Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.
 
	
  
	
  
1	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
Aero-chopper
	
  
	
   (VTOL)
Supervisor: Mr. Nasser Chakra
	
  
	
  
	
   	
  
	
  
by,
...
 
	
  
	
  
2	
  
	
  
Table of Content
INTRODUCTION	
  .....................................................................
 
	
  
	
  
3	
  
	
  
CONSTRUCTION	
  (ASSEMBLY)	
  ........................................................................
 
	
  
	
  
4	
  
	
  
Acknowledgement
Of the many people who have been enormously helpful in the preparation of this
proj...
 
	
  
	
  
5	
  
	
  
INTRODUCTION1
	
  
Figure	
  1	
  
	
  
UAV	
  is	
  an	
  acronym	
  for	
  Unmanned	
  Aerial	
  ...
 
	
  
	
  
6	
  
	
  
Aircraft	
  System)	
  to	
  reflect	
  the	
  fact	
  that	
  these	
  complex	
  systems	
  inclu...
 
	
  
	
  
7	
  
	
  
developments,	
  and	
  the	
  overall	
  value	
  and	
  rate	
  of	
  expansion	
  of	
  the	
  f...
 
	
  
	
  
8	
  
	
  
Understanding the Project
AIM
The	
  Aim	
  of	
  this	
  project	
  is	
  to	
  design	
  and	
  c...
 
	
  
	
  
9	
  
	
  
The	
  success	
  of	
  this	
  model	
  could	
  be	
  a	
  breakthrough	
  for	
  larger	
  scale...
 
	
  
	
  
10	
  
	
  
Parametric Study
The	
  aircrafts	
  made	
  with	
  the	
  similar	
  concept	
  is	
  taken	
  i...
 
	
  
	
  
11	
  
	
  
Specification
Motors	
  -­‐	
  AXI	
  2212/26	
  
Propellers	
  -­‐	
  MPI	
  MAXX	
  PRODUCTS	
  ...
 
	
  
	
  
12	
  
	
  
V-­‐22	
  OSPREY	
  MODEL	
  
	
  
Figure	
  3
2
	
  
	
  
Specifications and details
Dimension
- ...
 
	
  
	
  
13	
  
	
  
Structure
- Primary	
  –	
  Balsa	
  wood	
  
- Secondary	
  –	
  Carbon	
  rods	
  and	
  aluminu...
 
	
  
	
  
14	
  
	
  
Specifications and details (AERO-CHOPPER)
Dimensions
- Length	
  –	
  39	
  inches	
  
- Span	
  –...
 
	
  
	
  
15	
  
	
  
Empennage:
	
  Horizontal	
  and	
  vertical	
  stabilizer	
  –	
  conventional	
  
Engine	
  moun...
 
	
  
	
  
16	
  
	
  
Mission
Objectives
• Design	
  and	
  construct	
  a	
  hybrid	
  aircraft	
  of	
  a	
  helicopte...
 
	
  
	
  
17	
  
	
  
GANTT CHART
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
 
	
  
	
  
18	
  
	
  
	
  
 
	
  
	
  
19	
  
	
  
DESIGN CONCEPT
The	
  concept	
  of	
  Aero-­‐chopper	
  is	
  very	
  simple	
  but	
  involves	
...
 
	
  
	
  
20	
  
	
  
	
  
Figure	
  5	
  
	
  
The	
  Aero-­‐chopper	
  should	
  also	
  have	
  the	
  capability	
  ...
 
	
  
	
  
21	
  
	
  
COST ANALYSIS
Man hours analysis
Table	
  2	
  
WBS	
   Sheet:	
  1	
   Analysis	
  in	
  hours	
 ...
 
	
  
	
  
22	
  
	
  
	
  	
   Electricals	
  and	
  Servos	
  purchase(separate	
  sheet)	
   5	
   5	
   0	
  
	
  	
 ...
 
	
  
	
  
23	
  
	
  
MAN POWER
Table	
  3	
  
Days	
  for	
  the	
  Project	
   90	
  days	
  
	
  
Days	
  devoted	
  ...
 
	
  
	
  
24	
  
	
  
Cost analysis
Table	
  4	
  
WBS	
   Sheet:	
  2	
   Analysis	
  in	
  costs	
  
Activity	
  descr...
 
	
  
	
  
25	
  
	
  
	
  	
   Electricals	
  and	
  Servos	
  purchase(separate	
  sheet)	
   6000	
   7740	
   1740	
 ...
 
	
  
	
  
26	
  
	
  
Cost of materials and electricals
Table	
  5	
  
Items	
   Quantity	
   Cost	
  per	
  piece(aed)	...
 
	
  
	
  
27	
  
	
  
Materials3
Balsa wood
Figure	
  7	
  
	
  
Balsa	
  wood	
  is	
  the	
  main	
  material	
  that	...
 
	
  
	
  
28	
  
	
  
Table	
  6	
  
Component	
   Material	
   Thickness	
  
flat	
  fuselage	
  sides,	
  	
  wing	
  ...
 
	
  
	
  
29	
  
	
  
E-poxy Glue
Figure	
  9	
  
	
  
Epoxy	
  is	
  a	
  strong,	
  important	
  modeling	
  glue	
  b...
 
	
  
	
  
30	
  
	
  
Tools
	
  
Drill tools
Figure	
  11	
  
	
  
We	
  used	
  a	
  small	
  hand	
  drill	
  to	
  dr...
 
	
  
	
  
31	
  
	
  
We	
  used	
  a	
  normal	
  cutter	
  as	
  it	
  was	
  very	
  useful	
  to	
  cut	
  the	
  ba...
 
	
  
	
  
32	
  
	
  
ELECTRICALS4
MOTORS
Main	
  wing	
  motors(2	
  on	
  the	
  either	
  sides	
  of	
  the	
  wing)...
 
	
  
	
  
33	
  
	
  
• High-­‐quality	
  construction	
  with	
  ball	
  bearings	
  and	
  hardened	
  steel	
  shaft	...
 
	
  
	
  
34	
  
	
  
Overall	
  Diameter:	
   35mm	
  (1.40	
  in)	
  
Shaft	
  Diameter:	
   5mm	
  (.20	
  in)	
  
Ov...
 
	
  
	
  
35	
  
	
  
• High-­‐torque,	
  direct-­‐drive	
  alternative	
  to	
  in-­‐runner	
  brushless	
  motors	
  	...
 
	
  
	
  
36	
  
	
  
Continuous	
  Current:	
   10A	
  
Maximum	
  Burst	
  Current:	
   12A	
  (15	
  sec)	
  
Cells:	...
 
	
  
	
  
37	
  
	
  
ELECTRONIC SPEED CONTROLLER
ESC	
  Eletronic	
  Speed	
  Control	
  Detrum	
  30-­‐40a	
  2-­‐6s	
...
 
	
  
	
  
38	
  
	
  
BATTERY
Esky	
  EK1-­‐0186	
  20C	
  11.1v	
  1800mah	
  Li-­‐Polymer	
  battery	
  
Figure	
  19	...
 
	
  
	
  
39	
  
	
  
Radio
JR	
  Propo	
  DSX7	
  7-­‐Channel	
  2.4GHz	
  Computer	
  Radio	
  Control	
  System	
  (D...
 
	
  
	
  
40	
  
	
  
	
  
Content
JR	
  Propo	
  DSX7	
  Transmitter	
  2.4GHz	
  DSMJ	
  	
  
RD731	
  7Ch	
  2.4GHz	
...
 
	
  
	
  
41	
  
	
  
3-­‐axis	
  dual	
  rate	
  and	
  expo	
  	
  
3-­‐position	
  flap	
  (Airplane)	
  	
  
5-­‐poi...
 
	
  
	
  
42	
  
	
  
Airfoil Selection5
Airfoil	
  used	
  –	
  NACA	
  2414	
  
As	
  this	
  airfoil	
  seems	
  to	
...
 
	
  
	
  
43	
  
	
  
	
  
Figure	
  22	
  
NACA	
  2414	
  
	
  
Figure	
  23	
  
Thickness:	
   14.0%	
  	
  
Camber:	...
 
	
  
	
  
44	
  
	
  
	
  
	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  
	
   	
  
	
   	
   	
   	
  
	
   	
  
	
   	
   	
   	
  
	
   	
 ...
 
	
  
	
  
45	
  
	
  
	
  
Figure	
  26	
  
	
  
	
  
From	
  the	
  above	
  figures	
  NACA	
  2414	
  is	
  the	
  mo...
 
	
  
	
  
46	
  
	
  
Ribs	
  shapes	
  generated	
  with	
  the	
  help	
  of	
  the	
  software	
  "profili"	
  
	
  
...
 
