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Eyetrack:Photojournalism
What makes 

a photo worth
publishing?
S A R A Q U I N N M E D I A @saraquinn
!
Research for the ...
“What can you tell me 

about photojournalism 

from Poynter’s 

eyetrack research?”
Documentary photos 

get more attention than
static or posed photos.
!
Faces attract a lot
of attention—often 

the first ...
What makes 

a photo worth
publishing?
Eyetrack:Photojournalism
What makes 

a photo worth
publishing?
Eyetrack:Photojournalism
Exploratory
research to start
conversation
about news
photography.
Howdiscerningare

peoplewholookat

journalisticphotos?
Whatdotheyvalue?
Whatdotheyvalue?
Whatdotheyremember?
Dotheytrust
whattheysee?
Whatmakesthemwant
toshareanimage?
Doesqualitymatter?
Whatis“quality?”
Weaskedthem.
Wewatchedthem.
Andweanalyzed

thewaytheylooked

at200photographs.
Fifty-twopeopletookpartinourstudy

inMay2014,attheUniversityofMinnesota.
!
!
!
THE STUDY
Female Male50% 50%
“Digital Natives” “Printnets”
!
18-30 years old 45-60 years old51% 49%
Wetestedtwo,distinctagegroups.
!
!
!
Born into a 

...
Peopletookpartinfiveelementsoftesting

duringanhourlongsessionwithselected
photographs.
!
!
!
THE STUDY
100 photos contributed by

the public (user generated content)
100 photos taken by 

professional photojournalists
+
200 p...
THE STUDY
All images had been published by news organizations.
200 photos
shown randomly
between pro 

and UGC
We recorded eye movements to see

what subjects looked at, at any given time.
We recorded eye movements to see

what subjects looked at, at any given time.
1. Eyetracking
An invisible, infrared camera captures 

the gaze of the eyes.
Our eye tracking gear created a video that

revealed the gaze of the eye.
THE STUDY
We asked subjects to rate the quality of each image.
2. Quality rating
THE STUDY
We asked subjects to rate the quality of each image.
And the likelihood that they might share it.
3. Probability...
“Was this photograph taken by a 

professional photojournalist, or not?”
4. Presumption of source
5. Exit Interviews
Captions appeared as originally published, 

including the photographer’s name, though 

we excluded the publication name.
PhotojournalistsamonghardesthitbyU.S.jobcuts
2000 2005 2010 2012
Reporters,
writers
!
!
!
!
!
Copy editors,
layout editors...
PhotojournalistsamonghardesthitbyU.S.jobcuts
2000 2005 2010 2012
Reporters,
writers
!
!
!
!
!
Copy editors,
layout editors...
Major

findings
100 photos contributed by

the public (user generated content)
100 photos taken by 

professional photojournalists
+
200 p...
People spent 50 percent longer with 

the professional photographs in the study
FINDINGS
User-submitted

news photographs
...
People were able to identify a professionally 

taken photo 90 percent of the time.
!
!
!
FINDINGS
Average time spent looking at professional
photographs in the study:
FINDINGS
Faces 36%
33% Captions
Average time spent looking at professional
photographs in the study:
FINDINGS
14% Bodies
Faces 36%
33% Captions
10% Detail...
FINDINGS
Each of the highest rated photographs in the study 

was taken by a professional photojournalist.
FINDINGS
Of the 25 highest rated photos:
!
!
!
!
!
!
Women, particularly older women, were 

most likely to give a photo t...
FINDINGS
Professional photos in the study were

twice as likely to be shared.
What were people likely to share?
FINDINGS
Social media, e-mail or, 

“Hey, you have to see this!”
FINDINGS
… Emotional, relatable photographs.
FINDINGS
This dog, “Otto,” was the only UGC photograph 

to make the list of most shareable photos.
.
OBSERVATIONS:
People were drawn to faces, first,
even in a complex image.
People were drawn to faces first,
even in a comp...
OBSERVATIONS:
People were drawn to faces, first,
even in a complex image.
OBSERVATIONS:
People were drawn first, to faces.
OBSERVATIONS:
People were drawn first, to faces.
OBSERVATIONS:
People were drawn first, to faces.
FINDINGS
EarlierPoyntereyetrackfindings…inlieu

ofadominantelement,facesdrewattention.
FINDINGS
EarlierPoyntereyetrackfindings…inlieu

ofadominantelement,facesdrewattention.
FINDINGS
EarlierPoyntereyetrackfindings…inlieu

