand, they might be disinterested in a job or career that requires strength, stamina, fitness, or athleticskills. Possible examples include athlete, police work, fireman, military, mover, and waiter.Reiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 16
  18. 18. Social Contact (7)Strong Desire, score of +.80 or higher ( +0.99)Since you scored high for social contact on the Reiss Motivation Profile®, socializing with friends and peersmay be a high priority for you. The following is a general description of how a high need for social contactmight motivate you and might play out in your career or work. Typically people with this need show only someof these behaviors. You should pick and choose which ones apply to you.Many individuals with a strong need for social contact are friendly, outgoing, and gregarious. As the sayinggoes, "in order to have friends, you must first be one." Some take an interest in others and keep up with themas years pass.Many people with this need seek an active social life. They are tuned in to the local social scene. They like toknow what is happening. Some like to be included and may be hurt when they are excluded. Many areenergized in social situation.Some of these individuals are team players. Some like to do things in groups. Some embrace the philosophy,"One for all, and all for one." Some like to belong to clubs and organizations. Some are attracted to teamsports because of the opportunities to make lifelong friends and to socialize. Some enjoy the camaraderieand the stories teammates tell about each other.Many sociable people are fun loving. Some come alive at parties. Some like to horse around. Someappreciate pranks.When under pressure, many sociable people seek the company of others, especially people they are close to.Some use jokes or pranks as a means of releasing some steam.Sociable and private people tend to misunderstand each other. Many sociable people think that privatepeople are too serious about things and would be happier with a richer social life. Many private people thinkthat sociable people are superficial and should be more serious about things. The truth of the matter is thatthese people have different natures. Some people are born to be gregarious, and others are born to beprivate. Since each person is happiest with a lifestyle that fulfills his/her own nature, he/she will resist externalpressures to change.Sociable people might be interested in a job or career that rewards social skills and interest in other people.Possible examples include civil servant, counselor, flight attendant, interviewer, marketer, party planner,public relations, recreation chief, recruiter, and salesperson. They might dislike a job or career that involvessignificant time alone. Possible examples include book author, night watchman, painter, security guard, truckdriver, or any job in a remote, isolated place such as a researcher in Antarctica.Reiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 17
  19. 19. Status (8)Weak Desire, score of -.80 or lower ( -0.89)Since you scored low for status on the Reiss Motivation Profile®, you may be relatively unimpressed with theprestige value of the things you own. The following is a general description of how a low need for status mightmotivate you and might play out in your career or work. Typically people with this need show only some ofthese behaviors. You should pick and choose which ones apply to you.Many people with this need are humble. Many are down-to- earth individuals who do not put on airs. Someare egalitarians. Many dislike elitism, pomposity, and snobbery because these qualities challenge their beliefin social equality. Some are informal, unceremonious, or casual.A low need for status motivates some people to imitate the mannerisms of ordinary people, especially middleclass people. Some act, for example, in a informal manner. Some wear jeans, baseball caps, and otherclothes associated with average people. Some avoid the "in crowd."Some people with a low need for status reject materialism. Many buy and use products based on how wellthey are made or work, not based on how prestigious they are. Few are interested in luxury cars. Some tendnot to notice prestigious cars, addresses, or clothing labels.Some people with this need pay little attention to what others think. Some do not keep up appearances.Some do not care what the others think of them.Some people with a low need identify with the middle or working class. Some do respect wealthy people justbecause they are rich and have money. Some think celebrities are undeserving of all the attention theyreceive. Many are unimpressed with royalty.At work, some people with this need are slow to learn the "pecking order." Some are slow to understandsocial hierarchies such as organizations or bureaucracies. Some do not show the appropriate amount ofdeference and respect to people of higher status than they are. Some pay little attention to the prestige valueof their job title, job, or the company they work for.When under stress, some of these individuals thumb their nose at propriety. Some like to see elitists andfavorites get a comeuppance. Many may be more motivated in the role of underdog than favorite.Formal and informal people tend to misunderstand each other. Many formal people think that informal peopleare unimportant and can be ignored. Many informal people think that formal people have a tendency to put onairs. The truth of the matter is that these people have different natures. Some people are born to be formal,and others are born to be informal. Since each person is happiest with a lifestyle that fulfills his/her ownnature, he/she will resist external pressures to change.People with a low need for status might be interested in a job or career that is associated with the workingclass. Possible examples include assembler, builder, claims adjuster, data entry technician, department storesales, factory worker, funeral director, mechanic, nanny, painter, repairman, and taxi cab driver. They mightdislike any job that involves interacting with wealthy or formal people. Possible examples include diplomat,Reiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 18
  20. 20. investment banker, salesperson of luxury goods, and protocol officer.Reiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 19
  21. 21. Interesting Information about the Reiss Motivation Profile®• Many people use the acronym RMP to refer to this tool.• Everybody embraces all 16 basic desires but people prioritize them differently. How you prioritize the 16 basic desires is called your Reiss Profile®• The results of your RMP reveal your strivings. It shows the motives likely to drive your actions for the rest of your life.• The results of your RMP reveal your core values. You value what you desire, and you desire what you value.• The results of your RMP reveal your personality. Your traits are just habits for pursuing and managing your desires.• The results of your RMP reveal your relationship outcomes. Comparison of the results of the RMPs of any two people suggests what attracts each to the other and what they are likely to disagree on or quarrel over repeatedly.Reiss Motivation Profile: (0004) Jane+Sample Page 20
  22. 22. Additional learning options:1. Listen to any recorded SLS Global Assess webinar 24/7.2. Participate in another Reiss Motivation Profile Webinar (see schedule at www.slsglobalassess.com).3. Purchase any of the “Related Products to Enhance Your Learning” – books and additional assessments.4. Purchase one-on-one or group interpretation with one of our experienced and trained consultants.
  23. 23. On behalf of everyone at SLS Global Assess …we wish you happy learning! And remember, Knowledge is Power! CONTACT INFORMATION: SLS Global Assess www.slsglobalassess.com Email: support@slsglobalassess.com

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