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  1. 1. H.R.D.-MENTORING AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
  2. 2. Contents:  MENTORING • MEANING • BENEFITS OF MENTORING • TYPES OF MENTORS  PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT • MEANING • SYSTEM • PROCESS
  3. 3. Mentoring:  Mentoring is a powerful personal development and empowerment tool which supports and encourage people to manage their own learning in order that they may maximise their potential, develop their skills, improve their performance and become the person they want to be.  Mentoring is a partnership between two people (mentor and mentee) normally working in a similar field or sharing similar experiences. It is a helpful relationship based upon mutual trust and respect.  Mentor set's brand of mentoring is person focused. It is less of a formalized professional relationship and more of a partnership; more like a friendship.  Mentoring is a formal or informal relationship established between an experienced, knowledgeable employee and an inexperienced or new employee.  A mentor is a guide who can help the mentee to find the right direction and who can help them to develop solutions to career issues.  A mentor should help the mentee to believe in his or herself and boost their confidence. A mentor should ask questions and challenge, while providing guidance and encouragement. Mentoring allows the mentee to explore new ideas in confidence.
  4. 4. Benefits of Mentoring:  The employee feels supported and has a mechanism for working through any problems that exist as a result of being in a minority.  Women often – but not always – feel more comfortable being mentored by another woman.  Mentoring includes training, support, encouragement, advice and guidance from people who have both 'done it before' and are usually independent of the mentee’s current organisation.  Both the mentees and mentors gain confidence and leadership skills.  Mentees report the benefits of a different perspective.  Mentees are more likely to plan and apply for promotions.  Mentors and mentees can gain insights into best business practices in other companies.  The process allows mentors and mentees to make useful networking connections, and have access to role models.
  5. 5. Types of mentors: 4C’s 1. COACH 2. CONNECTORS 3. CHEERLEADERS 4. CHALLENGER
  6. 6. 1. The Coach : Parents will be your first coaches. If they're good, they'll encourage you when you're down, listen, and help you figure out solutions to incoming problems. They can coach you through tough moments, think big picture on projects and ideas, and help you solve work-related problems. Their satisfaction is knowing they are paying it forward by helping someone younger who has potential. 2. The Connector : These are some of the most important mentors to have and they are pretty rare. Most people are very inward looking. Connectors are outward-facing people whose very satisfaction comes from helping people meet each other.
  7. 7. 3. The Cheerleader : These are the people whom you can call after getting a big promotion and they will be as thrilled for you as your mother. In a sometimes cutthroat world, you need people who will genuinely be happy for you and who will be there when everyone else has left--i.e., after your company has gone bankrupt. 4. The Challenger : If you want to grow, you will want some challengers in your life who will tell you when they think you're doing something wrong or if an idea just plain sucks. They're the ones who, after you call the Cheerleader about your great idea, will tell you a dozen ways why it won't work unless you do X, Y, and Z. This criticism, if it comes from the right place, will set you on the right path. Challengers are super smart and super fast--they often don't have a lot of time so you'll find they'll give their dose of advice quickly and move on. Call upon them only when you need it.
  8. 8. Performance management:  According to Armstrong and Baron (1998), Performance Management is both a strategic and an integrated approach to delivering successful results in organizations by improving the performance and developing the capabilities of teams and individuals.  The term performance management gained its popularity in early 1980’s when total quality management programs received utmost importance for achievement of superior standards and quality performance. Tools such as job design, leadership development, training and reward system received an equal impetus along with the traditional performance appraisal process in the new comprehensive and a much wider framework. Performance management is an on-going communication process which is carried between the supervisors and the employees through out the year. The process is very much cyclical and continuous in nature.  Performance management is a much broader and a complicated function of HR, as it encompasses activities such as joint goal setting, continuous progress review and frequent communication, feedback and coaching for improved performance, implementation of employee development programmes and rewarding achievements.  The process of performance management starts with the joining of a new incumbent in a system and ends when an employee quits the organization.
  9. 9. P.M. System:  A performance management system includes the following actions…  Developing clear job descriptions and employee performance plans which includes the key result areas (KRA') and performance indicators.  Selection of right set of people by implementing an appropriate selection process.  Negotiating requirements and performance standards for measuring the outcome and overall productivity against the predefined benchmarks.  Providing continuous coaching and feedback during the period of delivery of performance.  Identifying the training and development needs by measuring the outcomes achieved against the set standards and implementing effective development programs for improvement.  Holding quarterly performance development discussions and evaluating employee performance on the basis of performance plans.  Designing effective compensation and reward systems for recognizing those employees who excel in their jobs by achieving the set standards in accordance with the performance plans or rather exceed the performance benchmarks.  Providing promotional/career development support and guidance to the employees.  Performing exit interviews for understanding the cause of employee discontentment and thereafter exit from an organization.
  10. 10. P.M. process:  A performance management process sets the platform for rewarding excellence by aligning individual employee accomplishments with the organization’s mission and objectives and making the employee and the organization understand the importance of a specific job in realizing outcomes. By establishing clear performance expectations which includes results, actions and behaviours, it helps the employees in understanding what exactly is expected out of their jobs and setting of standards help in eliminating those jobs which are of no use any longer. Through regular feedback and coaching, it provides an advantage of diagnosing the problems at an early stage and taking corrective actions.  To conclude, performance management can be regarded as a proactive system of managing employee performance for driving the individuals and the organizations towards desired performance and results. It’s about striking a harmonious alignment between individual and organizational objectives for accomplishment of excellence in performance.
  11. 11. Thank you

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