	
  
	
  
47	
  
	
  
AIRCRAFT DESIGN
The	
  2-­‐D	
  drawing	
  that	
  guided	
  through	
  the	
  dimensions	
  and	
...
 
	
  
	
  
48	
  
	
  
Side view
	
  
Figure	
  29	
  
	
  
	
  
Front view
	
  
Figure	
  30	
  
 
	
  
	
  
49	
  
	
  
Structure designing :(PROFILI)
Wing	
  structure	
  with	
  ribs	
  placements	
  designed	
  with...
 
	
  
	
  
50	
  
	
  
Figure	
  32	
  
	
  
	
  
Figure	
  33	
  
	
  
	
  
 
	
  
	
  
51	
  
	
  
Rib structure Design on AutoCAD
	
  
Wing with ribs placement
	
  
	
  
	
  
 
	
  
	
  
52	
  
	
  
Fuselage ribs and wing ribs placement
	
  
	
  
	
  
Spars supporting the ribs
	
  
Total structur...
 
	
  
	
  
53	
  
	
  
	
  
 
	
  
	
  
54	
  
	
  
3D Drawing
Side view
	
  
Figure	
  34	
  
	
  
Bottom view
	
  
Figure	
  35	
  
	
  
 
	
  
	
  
55	
  
	
  
Top view
	
  
Figure	
  36	
  
	
  
 
	
  
	
  
56	
  
	
  
Circuits
Tilt	
  rotor	
  circuit	
  
Figure	
  37	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  ...
 
	
  
	
  
57	
  
	
  
Servo	
  circuit	
  
	
  
Figure	
  41	
  
	
  
 
	
  
	
  
58	
  
	
  
CONSTRUCTION (ASSEMBLY)
	
  
Figure	
  42	
  
The	
  Design(plan)	
  gave	
  us	
  a	
  green	
  s...
 
	
  
	
  
59	
  
	
  
	
  
Figure	
  43	
  
	
  
And	
  then	
  all	
  the	
  shapes	
  were	
  cut	
  with	
  the	
  he...
 
	
  
	
  
60	
  
	
  
Starting	
  with	
  the	
  wing,	
  which	
  had	
  the	
  following	
  units:	
  
• 8	
  airfoil	...
 
	
  
	
  
61	
  
	
  
	
  
Holes	
  	
  made	
  with	
  the	
  help	
  of	
  a	
  small	
  drilling	
  machine	
  done	
...
 
	
  
	
  
62	
  
	
  
Fuselage
	
  
	
  
Figure	
  49	
  
The	
  Fuselage	
  ribs	
  cut	
  accordingly	
  and	
  shaped...
 
	
  
	
  
63	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
Figure	
  53	
  
Spaces	
  at	
  the	
  sides	
  of	
  the	
  fuselage	
  ribs	
  provid...
 
	
  
	
  
64	
  
	
  
	
  
Figure	
  55	
  
	
  
Figure	
  56	
  
The	
  center	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  wing	
  where	
 ...
 
	
  
	
  
65	
  
	
  
	
  
Figure	
  57	
  
Ply	
  wood	
  used	
  for	
  the	
  support	
  of	
  the	
  wing	
  structu...
 
	
  
	
  
66	
  
	
  
Engine Mount
	
  
Figure	
  59	
  
The	
  engines	
  placed	
  on	
  the	
  either	
  sides	
  of	...
 
	
  
	
  
67	
  
	
  
Tail wing
	
  
Figure	
  61	
  
The	
  tail-­‐wing	
  includes	
  the	
  horizontal	
  stabilizer	...
 
	
  
	
  
68	
  
	
  
	
  
Figure	
  63	
  
The	
  total	
  internal	
  structure	
  is	
  constructed.	
  
Figure	
  64...
 
	
  
	
  
69	
  
	
  
Tilt-Rotor mechanism structure
	
  
The	
  tilt	
  rotor	
  section,	
  constructed	
  accordingly...
 
	
  
	
  
70	
  
	
  
	
  
Figure	
  70	
  
Wing	
  at	
  the	
  tilt	
  position	
  for	
  the	
  hovering	
  part	
  o...
 
	
  
	
  
71	
  
	
  
Tail-­‐motor	
  fixed	
  with	
  the	
  mount	
  supporting	
  it	
  and	
  giving	
  the	
  prope...
 
	
  
	
  
72	
  
	
  
	
  
Battery	
  holder	
  is	
  made	
  by	
  creating	
  a	
  space	
  exactly	
  measured	
  for...
 
	
  
	
  
73	
  
	
  
	
  
Tilt-­‐Rotor	
  Aircraft	
  sheeting,	
  shaped	
  and	
  painted.	
  
	
  
Figure	
  79	
  
...
 
	
  
	
  
74	
  
	
  
GRAPHS6
The	
  graphs	
  that	
  we	
  are	
  going	
  to	
  use	
  are	
  the	
  following	
  
Th...
 
	
  
	
  
75	
  
	
  
	
  
Figure	
  82	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
Figure	
  83
7
	
  
	
  
	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  ...
 
	
  
	
  
76	
  
	
  
	
  
Figure	
  84	
  
	
  
Figure	
  85
	
  
 
	
  
	
  
77	
  
	
  
Table	
  8	
  
	
  
	
  
 
	
  
	
  
78	
  
	
  
Area Calculation
CALCULATIONS:
Wing
	
  
	
  
Drawing	
  1	
  
	
  
Drawing	
  2	
  
Rectangle	
  ...
 
	
  
	
  
79	
  
	
  
	
  
Drawing	
  3	
  
Rectangle	
  
Area	
  	
  =	
  	
  l	
  x	
  b	
  
	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	...
 
	
  
	
  
80	
  
	
  
	
  
Drawing	
  5	
  
	
  
Area	
  	
  	
  	
  =	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  4.1455inch2
	
  	
  	
  =	...
 
	
  
	
  
81	
  
	
  
Horizontal Stabilizer
	
  
Drawing	
  6	
  
Rectangle	
  
Area	
  	
  	
  	
  =	
  	
  l	
  x	
  b...
 
	
  
	
  
82	
  
	
  
Vertical Stabilizer
	
  
Drawing	
  7	
  
Rectangle	
  
Area	
  	
  =	
  	
  l	
  x	
  b	
  	
  	
...
 
	
  
	
  
83	
  
	
  
w	
  	
  =	
  	
  5.1cm	
  
h	
  	
  =	
  	
  5.1cm	
  
Area	
  of	
  cuboid	
  	
  =	
  	
  2	
  ...
 
	
  
	
  
84	
  
	
  
Fins
	
  
Drawing	
  10	
  
Triangle	
  
Area	
  	
  	
  =	
  	
  1/2	
  b	
  h	
  	
  =	
  1/2	
 ...
 
	
  
	
  
85	
  
	
  
Landing Gear Hold
	
  
Drawing	
  11	
  
Airfoil	
  area	
  	
  -­‐	
  	
  2.7910cm2
	
  	
  =	
  ...
 
	
  
	
  
86	
  
	
  
Top and Bottom surface
	
  
Drawing	
  13	
  
Area	
  	
  	
  =	
  	
  l	
  	
  x	
  	
  b	
  	
  ...
 
	
  
	
  
87	
  
	
  
Area of Fuselage
	
  
	
  
Drawing	
  14	
  
Area	
  of	
  the	
  fuselage	
  side	
  section	
  
...
 
	
  
	
  
88	
  
	
  
Area	
  B	
  
	
  
Drawing	
  16	
  
Area	
  of	
  Trapezium	
  	
  	
  =	
  	
  	
  (a	
  +	
  b)...
 
	
  
	
  
89	
  
	
  
D	
  
	
  
Drawing	
  19	
  
Can	
  be	
  assumed	
  as:	
  
Area	
  	
  	
  =	
  	
  l	
  	
  x	
...
 
	
  
	
  
90	
  
	
  
Rectangle	
  
Area	
  	
  	
  =	
  	
  l	
  	
  x	
  	
  b	
  =	
  7.8	
  	
  x	
  	
  23.2	
  	
 ...
 
	
  
	
  
91	
  
	
  
Fuselage(TOP AND BOTTOM)
	
  
Drawing	
  22	
  
	
   	
  
 
	
  
	
  
92	
  
	
  
A'	
  
	
  
Drawing	
  23	
  
Area	
  of	
  trapezium	
  
	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  ...
 
	
  
	
  
93	
  
	
  
C'	
  
	
  
Drawing	
  25	
  
Area	
  	
  	
  =	
  	
  l	
  	
  x	
  	
  b	
  	
  =	
  	
  13	
  	...
 
