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Recruitment

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Recruitment

  1. 1. HUMAN RESOURCES RECRUITMENT PRESENTED BY: SALONI AGARWAL
  2. 2. NEED OF RECRUITMENT
  3. 3. • Someone is leaving the organisation and needs to be replaced You need to make sure you do an exit interview to find out why they are leaving. It might be because they need a new challenge, in which case the insight might help you with other employees. Or it may be that they didn’t feel the job had enough work, in which case you might not need to replace them exactly but instead need to create a new role with other responsibilities too, or can turn the role into a part-time one. Or is there another member of staff also without enough work who can take on the responsibilities of this role as well? • A new project might need a specific skill set but does it need a new member of staff, or can existing members be trained? If a new member of staff is brought in, is this permanent or could it be a short-term contract? Are you certain no-one else in the organisation can currently do the role? Many people may be willing for an opportunity to showcase their skills.
  4. 4. • When a colleague is promoted this is a good opportunity to continue promoting internally if you can Is there someone who can step up to the new role and learn more while doing it? If not then you should look at succession planning for the future too, making sure that when someone else moves up, there are people able to take the position. • A member of staff moving to another department is also an opportunity For example, you may not need to advertise externally if there is another member of the organisation internally who would like to move teams.
  5. 5. Recruitment life-cycle I. Recruitment need analysis II. Job advert created III. Internal candidates considered IV. External ad placement decided V. Reviewing of applicants (CV reviewing for example) VI. Invitation to interview VII. Interview VIII. Review of interviews IX. Invitation to second interview X. Feedback to applicants XI. Second interview XII. Job offer XIII. Unsuccessful applicants XIV. Acceptance of offer XV. Setting up of first day XVI. Check-in at end of probation period
  6. 6. Writing a job description • When you’re looking for the best candidates to join your organisation it is important that the job description created for the position is accurate and gives a good description of the role and the activities it involves. • Often HR will rely on the manager of a team to give them the information for the job description, or may ask the manager to write it themselves in the first case, or perhaps the manager may ask HR for help, but HR should always check that the description complies with local employment law legislation and is thorough enough to help an applicant decide whether they would like to apply.
  7. 7. Top tips for writing a job description • Keep it simple and avoid being too prescriptive as this might put some applicants off. • Seek input from your HR colleagues or other managers and stakeholders in your company. • Make sure the job description is clear about accountabilities for the role. • Be clear on the skills you need. • Think about how other similar roles are positioned within the company.
  8. 8. Recruiting fairly – avoiding bias • When recruiting to fill a particular position it can be too easy to have in your mind a picture of the kind person you think would be best. • This is one way in which bias can occur during the recruitment process, where a manager may find they are looking for someone to fit their idea of who the ideal candidate is, rather than taking each candidate on their own merits. • This can also lead to a lack of diversity in a workplace, where candidates are not recruited due to not being thought of as “fitting” with the organisation, rather than their ability to successfully do the role. This practice is not only an unfair recruitment process for candidates and in some cases could be illegal, but it also creates damaging situations for organisations. • For example, an organisation lacking in age, gender or ethnic diversity is unlikely to reflect or fully understand its customers. Similarly, there is likely to be a lack of different viewpoints in decision making and innovation if the majority of employees come from similar backgrounds with similar life experiences and are likely to agree with each other. Sometimes this bias is conscious, where the people responsible for hiring look for a specific candidate profile, or are in some other way deliberately exclusive. However, these biases need not always be conscious in order to have an effect on the way in which we recruit people.
  9. 9. Examples • Affinity bias: This can lead people to prefer someone who is just like themselves or someone that they know. This is because they immediately feel comfortable with that person, and may rate them as better by making assumptions about their ability and performance just because of some other characteristics they have. • Endowment effect: This is where someone hiring may value the skills of existing staff so highly they undervalue the skills someone can bring to an organisation that may be different. For example, if you are hiring a computer coder and have a team very good at coding one specific language, you may overlook a candidate who has many other skills of benefit to your organisation but who is weaker in that specific skill, even though it may be less critical and can be developed. • Confirmation bias: This is when someone thinks something about a candidate then looks for information to confirm what they think rather than looking at everything objectively. • Halo effect: This occurs when a recruiter allows one piece of information to affect how they judge everything else they hear about a person. For example, they may hear that a candidate has one skill they really need, and this then means they overlook other aspects of their skills, work experience or attitude which might otherwise rule them out.