ofadominantelement,facesdrewattention.
FINDINGS
EarlierPoyntereyetrackfindings…inlieu

ofadominantelement,facesdrewattention.
FINDINGS
EarlierPoyntereyetrackfindings…inlieu

ofadominantelement,facesdrewattention.
FINDINGS
Test subjects showed great interest in

interactions between people in a photo.
They were also interested in the 

interaction between people in the frame.
FINDINGS
“Emotional” content was often cited 
...
FINDINGS
Captions were well read in the study.
FINDINGS
The longer or better-developed a caption, 

the more likely the photo itself received attention.
OBSERVATIONS:
People look back and forth between caption 

and image, establishing context.
FINDINGS
Captions in our survey of user-generated 

photographs tended to be poorly-developed.
Mostmemorable?
FINDINGS
Each photo cited as “most memorable”
was a professional image.
MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS:
“My gosh, this told a story. And, it immediately drew me in.”
MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS:
“The one of the two ladies leaving the dance floor. 

You could tell that they were happy. The...
MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS:
“The two guys hugging. It captured emotion. It was being in 

the right place and capturing th...
MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS:
“A girl being happy and young and carefree over this very, 

very somber place. It was just a ...
MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS:
“The little girl—there’s obviously the contrast between life and death. 

It was a natural pho...
MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS:
“I’m not a sports person, at all. But … it’s a high quality photo, catching
the moment—the guy...
MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS:
“A dramatic, human moment. Something that can tell the story on it’s own. 

Something I don’t ...
MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS:
“There was like a split second where she let go of the golf club — and it 

was crystal clear....
MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS:
“Rich and beautifully colored. Technical perfection. Clarity of focus.”
MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS:
“The guy with a flamingo wrapped around his head. 

It was such a fun, unexpected picture.”
MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS:
“The photographer would have had been laying on the ground! And,
this is what we’ve all been f...
MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS:
“It’s not that it’s rare, it’s that someone has decided to see it!”
What is
quality?
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
People weren’t shy when describing
what they didn’t like:
— nothing of interest in that photo to me,...
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
People weren’t shy when describing
what they didn’t like:
— nothing of interest in that photo to me,...
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
People weren’t shy when describing
what they didn’t like:
— nothing of interest in that photo to me,...
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
People weren’t shy when describing
what they didn’t like:
— nothing of interest in that photo to me,...
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
People weren’t shy when describing
what they didn’t like:
— nothing of interest in that photo to me,...
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
People weren’t shy when describing
what they didn’t like:
— nothing of interest in that photo to me,...
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
People weren’t shy when describing
what they didn’t like:
— nothing of interest in that photo to me,...
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
“Poor quality”
“TV stations that say, 

‘Hey, send us pictures 

from your backyard!’ ”
!
!
!
!
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
“A few grip-and-grins, 

and people holding up fish.”
!
!
!
!
!
“Poor quality”
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
Words to describe “less than quality” photos:
“A few grip-and-grins, 

and people holding up fish.”
...
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
“I can see them going in, to get the glasses for the 

eclipse … but, it would have been great to se...
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
“Just a bunch of people, standing in a line.”
Lowest quality ratings:
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
“I just don’t care! I don’t know who you are. I don’t know

what’s going on in the game. It doesn’t ...
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
“I looked and looked, but a photo of a dock where 

a boat floated away isn’t much of a photo.”
Lowe...
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
“The subject of this is barely in the picture.”
Lowest quality ratings:
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
“Quality” photos:
— tells me a story vs. just capturing a scene
!
— the right place at the right tim...
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
“Quality” photos:
— tells me a story vs. just capturing a scene
!
— the right place at the right tim...
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
“Quality” photos:
— tells me a story vs. just capturing a scene
!
— the right place at the right tim...
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
“Quality” photos:
— tells me a story vs. just capturing a scene
!
— the right place at the right tim...
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
“Quality” photos:
— tells me a story vs. just capturing a scene
!
— the right place at the right tim...
FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
“Quality” photos:
— tells me a story vs. just capturing a scene
!
— the right place at the right tim...
What makes 

a photo worth
publishing?
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS:
“(A photo where) someone’s
recognizing the detail in
something. If I feel like I’m...
Here’s why
this was worth
your time.
Peopleclearlyrecognizethequality

ofprofessionallygeneratedphotos.
HERE’S WHY THIS IS WORTH YOUR TIME
Themostmemorablephotosin