	
  
	
  
94	
  
	
  
E'	
  
	
  
Drawing	
  27	
  
Area	
  	
  =	
  	
  	
  l	
  	
  x	
  	
  b	
  	
  =	
  	
  13	
  	...
 
	
  
	
  
95	
  
	
  
Total Area of Fuselage(TOP)
Area	
  A'	
  +	
  B'	
  +	
  C'	
  +	
  D'	
  +	
  E'	
  +	
  	
  F'	...
 
	
  
	
  
96	
  
	
  
Total	
  Area	
  of	
  Fins	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
 ...
 
	
  
	
  
97	
  
	
  
PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS
LIFT
Airfoil	
  used	
  is	
  NACA	
  2414	
  
The	
  software	
  profili	
  ...
 
	
  
	
  
98	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
During Landing
The	
  Cl	
  is	
  at	
  max	
  	
  	
  =	
  	
  	
  1.379	
  
V2
	
  	
 ...
 
	
  
	
  
99	
  
	
  
Vstall	
  is	
  the	
  lowest	
  speed	
  at	
  which	
  steady	
  controllable	
  flight	
  can	
...
 
	
  
	
  
100	
  
	
  
OR	
  
	
  
Around	
  70%	
  of	
  CLMAX	
  
	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  ...
 
	
  
	
  
101	
  
	
  
	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	...
 
	
  
	
  
102	
  
	
  
	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  
V	
  	
  	
  =	
  	
  	
  	
  1.4607 * 10-5
	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  ...
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
AeroChopper(VTOL concept)
Prochain SlideShare
Chargement dans…5
×

AeroChopper(VTOL concept)

1 050 vues

Publié le

  • Identifiez-vous pour voir les commentaires

AeroChopper(VTOL concept)