  10. 10. Structuring interviews to avoid bias • The way an interview is structured can go some way to avoiding bias and to helping ensure that the recruitment process is fair. A structured interview also makes the process more likely to help predict the future performance of a candidate. • It is important throughout to remember that the purpose of the interview isn’t to catch the candidate out or see if they will fail, but to give them the best opportunity possible to demonstrate why they are right for the role, so an informed, fair and balanced decision can be made.
  11. 11. Ways in which this can be achieved include HR helping the hiring team • Ensure the interview is structured - Prepare a list of questions in advance and follow the same format for each person you interview. This means every candidate is asked the same questions, can be scored on the same areas and has the same opportunity to demonstrate their ability • Make sure questions are relevant, and that there’s the right mix of questions related to the job, to their experience, to how they might approach challenges in this particular role, and which allow the candidate to describe situations where they have applied the skills or behaviours needed in the past • Focus on gathering information - The interview is not a decision making process, but gives the information needed to make the decision
  12. 12. Writing a Job Advert How to write an effective and fair job advert: Avoiding discrimination • When looking for new people to join an organisation HR have a responsibility to ensure the hiring avoids discriminating against all employees and potential job applicants. • Aside from the fact that discriminating is the wrong thing to do and is bad for people, organisations and societies, each country will have its own laws governing how employers must avoid such discrimination, including what can and cannot be put into a job description or a person specification.
  13. 13. Top tips for advertising a role • Overselling or underselling: Avoid adverts promoting the best parts of the role too heavily or alternatively focusing too much on the detail. The candidate needs to get a clear picture of the role and misinformation during recruitment can lead to dissatisfaction if the job turns out to be different from expected. • Vague terminology: The easier it is to understand the job, the more likely you are to receive suitable applications. Make sure your description of duties is clear and avoid terms such as ‘hard working’ or ‘lively’ as these can be interpreted differently. • Qualifications: Ensure that the qualifications asked for are relevant and at an appropriate level for the job. • Acronyms and jargon: Acronyms and technical terminology can be confusing and can exclude candidates from outside the organisation or sector. Avoid using them or make sure you explain what they mean. • Immeasurable criteria: A manager needs to be able to judge whether criteria have been met, so they need to be measurable. For example ‘a good sense of humour’ could seem fine but how will you measure it? What’s funny to one person may not be to another.
  14. 14. Retention • There are several different reasons why people may leave an organisation, for example, they may have found employment elsewhere, they may be retiring, or stopping work for another reason, or, it might be that they are being asked to leave when they do not wish to do so, such as dismissal or redundancy. • Organisations will need to be aware of turnover rates – that is, how many people leave their organisation and how frequently – and how these affect the organisation’s performance and ability to achieve its goals, in addition to the cost of recruitment and retention work. • If the organisation is large, identifying areas with high turnover can help influence recruitment strategy, and also highlight other challenges which need to be addressed through tools such as confidential exit surveys.
  15. 15. Elements to be considered as part of a retention strategy • Job previews – This is about giving realistic expectations to people joining and not overselling and minimising parts of the job, just the same as when writing a job description. • Career development and progression – Create opportunities for employees to develop skills and move on in their careers. Understand their expectations too, and if promotion isn’t possible are there sideways moves or new skills they can develop to keep their work interesting? • Consult employees – Ensure that employees have a ‘voice’ through consultative bodies, regular appraisals, attitude surveys and grievance systems. • Be flexible – Wherever possible, allow flexibility on working hours and times. It’s also important to monitor workload and ensure it is manageable within working hours • Avoid a culture of ‘presenteeism’ – Where people feel obliged to work longer hours than are necessary to impress management. • Treat people fairly – a perception of unfairness, whatever the management view of the issue, is a major cause of voluntary resignations.

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