thisstudyweretakenbyprofessionals.
HERE’S WHY THIS IS WORTH YOUR TIME
Peopleequatequalityphotography
withcontext,emotionandstorytelling.
HERE’S WHY THIS IS WORTH YOUR TIME
Peopleshowinterestininteractions
betweenpeopleinaphoto.
HERE’S WHY THIS IS WORTH YOUR TIME
Moreattentionisdrawntophotos

ofrealpeople,doingthingsinrealtime
—ratherthanstaticorposedphotos.
HERE’S WHY THIS IS WORTH ...
Goodcaptionsmatterforcontext.
HERE’S WHY THIS IS WORTH YOUR TIME
Captionswithprofessionalimages

aregenerallymoredevelopedthan
UGCimages.
HERE’S WHY THIS IS WORTH YOUR TIME
Moretimeisspentwithphotographs
thathavestrongcontext:
!
a genuine moment
!
interaction/relationships
!
emotion
!
well-deve...
Some photos
are purely
informational.
Others show

us time, place,
moment and
story.
Questions?
@saraquinn
!
#eyetrackphoto
nppa.org
Questions?
@saraquinn @kmcbride
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn
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Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn

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Eyetracking Photojournalism is research for the National Press Photographers Association.

In an age where images are instantaneous and easily shared, what characteristics make a photograph worth publishing and sharing? We explore how people perceive the quality of photographs — from those taken by seasoned professionals to cellphone images that capture everyday life. The research combines eyetrack testing with extensive interviews asking people their thoughts on storytelling, quality and what makes images memorable. Among our findings: people value images that reflect their lives and give context to the world around them. As consumers navigate a glut of visual clutter, they are developing a new language on images. The implications inform journalists, brand advocates and community activists. Ultimately, the findings help us understand how social media impacts democracy.

Publié dans : Art & Photos
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Eyetracking Photojournalism Research by Sara Quinn