  1. 1.       1         Aero-chopper     (VTOL) Supervisor: Mr. Nasser Chakra           by, Shashank Dathatreya  
  2. 2.       2     Table of Content INTRODUCTION  ...............................................................................................................................  4   UAV  Types  ...................................................................................................................................  6   Understanding  the  Project  ..............................................................................................................  8   AIM  ..............................................................................................................................................  8   ABSTRACT  ....................................................................................................................................  8   SCOPE  ..........................................................................................................................................  8   Parametric  Study  ...........................................................................................................................  10   Specifications  and  details  ..........................................................................................................  12   Specifications  and  details  ..........................................................................................................  14   GANTT  CHART  ................................................................................................................................  17   DESIGN  CONCEPT  ..........................................................................................................................  19   COST  ANALYSIS  ..............................................................................................................................  21   MAN  POWER  .................................................................................................................................  23   Cost  analysis  ..................................................................................................................................  24   Cost  of  materials  and  electricals  ...............................................................................................  26   Materials  .......................................................................................................................................  27   Tools  ..........................................................................................................................................  30   ELECTRICALS  ..............................................................................................................................  32   Overview  ...................................................................................................................................  33   Overview  ...................................................................................................................................  35   Airfoil  Selection  .............................................................................................................................  42   AIRCRAFT  DESIGN  ..........................................................................................................................  47   Structure  designing  :(PROFILI)  .......................................................................................................  49   3D  Drawing  ....................................................................................................................................  54  
  3. 3.       3     CONSTRUCTION  (ASSEMBLY)  ........................................................................................................  58   GRAPHS  .........................................................................................................................................  74   Area  Calculation  ............................................................................................................................  78   PERFORMANCE  ANALYSIS  .............................................................................................................  97   CENTRE  OF  GRAVITY  ....................................................................................................................  128   PERFORMANCE  ANALYSIS  ...........................................................................................................  132   Troubleshooting  ..........................................................................................................................  135   Safety  and  Risk  Assessment  ........................................................................................................  138   CONCLUSION  ...............................................................................................................................  139    
  4. 4.       4     Acknowledgement Of the many people who have been enormously helpful in the preparation of this project, we are especially thankful to, Mr. Nasser Chakra for his help and support in guiding us to through to its successful completion. We would also like to extend our since gratitude to Emirates Aviation College for the use of their resources, such as online databases and library, without which the completion of this project would have been extremely difficult. A very special recognition needs to be given to Ms. Kavita, our librarian, for her extensive help and support during research and in dealing with online resources. In addition, a special thanks to our friends Cibin, Suraj and Yogesh for their help, consideration and guidance. Last but not least, we would like to say a special thank you to our parents and family members for their moral and financial support this semester.  
  5. 5.       5     INTRODUCTION1   Figure  1     UAV  is  an  acronym  for  Unmanned  Aerial  Vehicle,  which  is  an  aircraft  with  no  pilot  on  board.   UAVs  can  be  remote  controlled  aircraft,  for  example,  flown  by  a  pilot  at  a    ground  control   station,  or  can  fly  autonomously  based  on  pre-­‐programmed  flight  plans  or  more  complex   dynamic  automation  systems.  UAVs  are  currently  used  for  a  number  of  missions,  including   reconnaissance  and  attack  roles.  To  distinguish  UAVs  from  missiles,  a  UAV  is  defined  as  being   capable  of  controlled,  sustained  level  flight  and  powered  by  a  jet  or  reciprocating  engine.  In   addition,  a  cruise  missile  can  be  considered  to  be  a  UAV,  but  is  treated  separately  on  the  basis   that  the  vehicle  is  the  weapon.  The  acronym  UAV  has  been  expanded  in  some  cases  to  UAVS   (Unmanned  Aircraft  Vehicle  System).  The  FAA  has  adopted  the  acronym  UAS  (Unmanned                                                                                                                             1. 1  http://www.theuav.com/    
  6. 6.       6     Aircraft  System)  to  reflect  the  fact  that  these  complex  systems  include  ground  stations  and   other  elements  besides  the  actual  air  vehicles.   Officially,  the  term  'Unmanned  Aerial  Vehicle'  was  changed  to  'Unmanned  Aircraft  System'  to   reflect  the  fact  that  these  complex  systems  include  ground  stations  and  other  elements  besides   the  actual  air  vehicles.  The  term  UAS,  however,  is  not  widely  used  as  the  term  UAV  has  become   part  of  the  modern  lexicon.   UAV Types • Target  and  decoy  -­‐  providing  ground  and  aerial  gunnery  a  target  that  simulates   an  enemy  aircraft  or  missile     • Reconnaissance  -­‐  providing  battlefield  intelligence     • Combat   -­‐   providing   attack   capability   for   high-­‐risk   missions   (see   Unmanned   Combat  Air  Vehicle)     • Research   and   development   -­‐   used   to   further   develop   UAV   technologies   to   be   integrated  into  field  deployed  UAV  aircraft     • Civil  and  Commercial  UAVs  -­‐  UAVs  specifically  designed  for  civil  and  commercial   applications.     Degree  of  Autonomy   Some  early  UAVs  are  called  drones  because  they  are  no  more  sophisticated  than  a  simple  radio   controlled  aircraft  being  controlled  by  a  human  pilot  (sometimes  called  the  operator)  at  all   times.  More  sophisticated  versions  may  have  built-­‐in  control  and/or  guidance  systems  to   perform  low  level  human  pilot  duties  such  as  speed  and  flight  path  stabilization,  and  simple   prescript  navigation  functions  such  as  waypoint  following.   From  this  perspective,  most  early  UAVs  are  not  autonomous  at  all.  In  fact,  the  field  of  air  vehicle   autonomy  is  a  recently  emerging  field,  whose  economics  is  largely  driven  by  the  military  to   develop  battle  ready  technology  for  the  war  fighter.  Compared  to  the  manufacturing  of  UAV   flight  hardware,  the  market  for  autonomy  technology  is  fairly  immature  and  undeveloped.   Because  of  this,  autonomy  has  been  and  may  continue  to  be  the  bottleneck  for  future  UAV  
  7. 7.       7     developments,  and  the  overall  value  and  rate  of  expansion  of  the  future  UAV  market  could  be   largely  driven  by  advances  to  be  made  in  the  field  of  autonomy.   Autonomy  technology  that  will  become  important  to  future  UAV  development  falls  under  the   following  categories:   • Sensor  fusion:  Combining  information  from  different  sensors  for  use  on  board   the  vehicle     • Communications:  Handling  communication  and  coordination  between  multiple   agents  in  the  presence  of  incomplete  and  imperfect  information     • Motion   planning   (also   called   Path   planning):   Determining   an   optimal   path   for   vehicle  to  go  while  meeting  certain  objectives  and  constraints,  such  as  obstacles     • Trajectory   Generation:   Determining   an   optimal   control   maneuver   to   take   to   follow  a  given  path  or  to  go  from  one  location  to  another     • Task   Allocation   and   Scheduling:   Determining   the   optimal   distribution   of   tasks   amongst  a  group  of  agents,  with  time  and  equipment  constraints     • Cooperative  Tactics:  Formulating  an  optimal  sequence  and  spatial  distribution  of   activities  between  agents  in  order  to  maximize  chance  of  success  in  any  given   mission  scenario  
  8. 8.       8     Understanding the Project AIM The  Aim  of  this  project  is  to  design  and  construct  an  Unmanned  Aerial  Vehicle  which  will  be  a   hybrid  between  a  helicopter  and  an  airplane,  so  that  we  can  achieve  advantages  of  both   helicopter  and  airplane.   ABSTRACT The  purpose  of  this  project  is  to  design  and  construct  a  tilt-­‐rotor  aircraft  with  both  a  vertical   takeoff  and  landing.  The  aircraft  being  a  hybrid  of  airplane  and  helicopter,  which  gives  the   structure  a  superior  performance  and  enhanced  abilities  having  both  the  functions  of  a   helicopter  and  the  aircraft,  which  include  vertical  take-­‐off/landing  and  required  forward  speed.   The  model  aircraft  can  be  constructed  with  balsa  wood  or  any  composite  materials.  The   airframe  consists  of  the  fuselage,  which  is  the  main  component  of  the  airplane,  the  wings(large   section  of  the  aircraft),  and  the  empennage  (tail  section,  or  tail  feathers).    The  components  of   the  wings  and  tail  sections  are  also  known  as  the  control  surfaces  since  they  are  of  course   important  in  controlling  the  airplane.    The  attached  to  the  wings  are  flaps  and  ailerons.    The   empennage  is  the  tail  assembly  consisting  of  the  horizontal  stabilizers,  the  elevators,  the  vertical   stabilizer,  and  the  rudder.   SCOPE Scope  of  the  project  of  constructing  a  UAV  which  will  possess  the  capabilities  of  both  helicopter   and  airplane.  Many  reasons  to  this  purpose  ,  most  important  being  because  this  branch  of   aerospace  industry  has  not  fully  been  succeeded.  Their  success  is  limited  to  jet  aircraft  with   VTOL  which  use  thrust  vectoring  and  helicopters  which  use  cyclic  pitch  and  collective  pitch  to   hover.  
  9. 9.       9     The  success  of  this  model  could  be  a  breakthrough  for  larger  scale  models  and  eventually  there   could  be  a  new  era  of  transportation  where  the  private,  military  aircrafts  could  also  implement   this  concept  an  use  shorter  runway  for  take-­‐off  and  cruise  at  a  higher  speed.   One  of  the  main  advantages  of  this  type  of  aircraft  is  that  if  in  case  the  engine  fails,  the  aircraft   can  glide  and  land  as  a  normal  aircraft  since  it  has  wings  to  create  lift  unlike  helicopter,  similarly   vice  versa.  
  10. 10.       10     Parametric Study The  aircrafts  made  with  the  similar  concept  is  taken  into  this  parametric  study   RC  TWIN  VTOL  PROTOTYPE     Figure  2   Specifications and details Dimensions Length  -­‐  43  inches   Wingspan  -­‐  48  inches   Center  wing  -­‐  29  inches   Motor  spacing  -­‐  19  inches      
  11. 11.       11     Specification Motors  -­‐  AXI  2212/26   Propellers  -­‐  MPI  MAXX  PRODUCTS  counter  rotating  pair  10  x  4.5  slow  flyer   ESC  controller  -­‐  Castle  Creations  newer  phoenix  25  Amp  with  3  amp  BEC   Batteries  tested  -­‐  Polypus  PQ-­‐2100XP-­‐3S  2100ma  20  C  rated  167  grams  or  PD-­‐B2600N-­‐SP  3S   2600ma  12C  rates  192  grams   External  mixers  -­‐  2  VEE-­‐TAIL  OMNI  mixers   Aircraft  Structure  -­‐  1/4  inch  balsa  tail  and  fuselage,  2  @  8mm  diameter  carbon  fiber  tubes   C  of  G  -­‐  on  the  tilt  spar  tube  of  maximum  1/4  inch  front  of  the  C  of  G  -­‐30%  of  wing  chord   position  WING   Static  Thrust  -­‐  max  1300  grams   Weight  -­‐  920-­‐950  grams      
  12. 12.       12     V-­‐22  OSPREY  MODEL     Figure  3 2     Specifications and details Dimension - Length  –  38.5  inches   - Span  –    36  inches   - Center  wing  –  22  inches   - Weight  –  1500  g   Power  system  –  2  Scorpion  HK  2221-­‐10  motors   Propeller  –  APC  12  x  3.8  slow  flyer   Servos used - 2  HITEC  HS-­‐5085MG  (for  tilting  motors)   - 2  micro  servos  (for  controlling  movable  surfaces  )                                                                                                                             2. 2 2 http://www.theuav.com/
  13. 13.       13     Structure - Primary  –  Balsa  wood   - Secondary  –  Carbon  rods  and  aluminum  pipes   Electricals - Receiver  –  Futaba  R617FS   - Battery  –  Two  EM2200  4S   - ESC  –  Two  Phoenix  ICE  Lite  50SB   - Gyro  –  Three  Futaba  GY401   - Receiver  power  –  CC  regulator  20A  Pro   Airfoil used  –  NACA  2413   Wing used  –  Straight  wing   Empennage:  Horizontal  and  vertical  stabilizer  –  conventional   Adhesion - E-­‐poxy  30  minutes   - E-­‐poxy  5  minutes   - Hot  glue      
  14. 14.       14     Specifications and details (AERO-CHOPPER) Dimensions - Length  –  39  inches   - Span  –  34  inches   - Center  wing  –  22  inches   - Approximate  weight  estimation  –  2.5  to  3  kg   Power system  –  two  Power  electric  motors   Propeller  –  APC  12  x  3.8  slow  flyer     Servos used - 2  high  torque  and  high  speed  servo    (for  tilting  the  motors)   - 4  Micro  servos  (  for  controlling  movable  surfaces  )   Structure - Primarily  :  Balsa  wood   - Secondary  :  Carbon  rods  and  aluminum  pipes   Electricals - Minimum  9  channel  receiver  and  transmitter   - Minimum  3  gyros   - 2  external  V-­‐mixer   - Wire  extensions   - Y-­‐splitters   - Two  4cell  battery  packs   - 1  BEC   - 2  Electronic  Speed  Controllers  –  Minimum  60amps   Airfoil used  –  NACA  2414   Wing used  –  straight  single  high  wing  with  uniform  chord  
  15. 15.       15     Empennage:  Horizontal  and  vertical  stabilizer  –  conventional   Engine  mount  –  is  tilted  inwards  by  2.3degrees   Adhesion - Z-­‐poxy  30  minutes   - Z-­‐poxy  5  minutes    
  16. 16.       16     Mission Objectives • Design  and  construct  a  hybrid  aircraft  of  a  helicopter  and  an  airplane.   • Ensuring  stable  takeoff,  land  and  transition  from  hover  mode  to  forward  mode.   • Ensure  that  the  aircraft  has  an  average  endurance  of  a  minimum  15  minutes  in   hover  mode  or  normal  mode.   Outcomes • Gathering  information  about  How  VTOL  mechanism  works.   • The  type  of  wings  and  body  constructed  suitable  to  the  VTOL  concept   • Defining  a  set  of  parameters  that  we  want  the  plane  to  conform  to.   • Identify  the  materials  and  the  budget  required.   • Mathematical  and  aerodynamic  calculations  and  maneuver  calculation.   • Design  the  aircraft  in  a  2D  &  3D  sketch  on  AUTOCAD.   • Create  an  effective  launch  system  in  hover  mode.   • Experiment  the  prototype  model  &  troubleshoot  safety  &  related  issues.   • A  Presentation  of  the  aircraft.   Table  1                                                                                  SPECIFICATIONS   Wing  span  (A)   Span    <  1m     Type  of  Wing   Straight  wing           Weight   Weight  <  2kg     Fuselage  Length(a)   Length  <  1m    
  17. 17.       17     GANTT CHART                  
  18. 18.       18      
  19. 19.       19     DESIGN CONCEPT The  concept  of  Aero-­‐chopper  is  very  simple  but  involves  sophisticated  electrical  and  mechanics   for  it  to  work.   The  aircraft  will  be  a  twin  engine  and  the  engines  will  be  on  both  the  ends  of  the  wing  and  will   be  placed  exactly  on  the  C.G  of  the  aircraft  so  that  when  the  thrust  is  given,  and  if  the  aircraft  is   balanced  exactly  on  the  C.G(motors),  Aero-­‐chopper  should  lift  vertically.       Figure  4   The  control  of  Aero-­‐chopper  on  the  different  axis  will  be  done  by  moving  the  engines  and  also   by  powering  up  and  down  of  the  motors.   For  the  control  of  the  pitch,  Aero-­‐chopper  will  tilt  its  wing  anti-­‐clockwise  which  would  move  the   direction  of  the  propellers  too.  This  will  cause  a  change  in  the  pitch  of  the  aircraft.  
  20. 20.       20       Figure  5     The  Aero-­‐chopper  should  also  have  the  capability  to  tilt  its  engine  forward  about  45o  to  help  it   transit  from  Hover  mode  to  normal  aircraft  mode  where  its  engine  will  be  0o  (parallel  to  the   direction  of  flight)     Figure  6  
  21. 21.       21     COST ANALYSIS Man hours analysis Table  2   WBS   Sheet:  1   Analysis  in  hours   Activity  description   Est  to   complete   Est  @   complete   Variance       GANTT  CHART   2   3   1       Research   15   20   5       Aircraft  Design   25   40   15       Design  Approval   3   5   2       Parametric  Design   4   4   0       Airfoil  selection   2   2   0       3D  design   15   20   5       Mission   1   1   0       Selection  of  aircraft  parts   3   5   2       Cost  Analysis   2   2   0       Tools  and  Materials(separate  sheet)   10   16   6       Construction  plan  printing/Tracing   20   23   3       Cutting  of  material  parts  and  organizing   4   4   0       Construction  of  aircraft  structure  accordingly   45   55   10       Assembly  made  rigid  and  Shaping   3   4   1  
  22. 22.       22         Electricals  and  Servos  purchase(separate  sheet)   5   5   0       Custom  circuit  made  and  tested   4   5   1       Fixing  of  Electricals  and  Servos   10   13   3       Aircraft  performance  test   3   3   0       Performance  calculations   15   20   5       Centre  of  Gravity  placement/calculations   2   2   0       Flight  Test  -­‐  1   3   3   0       Painting  and  finishing  of  aircraft  structure   2   2   0       Flight  Test  -­‐  2   3   4   1       Final  Calculations   2   4   2       Flight  Test  -­‐  3   3   3   0       Project  report  writing   10   15   5       Finalization  of  Aircraft   1   1   0       Deliverable   2   2   0       TOTAL   219   286   67  
  23. 23.       23     MAN POWER Table  3   Days  for  the  Project   90  days     Days  devoted  to  the  project     70  days   Average  hours  worked  per  day     4hours/day   Total  hours  for  the  days  worked     45  x    4    =      180  hours   Average  Man  power  =  no.  of  persons/  hours     1/180     So  a  person  has  to  work  for  280  hours  on  this  project.  