  1. Eyetrack:Photojournalism What makes 
 a photo worth publishing? S A R A Q U I N N M E D I A @saraquinn ! Research for the National Press Photographers Association
  2. “What can you tell me 
 about photojournalism 
 from Poynter’s 
 eyetrack research?”
  3. Documentary photos 
 get more attention than static or posed photos. ! Faces attract a lot of attention—often 
 the first thing looked 
 at, in a photograph. ! Mugshots get only 
 a fleeting glance— purely informational, unless there is strong, supporting information in the presentation. E A R L I E R P O Y N T E R S T U D I E S
  4. What makes 
 a photo worth publishing?
  5. Eyetrack:Photojournalism What makes 
 a photo worth publishing?
  6. Eyetrack:Photojournalism Exploratory research to start conversation about news photography.
  7. Howdiscerningare
 peoplewholookat
 journalisticphotos?
  8. Whatdotheyvalue?
  9. Whatdotheyvalue? Whatdotheyremember?
  10. Dotheytrust whattheysee?
  11. Whatmakesthemwant toshareanimage?
  12. Doesqualitymatter?
  13. Whatis“quality?”
  14. Weaskedthem.
  15. Wewatchedthem.
  16. Andweanalyzed
 thewaytheylooked
 at200photographs.
  17. Fifty-twopeopletookpartinourstudy
 inMay2014,attheUniversityofMinnesota. ! ! ! THE STUDY Female Male50% 50%
  18. “Digital Natives” “Printnets” ! 18-30 years old 45-60 years old51% 49% Wetestedtwo,distinctagegroups. ! ! ! Born into a 
 digital world. One foot in the print 
 world, one foot in digital. THE STUDY
  19. Peopletookpartinfiveelementsoftesting
 duringanhourlongsessionwithselected photographs. ! ! ! THE STUDY
  20. 100 photos contributed by
 the public (user generated content) 100 photos taken by 
 professional photojournalists + 200 photos shown randomly between pro 
 and UGC
  21. THE STUDY All images had been published by news organizations. 200 photos shown randomly between pro 
 and UGC
  22. We recorded eye movements to see
 what subjects looked at, at any given time.
  23. We recorded eye movements to see
 what subjects looked at, at any given time. 1. Eyetracking
  24. An invisible, infrared camera captures 
 the gaze of the eyes.
  25. Our eye tracking gear created a video that
 revealed the gaze of the eye.
  26. THE STUDY We asked subjects to rate the quality of each image. 2. Quality rating
  27. THE STUDY We asked subjects to rate the quality of each image. And the likelihood that they might share it. 3. Probability of sharing
  28. “Was this photograph taken by a 
 professional photojournalist, or not?” 4. Presumption of source
  29. 5. Exit Interviews
  30. Captions appeared as originally published, 
 including the photographer’s name, though 
 we excluded the publication name.
  31. PhotojournalistsamonghardesthitbyU.S.jobcuts 2000 2005 2010 2012 Reporters, writers ! ! ! ! ! Copy editors, layout editors, online producers ! Photographers, videographers, artists 25,593 ! ! ! ! 10,901 ! 6,171 17,422 ! ! 7,980 ! 3,493 Pew Research Center, American Society of News Editors, 2013
  32. PhotojournalistsamonghardesthitbyU.S.jobcuts 2000 2005 2010 2012 Reporters, writers ! ! ! ! ! Copy editors, layout editors, online producers ! Photographers, videographers, artists 25,593 ! ! ! ! 10,901 ! 6,171 -32 ! ! -27 ! -43 Pew Research Center, American Society of News Editors, 2013
  33. Major
 findings
  34. 100 photos contributed by
 the public (user generated content) 100 photos taken by 
 professional photojournalists + 200 photos
  35. People spent 50 percent longer with 
 the professional photographs in the study FINDINGS User-submitted
 news photographs Professional
 photojournalism
  36. People were able to identify a professionally 
 taken photo 90 percent of the time. ! ! ! FINDINGS
  37. Average time spent looking at professional photographs in the study: FINDINGS Faces 36% 33% Captions
  38. Average time spent looking at professional photographs in the study: FINDINGS 14% Bodies Faces 36% 33% Captions 10% Details 7% Other
  39. FINDINGS Each of the highest rated photographs in the study 
 was taken by a professional photojournalist.
  40. FINDINGS Of the 25 highest rated photos: ! ! ! ! ! ! Women, particularly older women, were 
 most likely to give a photo the highest rating. Older men were most likely to give a lower rating. Younger men least likely to give either the highest or lowest rating. ! News ! Features ! Sports 11 ! 9 ! 5 professional ! professional ! professional
  41. FINDINGS Professional photos in the study were
 twice as likely to be shared.
  42. What were people likely to share? FINDINGS
  43. Social media, e-mail or, 
 “Hey, you have to see this!” FINDINGS
  44. … Emotional, relatable photographs. FINDINGS
  45. This dog, “Otto,” was the only UGC photograph 
 to make the list of most shareable photos. .
  46. OBSERVATIONS: People were drawn to faces, first, even in a complex image. People were drawn to faces first, even in a complex image.
  47. OBSERVATIONS: People were drawn to faces, first, even in a complex image.
  48. OBSERVATIONS: People were drawn first, to faces.
  49. OBSERVATIONS: People were drawn first, to faces.
  50. OBSERVATIONS: People were drawn first, to faces.
  51. FINDINGS EarlierPoyntereyetrackfindings…inlieu
 ofadominantelement,facesdrewattention.
  52. FINDINGS EarlierPoyntereyetrackfindings…inlieu
 ofadominantelement,facesdrewattention.
  53. FINDINGS EarlierPoyntereyetrackfindings…inlieu
 ofadominantelement,facesdrewattention.
  54. FINDINGS EarlierPoyntereyetrackfindings…inlieu
 ofadominantelement,facesdrewattention.
  55. FINDINGS EarlierPoyntereyetrackfindings…inlieu
 ofadominantelement,facesdrewattention.
  56. FINDINGS Test subjects showed great interest in
 interactions between people in a photo.
  57. They were also interested in the 
 interaction between people in the frame. FINDINGS “Emotional” content was often cited 
 as making a photo most interesting.
  58. FINDINGS Captions were well read in the study.