  24. 24.       24     Cost analysis Table  4   WBS   Sheet:  2   Analysis  in  costs   Activity  description   Est  to   complete   Est  @   complete   Variance       GANTT  CHART   0   0   0       Research   0   30   30       Aircraft  Design   50   70   20       Design  Approval   50   65   15       Parametric  Design   0   0   0       Airfoil  selection   0   0   0       3D  design   0   0   0       Mission   0   0   0       Selection  of  aircraft  parts   0   0   0       Cost  Analysis   0   0   0       Tools  and  Materials(separate  sheet)   600   820   220       Construction  plan  printing/Tracing   50   85   35       Cutting  of  material  parts  and  organizing   30   35   5       Construction  of  aircraft  structure  accordingly   50   60   10       Assembly  made  rigid  and  Shaping   30   30   0  
  25. 25.       25         Electricals  and  Servos  purchase(separate  sheet)   6000   7740   1740       Custom  circuit  made  and  tested   0   0   0       Fixing  of  Electricals  and  Servos   0   30   30       Aircraft  performance  test   0   0   0       Performance  calculations   0   0   0       Centre  of  Gravity  placement/calculations   0   0   0       Flight  Test  -­‐  1   200   200   0       Painting  and  finishing  of  aircraft  structure   30   40   10       Flight  Test  -­‐  2   200   200   0       Final  Calculations   0   0   0       Flight  Test  -­‐  3   200   200   0       Project  report  writing   0   0   0       Finalization  of  Aircraft   0   0   0       Deliverable   50   50   0       TOAL   7540   9655   2115      
  26. 26.       26     Cost of materials and electricals Table  5   Items   Quantity   Cost  per  piece(aed)   Total  Amount  (aed)   Materials   Balsa  wood  pack   1   500   500   Glues   5   35   175   Sand  Paper   10   5   50   Cutter   3   15   45   Monocot   1   50   50   Electricals   Propellers   3   60   180   Electric  Speed  Control   3   480   1440   Battery   3   640   1920   Engine(Motor)   3   460   1380   Radio  unit   1   1000   1000   Landing  Gear  unit   1   500   500   Servo  pack   4   170   680   Servo(Tilt  rotor)   2   290   580   Hinges  pack   3   20   60   Total   43   4225   8560    
  27. 27.       27     Materials3 Balsa wood Figure  7     Balsa  wood  is  the  main  material  that  we  have  used  to  construct  the  aircraft.  Balsa  wood  is   lightweight,  inexpensive  and  relatively  strong.  We  have  used  it  to  construct  the  fuselage,  wing   and  tail-­‐plane  as  well  as  in  the  sheeting  of  the  plane.   Ply  wood     Figure  8   We  used  ply  wood  on  our  model  on  the  places  where  we  need  more  strength  like  the  root  rips   of  the  wing,  the  front  side  cover  of  the  fuselage,  servo  plates  etc.   The  materials  that  were  mainly  used  were  Balsa  and  Plywood                                                                                                                             3. 3  http://www.moneysmith.net/Soaring/soaring4.html    
  28. 28.       28     Table  6   Component   Material   Thickness   flat  fuselage  sides,    wing  ribs,  wing   spruces,  main  frame  of  fuselage,   servo  holder,  battery  pack  holder  ,   frame  and    landing  gear  support  area   etc.   B-­‐Grain    balsa  wood   4  mm   Elevator  ,horizontal    stabilizer,   vertical  stabilizer,  aileron  and  rudder   C-­‐grain  balsa  wood   3.2  mm   Covering  rounded  the  fuselage,   planking  fuselage  and  nose  and  wing   surface   A-­‐grain   1.5  mm   To  support  some  particular  area  like   inside  the  fuselage,    Tilt  roll  of  the   wing,  and  landing  gear  hold  and   support  area  etc.   we  used  very  small  amount  of  ply   wood  to  make  structure  strong.   Plywood   4  mm   Thickness ▬ Mostly  we  used  4mm  balsa  for  our  main  construction  like  wings  ,  flat  fuselage  sides,   wing  ribs,  formers,  trailing  edges  where  more  strength  are  required.   ▬ We  used    3.2  mm    for  body  where  it  is  not  required  to  be  very  strong  and  it’s  because  to   reduce  weight.  we  also  used  it  for  rudder,  elevator,  stabilizer,  other  attachments  etc.   ▬ In  our  project  used    1.5mm  where  it  is  required    for  covering.      
  29. 29.       29     E-poxy Glue Figure  9     Epoxy  is  a  strong,  important  modeling  glue  but  one  which  must  be  used  sparingly  because  of  its   heavy  weight.   Epoxy  is  classified  by  its  strength  and  working  time.  Quick  cure,  or  five  minute  epoxy,  is  strong   enough  for  most  modeling  applications,  and  is  very  handy  for  quick  repairs.  Slow  cure  (30   minute  or  more)  epoxy  is  used  when  extra  strength  is  required.   We  have  used  epoxy  to  join  the  major  parts  of  the  airplane.  This  includes  joining  the  wing   mounts  to  the  fuselage,  and  attaching  the  tail  to  the  fuselage.  We  have  also  used  slow  cure   epoxy  for  bonding  the  wood  skins  to  the  foam  wing  and  stabilizer  core.     Masking Tape Figure  10     We  used  masking  tape  for  minor  repairs  in  the  airplane.  Masking  tape  was  chosen  due  to  its   convenient  size,  shape  and  ease  of  removal.  It  was  mainly  used  for  fixing  small  cracks  in  the   balsa  wood.  
  30. 30.       30     Tools   Drill tools Figure  11     We  used  a  small  hand  drill  to  drill  holes  in  the  balsa  wood.  A  drill  press  was  also  used  to  make   sure  that  the  holes  were  straight.  Our  hand  drill  was  able  to  make  holes  of  2mm  thickness.   Protractor Figure  12     We  used  a  protractor  to  measure  various  angles  in  the  model  aircraft,  which  were  needed  in  the   calculations.  For  example,  we  used  it  to  measure  the  sweptback  angle  and  the  angle  of  the  tail   planes.   Cutter Figure  13    
  31. 31.       31     We  used  a  normal  cutter  as  it  was  very  useful  to  cut  the  balsa  wood,  it  easily  cut  through  the   wood  and  was  simple  to  handle.  We  sometimes  used  it  to  file  the  surface  of  the  wood  to  make  it   smooth  and  even.   Rulers   Figure  14       We  used  rulers  for  measuring  the  dimensions  of  the  aircraft  like  wingspan,  length  of  the   fuselage  etc.   Sand paper Figure  15     Sandpaper  is  used  to  remove  small  quantities  of  material  at  a  time  from  the  surface  of  an   object.  Sandpaper  can  be  used  to  remove  a  specific  material  from  an  object  (such  as  a  layer  of   paint)  or  to  level  and/or  smooth  the  surface  of  the  object.  Sandpaper  comes  in  many  numbered   "grades,"  with  smaller  numbers  being  coarser  and  removing  more  surface  material  with  each   pass.  Higher  numbers  are  finer  and  remove  less  material.   We  have  mostly  used  ‘low  grade’  sandpaper  for  polishing  and  smoothing  the  aircraft.  We  have   also  used  it  to  shape  the  ribs  and  spars  of  the  model  aircraft.  
  32. 32.       32     ELECTRICALS4 MOTORS Main  wing  motors(2  on  the  either  sides  of  the  wing)   Figure  16     Power  10  Brushless  Out-­‐runner  Motor,  1100Kv   Key Features • Equivalent  to  a  10-­‐size  glow  engine  for  32–48  ounce  (910–1360  g)  airplanes     • Ideal  for  3D  airplanes  weighing  28–36  ounces  (790–1020  g)     • Ideal  for  models  requiring  up  to  450  watts  of  power     • High-­‐torque,  direct-­‐drive  alternative  to  in-­‐runner  brushless  motors     • Includes  mount,  prop  adapters  and  mounting  hardware     • External  rotor  design—5mm  shaft  can  easily  be  reversed  for  alternative  motor   installations     • Slotted  14-­‐pole  out-­‐runner  design                                                                                                                               4. www.e-­‐fliterc.com/Products    
  33. 33.       33     • High-­‐quality  construction  with  ball  bearings  and  hardened  steel  shaft     • Quiet,  lightweight  operation   Overview The  Power  10  is  designed  to  deliver  clean  and  quiet  power  for  10-­‐size  sport  and  scale  airplanes   weighing  32  to  48  ounces  (910  to  1360  grams),  3D  airplanes  weighing  28  to  36  ounces  (790  to   1020  grams),  or  models  requiring  up  to  375  watts  of  power.  It’s  an  especially  good  match  for  the   E-­‐flite  Brio  10  for  high  speed  F3A  precision  or  artistic  aerobatics.     Product Specifications Type:   Brushless  out-­‐runner  motor   Size:   10-­‐size   Bearings  or  Bushings:   One  5  x  14  x  5mm  Bearing,  and  One  5  x  11  x  5mm  Bearing   Wire  Gauge:   16   Recommended  Prop  Range:   10x5–12x6   Voltage:   7.2–12   RPM/Volt  (Kv):   1100   Resistance  (Ri):   .043  ohms   Idle  Current  (Io):   2.10A  @10V   Continuous  Current:   32A   Maximum  Burst  Current:   42A  (15  sec)   Cells:   6–10  Ni-­‐MH/Ni-­‐Cd  or  2–3S  Li-­‐Po   Speed  Control:   35–40A  brushless   Weight:   122  g  (4.3  oz)  
  34. 34.       34     Overall  Diameter:   35mm  (1.40  in)   Shaft  Diameter:   5mm  (.20  in)   Overall  Length:   43mm  (1.60  in)     Needed  to  Complete   E-­‐flite  Brio  10   40A  ESC   6-­‐  to  10-­‐cell  Ni-­‐MH/Ni-­‐Cd  or  2–3S  Li-­‐Po   10x5  to  12x6  electric  props   Tail  Wing  motor(1  at  the  rear)   Figure  17     Park  370  BL  Outrunner,1200Kv  with  4mm  Hollow  Shaft   Key Features • Ideal  for  models  requiring  up  to  120  watts  of  power     • Optimized  windings  for  3D  performance    
  35. 35.       35     • High-­‐torque,  direct-­‐drive  alternative  to  in-­‐runner  brushless  motors     • Includes  mount,  prop  adapters  and  mounting  hardware     • 4mm  hollow  shaft  is  easily  reversed  for  alternative  motor  installations     • Excellent  motor  for  small  3D  airplanes  7–14  oz  (200–400  g)     • Extremely  lightweight—just  1.6  ounces     • Ideal   for   variable   pitch   props   such   as   the   E-­‐flite®   Showstopper   Variable   Pitch   Prop  System     • External  rotor  design  for  better  cooling     • High-­‐quality  construction  with  ball  bearings   Overview E-­‐flite’s  latest  Park  370  is  a  brushless  out-­‐runner  motor  that  features  a  4mm  hollow  shaft,  ideal   for  use  with  variable  pitch  propellers.  It’s  perfectly  designed  for  electric  models  equipped  with   variable-­‐pitch  propeller  systems,  such  as  the  E-­‐flite®  ShowStopper  VPP  system.  However,  you   don’t  need  a  VPP  to  use  this  motor—it’s  an  excellent  motor  for  small  3D  airplanes  that  weigh  7– 14  ounces.  A  motor  mount,  prop  adapter  and  all  hardware  are  included.   Product Specifications Type:   Brushless  out-­‐runner   Size:   Park  370   Bearings  or  Bushings:   One  4  x  8  x  4mm  Bearing,  and  One  4  x  9  x  4mm  Bearing   Recommended  Prop  Range:   8x3.8–10x4.7  or  Variable  Pitch  systems   Voltage:   7.2–12V   RPM/Volt  (Kv):   1200   Resistance  (Ri):   .18  ohms   Idle  Current  (Io):   .60A  
  36. 36.       36     Continuous  Current:   10A   Maximum  Burst  Current:   12A  (15  sec)   Cells:   6–10  Ni-­‐MH/Ni-­‐Cd  or  2–3S  Li-­‐Po   Speed  Control:   12–20A  Brushless   Weight:   45  g  (1.6  oz)   Overall  Diameter:   28mm  (1.10  in)   Shaft  Diameter:   4mm  (.16  in)  hollow   Overall  Length:   25mm  (1.00  in)     Needed  to  Complete   12–20A  brushless  ESC   2–3S  Li-­‐Po  or  6–10  Ni-­‐Cd/Ni-­‐MH   8x3.8–10x4.7  Slow  Flyer  Prop   Variable  Pitch  Prop  option        
  37. 37.       37     ELECTRONIC SPEED CONTROLLER ESC  Eletronic  Speed  Control  Detrum  30-­‐40a  2-­‐6s  LIXX  /  5-­‐18s  NC  -­‐  0km   Model:  E   Figure  18     • Model:  ESC-­‐40A     • Size(mm):  50  X  25  X  13     • Weight:  36g     • Current:40A     • NiCd/NiMh]  /servos:  6/5  8/5  10/4  12/3     • [Li-­‐xx]/servos:  2/5  3/4      
  38. 38.       38     BATTERY Esky  EK1-­‐0186  20C  11.1v  1800mah  Li-­‐Polymer  battery   Figure  19   Product Description Table  7   Item  NO.   EK1-­‐0186   Size   100*34*25mm   Weight(g)   47.0ï‫½؟‬ï ‫؟‬½5.0   (single  electric  core)   discharge  magnification   20C   compages  form   connection  in  series   charging  port   XH2.5-­‐4P  reversal     (equilibrium  charge)   Inner  resistance   20mï‫½؟‬ï‫  ½؟‬max     (single  electric  core)   discharging  cut-­‐off  voltage   2.75V     (single  electric  core)   charging  cut-­‐off  voltage   4.20ï‫½؟‬ï ‫؟‬½0.05 V     (single  electric  core)   long-­‐time  load  voltage     3.6V~4.1V     (single  electric  core)    
  39. 39.       39     Radio JR  Propo  DSX7  7-­‐Channel  2.4GHz  Computer  Radio  Control  System  (DSMJ),  Package  includes   Transmitter  2.4GHz  DSMJ,  RD731  7Ch  2.4G  DSMJ  Receiver  w/EA131  Remote  Receiver,  ES539   Standard  Servo  x3,  TX  8N  1500mah  Ni-­‐MH  battery,  Switch  and  220V  charger.  English  manual   included.  |  Mode  1,  Mode  2  inter-­‐changeable.    Figure  20     Product  Code  :  [DSX7  2.4G  DSMJ  w/ES539  [DSX7JES539]] Quality  product  from  JR  Propo.   JR  Propo  -­‐  2.4GHz  Spread  Spectrum  Technology  (DSMJ)   JR  Propo  DSX7  2.4GHz  Computer  Radio  Control  System  (DSMJ)  is  suitable  for  Beginner  to   Intermediate  flyers  and  also  the  only  model  for  even  the  advanced.  It  is  reliable  and  stable  with   2.4GHz  with  built-­‐in  system,  promising  an  exciting  flight  in  the  comfort  of  all  flyers.   It  comes  with  Transmitter  2.4GHz,  RD731  2.4GHz  DSMJ  7  Channel  Receiver  w/EA131  remote   receiver,  3pcs  x  ES539  standard  servos  for  electric  model  or  glow  model  use.   The  system  comes  with  Mode  1  which  can  be  changed  to  Mode  2  by  editing  system  software   with  stick  spring.   The  Flight  Mode  is  at  the  right  hand  side.  
  40. 40.       40       Content JR  Propo  DSX7  Transmitter  2.4GHz  DSMJ     RD731  7Ch  2.4GHz  DSMJ  Receiver  w/EA131  Remote  Receiver   JR04884  2.4GHz  Remote  wire  extension  (150mm/6")     JR  ES539  Standard  Analog  Servo  x  3pcs  (Servo  Horns  &  mounting  accessories  included)   TX  8N  1500mah  Ni-­‐MH  battery     NEC-­‐322  220V  Tx  &  Rx  charger   Bind  Plug  Set     Switch   2mm  Allen  Wrench   English  manual  included  |  Mode  1  or  Mode  2  inter-­‐changeable.     Spec -­‐Method:  DSMJ  /  Computer  Mixing   -­‐Number  of  Channels:  7ch   -­‐Transmitter  Weight:  640g  (excluding  battery)   -­‐Battery  fit:  8N1500   -­‐For  Helicopters  or  Airplane     Features Band:  2.4  GHz     Servos:  ES539  X  3     Receiver:  RD731  (DSMJ)   Transmitter  (Tx)  Battery  Type:  1500mah  Ni-­‐MH     AC:  220V     20-­‐model  memory     Airplane  and  Heli  software     Switch  assignment     P-­‐mixes    
  41. 41.       41     3-­‐axis  dual  rate  and  expo     3-­‐position  flap  (Airplane)     5-­‐point  throttle  &  pitch  curve  (Heli)     3  flight  modes  plus  hold  (Heli)     Gyro  programming  (Heli)     CCPM  swash  mixing  90/120/180  degree  (CCPM:  Cyclic  Collective  Pitch  Mixing  System)     English  manual     ES539 Standard Analog Servo Specification Torque:  4.8kg.cm  (66.67oz.in)   Speed:  0.23S/60°   Size:  32.5  x  19  x  38.5mm  (1.28x0.75x1.52in)   Weight:  38g  (1.34oz)  
  42. 42.       42     Airfoil Selection5 Airfoil  used  –  NACA  2414   As  this  airfoil  seems  to  be  the  most  suited  for  this  application  according  to  the  study  shown   below   Comparing  the  airfoils;    NACA  2412,  NACA2414,  NACA  2414   Naca-­‐2412   Thickness:   12.0%     Max  CL  angle:     15.0     Camber:   2.0%   Max  L/D:     50.702     Trailing  edge   angle:   14.5o   Max  L/D  angle:     5.5     Lower  flatness:   45.2%   Max  L/D  CL:     0.927     Leading  edge   radius:   1.7%   Stall  angle:     7.0     Max  CL:   1.204   Zero-­‐lift  angle:    -­‐2.0                                                                                                                               5. 5  http://www.worldofkrauss.com/foils   Figure  21  
  43. 43.       43       Figure  22   NACA  2414     Figure  23   Thickness:   14.0%     Camber:   2.0%   Trailing  edge   angle:   17.8o   Lower  flatness:   50.5%   Leading  edge   radius:   3.0%         Max  CL:   1.245   Max  CL  angle:   10.5   Max  L/D:   41.542   Max  L/D  angle:  6.0   Max  L/D  CL:   0.943   Stall  angle:   10.5   Zero-­‐lift  angle:   -­‐2.0                    
  44. 44.       44                                                           NACA  2415      Figure  25           Thickness:   15.0%     Camber:   2.0%   Trailing  edge  angle:   19.1o   Lower  flatness:   43.6%   Leading  edge  radius:  3.3%   Max  CL:   1.281   Max  CL  angle:   11.5   Max  L/D:   40.672   Max  L/D  angle:  6.5   Max  L/D  CL:   0.991   Stall  angle:   11.5   Zero-­‐lift  angle:   -­‐2.0  
  45. 45.       45       Figure  26       From  the  above  figures  NACA  2414  is  the  most  suitable.   NACA  2414  is  selected  since  it  has  good  enough  thickness  to  accommodate  1  cm  rod  for  the   engine  tilting  mechanism.      
  46. 46.       46     Ribs  shapes  generated  with  the  help  of  the  software  "profili"     Figure  27  
  47. 47.       47     AIRCRAFT DESIGN The  2-­‐D  drawing  that  guided  through  the  dimensions  and  construction  process  showing  the  3-­‐ isometric  views  of  the  aircraft.     Top view   Figure  28    
  48. 48.       48     Side view   Figure  29       Front view   Figure  30  
  49. 49.       49     Structure designing :(PROFILI) Wing  structure  with  ribs  placements  designed  with  the  help  of  Profilli   Figure  31      
  50. 50.       50     Figure  32       Figure  33      
  51. 51.       51     Rib structure Design on AutoCAD   Wing with ribs placement      
  52. 52.       52     Fuselage ribs and wing ribs placement       Spars supporting the ribs   Total structure of the wing Fuselage  ribs  for  support  of  the  structure  
  53. 53.       53      
  54. 54.       54     3D Drawing Side view   Figure  34     Bottom view   Figure  35    
  55. 55.       55     Top view   Figure  36    
  56. 56.       56     Circuits Tilt  rotor  circuit   Figure  37                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Figure  38     Tilt  rotor  mechanism   Figure  39                                                                                                                                                                                                              Figure  40        
  57. 57.       57     Servo  circuit     Figure  41    
  58. 58.       58     CONSTRUCTION (ASSEMBLY)   Figure  42   The  Design(plan)  gave  us  a  green  signal  to  finally  start  with  the  construction  of  the  aircraft.  The   component  parts  that  were  needed  to  form  an  assembled  aircraft  were  each  traced  and  draw   on  the  balsa  wood  with  the  respective  dimensions  using  the  carbon  paper.  These  designs  of  the   parts  were  traced  with  the  help  of  a  transparent  paper.    
  59. 59.       59       Figure  43     And  then  all  the  shapes  were  cut  with  the  help  of  a  normal  metal  cutter,  and  then  placed   separately.     Figure  44    
  60. 60.       60     Starting  with  the  wing,  which  had  the  following  units:   • 8  airfoil  shaped  ribs  each  wing.   • 3  spars   • Tilt  rotor  holder  ribs                                                                          Figure  45                                                                                                                                                                                                    Figure  46       Figure  47        
  61. 61.       61       Holes    made  with  the  help  of  a  small  drilling  machine  done  by  a  professional.  Holes  made  for  the   space  provision  of  the  spars  going  through  the  airfoil  parts.       Figure  48   Wing  placed  according  to  the  design  with  the  spars  going  through  them  making  the  entire  inner   structure  of  the  wing.  
  62. 62.       62     Fuselage     Figure  49   The  Fuselage  ribs  cut  accordingly  and  shaped  as  per  the  design.   Figure  50                                                                        Figure  51                                                                                                                                                                                                          Figure  52    
  63. 63.       63         Figure  53   Spaces  at  the  sides  of  the  fuselage  ribs  provided  for  placement  of  the  support  balsa  sticks   making  the  fuselage  structure  rigid.         Figure  54   The  fuselage  ribs  placed  accordingly  at  correct  distances  as  per  the  design.   Long  balsa  sticks  glued  to  the  spaces  provided  at  the  sides  of  the  fuselage  ribs.  