  59. FINDINGS The longer or better-developed a caption, 
 the more likely the photo itself received attention.
  60. OBSERVATIONS:
  61. People look back and forth between caption 
 and image, establishing context.
  62. FINDINGS Captions in our survey of user-generated 
 photographs tended to be poorly-developed.
  63. Mostmemorable?
  64. FINDINGS Each photo cited as “most memorable” was a professional image.
  65. MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS: “My gosh, this told a story. And, it immediately drew me in.”
  66. MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS: “The one of the two ladies leaving the dance floor. 
 You could tell that they were happy. The picture, itself, 
 told a good story. Not the caption—just the picture itself.”
  67. MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS: “The two guys hugging. It captured emotion. It was being in 
 the right place and capturing the photo at exactly the right time.”
  68. MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS: “A girl being happy and young and carefree over this very, 
 very somber place. It was just a great picture.”
  69. MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS: “The little girl—there’s obviously the contrast between life and death. 
 It was a natural photo that represented some very interesting ideas. 
 And the moment that it captured … it seemed very genuine.”
  70. MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS: “I’m not a sports person, at all. But … it’s a high quality photo, catching the moment—the guy being called out on whatever base it was. 
 I remember the emotion in the moment.”
  71. MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS: “A dramatic, human moment. Something that can tell the story on it’s own. 
 Something I don’t see. Like, the firefighters getting the bus driver out … 
 without that picture we would never have that perspective.”
  72. MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS: “There was like a split second where she let go of the golf club — and it 
 was crystal clear. It was up close. It caught a big moment. That’s the kind 
 of stuff I like to linger over, and just marvel at.”
  73. MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS: “Rich and beautifully colored. Technical perfection. Clarity of focus.”
  74. MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS: “The guy with a flamingo wrapped around his head. 
 It was such a fun, unexpected picture.”
  75. MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS: “The photographer would have had been laying on the ground! And, this is what we’ve all been feeling here in Minnesota. Ready for spring.”
  76. MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS: “It’s not that it’s rare, it’s that someone has decided to see it!”
  77. What is quality?
  78. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: People weren’t shy when describing what they didn’t like: — nothing of interest in that photo to me, personally — just the backs of heads
 — just another, every day moment — just someone smiling at the camera, posed
 — just a crowd shot
 — just another snapshot
 — just a cell phone picture
 — a line-up of people, rather than a moment
 — PR pictures, social media pictures — too far away from the subject — cropped funny — no story to it — not enough information
  79. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: People weren’t shy when describing what they didn’t like: — nothing of interest in that photo to me, personally — just the backs of heads
 — just another, every day moment — just someone smiling at the camera, posed
 — just a crowd shot
 — just another snapshot
 — just a cell phone picture
 — a line-up of people, rather than a moment
 — PR pictures, social media pictures — too far away from the subject — cropped funny — no story to it — not enough information
  80. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: People weren’t shy when describing what they didn’t like: — nothing of interest in that photo to me, personally — just the backs of heads
 — just another, every day moment — just someone smiling at the camera, posed
 — just a crowd shot
 — just another snapshot
 — just a cell phone picture
 — a line-up of people, rather than a moment
 — PR pictures, social media pictures — too far away from the subject — cropped funny — no story to it — not enough information
  81. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: People weren’t shy when describing what they didn’t like: — nothing of interest in that photo to me, personally — just the backs of heads
 — just another, every day moment — just someone smiling at the camera, posed
 — just a crowd shot
 — just another snapshot
 — just a cell phone picture
 — a line-up of people, rather than a moment
 — PR pictures, social media pictures — too far away from the subject — cropped funny — no story to it — not enough information
  82. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: People weren’t shy when describing what they didn’t like: — nothing of interest in that photo to me, personally — just the backs of heads
 — just another, every day moment — just someone smiling at the camera, posed
 — just a crowd shot
 — just another snapshot
 — just a cell phone picture
 — a line-up of people, rather than a moment
 — PR pictures, social media pictures — too far away from the subject — cropped funny — no story to it — not enough information
  83. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: People weren’t shy when describing what they didn’t like: — nothing of interest in that photo to me, personally — just the backs of heads
 — just another, every day moment — just someone smiling at the camera, posed
 — just a crowd shot
 — just another snapshot
 — just a cell phone picture
 — a line-up of people, rather than a moment
 — PR pictures, social media pictures — too far away from the subject — cropped funny — no story to it — not enough information
  84. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: People weren’t shy when describing what they didn’t like: — nothing of interest in that photo to me, personally — just the backs of heads
 — just another, every day moment — just someone smiling at the camera, posed
 — just a crowd shot
 — just another snapshot
 — just a cell phone picture
 — a line-up of people, rather than a moment
 — PR pictures, social media pictures — too far away from the subject — cropped funny — no story to it — not enough information
  85. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: “Poor quality” “TV stations that say, 
 ‘Hey, send us pictures 
 from your backyard!’ ” ! ! ! !
  86. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: “A few grip-and-grins, 
 and people holding up fish.” ! ! ! ! ! “Poor quality”
  87. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: Words to describe “less than quality” photos: “A few grip-and-grins, 
 and people holding up fish.” ! ! ! ! !
  88. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: “I can see them going in, to get the glasses for the 
 eclipse … but, it would have been great to see the glasses.” Lowest quality ratings:
  89. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: “Just a bunch of people, standing in a line.” Lowest quality ratings:
  90. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: “I just don’t care! I don’t know who you are. I don’t know
 what’s going on in the game. It doesn’t seem newsworthy. Maybe with social media … but news, no.” Lowest quality ratings:
  91. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: “I looked and looked, but a photo of a dock where 
 a boat floated away isn’t much of a photo.” Lowest quality ratings:
  92. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: “The subject of this is barely in the picture.” Lowest quality ratings:
  93. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: “Quality” photos: — tells me a story vs. just capturing a scene ! — the right place at the right time ! — kismet, in terms of the moment ! — subject matter that has some currency or relevance ! — capturing the exact moment that’s crucial to the action
 — dramatic, human moments ! — makes you say “wow” ! — a perspective I might never see ! ! !
  94. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: “Quality” photos: — tells me a story vs. just capturing a scene ! — the right place at the right time ! — kismet, in terms of the moment ! — subject matter that has some currency or relevance ! — capturing the exact moment that’s crucial to the action
 — dramatic, human moments ! — makes you say “wow” ! — a perspective I might never see ! ! !
  95. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: “Quality” photos: — tells me a story vs. just capturing a scene ! — the right place at the right time ! — kismet, in terms of the moment ! — subject matter that has some currency or relevance ! — capturing the exact moment that’s crucial to the action
 — dramatic, human moments ! — makes you say “wow” ! — a perspective I might never see ! ! !
  96. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: “Quality” photos: — tells me a story vs. just capturing a scene ! — the right place at the right time ! — kismet, in terms of the moment ! — subject matter that has some currency or relevance ! — capturing the exact moment that’s crucial to the action
 — dramatic, human moments ! — makes you say “wow” ! — a perspective I might never see ! ! !
  97. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: “Quality” photos: — tells me a story vs. just capturing a scene ! — the right place at the right time ! — kismet, in terms of the moment ! — subject matter that has some currency or relevance ! — capturing the exact moment that’s crucial to the action
 — dramatic, human moments ! — makes you say “wow” ! — a perspective I might never see ! ! !
  98. FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: “Quality” photos: — tells me a story vs. just capturing a scene ! — the right place at the right time ! — kismet, in terms of the moment ! — subject matter that has some currency or relevance ! — capturing the exact moment that’s crucial to the action
 — dramatic, human moments ! — makes you say “wow” ! — a perspective I might never see ! ! !
  99. What makes 
 a photo worth publishing?
  100. SELECTED COMMENTS FROM EXIT INTERVIEWS: “(A photo where) someone’s recognizing the detail in something. If I feel like I’m actually seeing what they’re seeing.” ! ! ! !
  101. Here’s why this was worth your time.
  102. Peopleclearlyrecognizethequality
 ofprofessionallygeneratedphotos. HERE’S WHY THIS IS WORTH YOUR TIME
  103. Themostmemorablephotosin
 thisstudyweretakenbyprofessionals. HERE’S WHY THIS IS WORTH YOUR TIME
  104. Peopleequatequalityphotography withcontext,emotionandstorytelling. HERE’S WHY THIS IS WORTH YOUR TIME
  105. Peopleshowinterestininteractions betweenpeopleinaphoto. HERE’S WHY THIS IS WORTH YOUR TIME
  106. Moreattentionisdrawntophotos
 ofrealpeople,doingthingsinrealtime —ratherthanstaticorposedphotos. HERE’S WHY THIS IS WORTH YOUR TIME
  107. Goodcaptionsmatterforcontext. HERE’S WHY THIS IS WORTH YOUR TIME
  108. Captionswithprofessionalimages
 aregenerallymoredevelopedthan UGCimages. HERE’S WHY THIS IS WORTH YOUR TIME
  109. Moretimeisspentwithphotographs thathavestrongcontext: ! a genuine moment ! interaction/relationships ! emotion ! well-developed caption ! rare perspective ! storytelling ! HERE’S WHY THIS IS WORTH YOUR TIME
  110. Some photos are purely informational.
  111. Others show
 us time, place, moment and story.
  112. Questions? @saraquinn ! #eyetrackphoto nppa.org
  113. Questions? @saraquinn @kmcbride

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