  64. 64.       64       Figure  55     Figure  56   The  center  part  of  the  wing  where  it  is  placed  on  top  of  the  fuselage  structure,  is  constructed   accordingly  for  the  holding  of  the  tilt  rotor  mechanism  parts.  
  65. 65.       65       Figure  57   Ply  wood  used  for  the  support  of  the  wing  structure  against  the  fuselage  to  give  the  area  a   better  rigidness  and  support,  and  a  free  movement  in  direction  for  the  wing.     Figure  58   Landing  gear  support  is  constructed  at  the  lower  part  of  the  fuselage  on  the  either  sides,  so  as  to   give  the  landing  gear  a  space  away  from  the  main  fuselage  structure.  
  66. 66.       66     Engine Mount   Figure  59   The  engines  placed  on  the  either  sides  of  the  wing  must  be  supported  very  strong  as  high  stress   is  faced  in  this  area  due  to  maximum  throttle  of  the  motor.   This  area  is  mounted  with  balsa  and  ply  wood  together  giving  it  a  very  good  hold  preventing   from  breaking  due  to  stress.     Figure  60    
  67. 67.       67     Tail wing   Figure  61   The  tail-­‐wing  includes  the  horizontal  stabilizer  ,  the  rudder  and  the  tail  motor  mount.       Figure  62   Parts  of  the  tail  wing  placed  and  fixed  accordingly  forming  the  internal  structure  of  the   horizontal  stabilizer  and  the  rudder.  
  68. 68.       68       Figure  63   The  total  internal  structure  is  constructed.   Figure  64                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Figure  65    
  69. 69.       69     Tilt-Rotor mechanism structure   The  tilt  rotor  section,  constructed  accordingly  with  the  provision  of  the  spar  going  through  the   whole  wing  and  the  strong  support  for  the  tilt  rotor  mechanism  structures.                                            Figure  66                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Figure  67                                                          Figure  68                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Figure  69        
  70. 70.       70       Figure  70   Wing  at  the  tilt  position  for  the  hovering  part  of  flight       Electricals  and  servos  fixed  at  the  appropriate  locations     Figure  71                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Figure  72      
  71. 71.       71     Tail-­‐motor  fixed  with  the  mount  supporting  it  and  giving  the  propeller  blades  a  clearance   distance  from  the  tail  wing.                                                                                                                    Figure  73                                                                                                    Figure  74                                                                                                                                                                                                        Figure  75     Landing  gear  attached,  one  on  either  sides  and  one  at  the  tail-­‐part  of  the  fuselage                                                                                                                                                                                                                Figure  76    
  72. 72.       72       Battery  holder  is  made  by  creating  a  space  exactly  measured  for  the  battery  to  fit  it.     Figure  77   Motors  fixed  to  the  mounts  on  the  either  side  of  the  wings.                Figure  78      
  73. 73.       73       Tilt-­‐Rotor  Aircraft  sheeting,  shaped  and  painted.     Figure  79   Aero-­‐chopper  presented  with  the  Tilt-­‐rotor  function.       Figure  80    
  74. 74.       74     GRAPHS6 The  graphs  that  we  are  going  to  use  are  the  following   The  aerodynamic  form  factor  graph                                                                                                                                            Figure  81                                                                                                                             6. 6  Fundamentals  of  Flight  by  Richard  S  Shovel    
  75. 75.       75       Figure  82         Figure  83 7                                                                                                                                  
  76. 76.       76       Figure  84     Figure  85  
  77. 77.       77     Table  8      
  78. 78.       78     Area Calculation CALCULATIONS: Wing     Drawing  1     Drawing  2   Rectangle   Area    =    l  x  b                      =    35  x  18    =    648cm2   RIGHT  +  LEFT      =    648  +  648    =    1296cm2    
  79. 79.       79       Drawing  3   Rectangle   Area    =    l  x  b                      =    13.5  x  9.1    =    122.85cm2       Total  wing  area(TOP)      =    Left  section  +  Right  section  +  Center  section                                                                                =    648    +    648    +    122.85                                                                              =    1418.85cm2   Total  wing  area(BOTTOM)  =        Total  wing  area(TOP)     Total  Wing  Area(TOP  and  BOTTOM)    =    TOP    +    BOTTOM                                                                                                                            =    1418.85cm2      +      1418.85cm2                                                                                                                            =    2837.7cm2   Airfoil shaped side section of wing With  the  help  of  AutoCAD  the  exact  area  of  the  side  section  of  the  wing  could  be  taken  by   calculating  the  area  of  the  airfoil.  
  80. 80.       80       Drawing  5     Area        =            4.1455inch2      =      26.745cm2   2  sides      =      26.745cm2    x  2    =    53.49cm2   Area  of  the  sides  view  of  the  wing    =    53.49cm2     Total  surface  Area  of  the  Wing      =    Side-­‐view  Area    +    Top  &  Bottom  view  Area                                                                                                        =      53.49cm2      +      2837.7cm2                                                                                                        =    2891.19cm2     Total  Surface  Area  of  the  Wing(MAIN)    =    2891.19cm2     Drawing  4  
  81. 81.       81     Horizontal Stabilizer   Drawing  6   Rectangle   Area        =    l  x  b    =  7.5    x    12.2    =    91.5cm2   Triangle   Area      =    1/2  b  h    =    1/2    x  4.5  x  12.2    =    27.45cm2   Total    =    Rectangle  +  Triangle    =    27.45  +  91.5    =    118.95cm2   2  sides    =    118.95    +    118.95      =    237.9cm2    
  82. 82.       82     Vertical Stabilizer   Drawing  7   Rectangle   Area    =    l  x  b      =  52  x  10  =  520cm2     Top  and  bottom  =    520    x    2  =  1040cm2   Total  Area      =    1040cm2     Engine Mount   Drawing  8   l        =    11.7cm  
  83. 83.       83     w    =    5.1cm   h    =    5.1cm   Area  of  cuboid    =    2  (  lw  +  wh  +  hl  )                                                    =    2  (  11.7x5.1    +    5.1x5.1    +    5.1x11.6    )                                                    =    2  (145.35)  =  290.7cm2   Total  Area  of  Engine  Mount(2  sides)    =    290.7cm2    x    2    =    581.14cm2   Engine Mount(TAIL) Drawing  9     l      =    11.5cm    ,    w    =    3.8cm    ,      h    =    2cm   Area  of  cuboid    =    2  (  lw  +  wh  +  hl  )                                                      =    2    (  11.5x3.8    +    3.8x2    +    11.5x2  )                                                      =    2(  74.3  )  =    148.6cm2   Total  Area  of  Engine  Mount(TAIL)    148.6cm2    
  84. 84.       84     Fins   Drawing  10   Triangle   Area      =    1/2  b  h    =  1/2  x  4.9  x  6.8    =    1/2  x  33.32      =    16.66cm2   Rectangle(R1)   Area      =    l  x  b    =  6.8    x    5      =  34cm2   Rectangle(R2)   Area        =    l    x  b  =  9.9    x    2    =19.8cm2   Total  Area(one  side-­‐one  fin)=Triangle  +  R1  +  R2  =  16.66  +  34  +  19.8  =  70.46cm2      2  Sides      =    70.46    x    2    =    140.92cm2   ;    2  Fins    =    140.92    x    2    =    281.84cm2   Total  Area  of  the  fins      =    281.84cm2  
  85. 85.       85     Landing Gear Hold   Drawing  11   Airfoil  area    -­‐    2.7910cm2    =  Side  surface   53.49      -­‐    2.7910      =    50.699   Area      =    50.699cm2     Forward section   Drawing  12   Area      =    l  x  b    =  7.5    x    2    =    15cm2    
  86. 86.       86     Top and Bottom surface   Drawing  13   Area      =    l    x    b    =    7.5    x  16  =  120cm2     Top  and  bottom  =  120  x  2    =  240cm2     Total  Landing  gear  hold  Area    =    Side    +    Forward    +  Top  and  Bottom                                                                                                  =    50.699    +    240    +15                                                                                                  =    305.699cm2    
  87. 87.       87     Area of Fuselage     Drawing  14   Area  of  the  fuselage  side  section                                                  =        Area  A    +  Area  B  +Area  C  +  Area  D  +  Area  E  +  Area  F   Area  A   (Trapezium)     Drawing  15   Area  of  Trapezium      =      (a  +  b)/2    x  h                                                                    =    (5  +  6.3)/2      x    2.9      =      16.385cm2      
  88. 88.       88     Area  B     Drawing  16   Area  of  Trapezium      =      (a  +  b)/2    x  h                                                          =      (6.3    +    8.5)/2    x    4  =  29.6cm2   Area  C     Drawing  17   Rectangle   Area  =    l  x  b    =    56.95cm2   Triangle   Area      =    1/2  x  b  x  h  =  1/2    x    4.6    x  6.7      =    15.41cm2   Total  Area    =    56.95    +  15.41    =    72.36cm2  
  89. 89.       89     D     Drawing  19   Can  be  assumed  as:   Area      =    l    x    b    =    13.4    x    16.5    =     221.1cm2   E     Drawing  20     Drawing  18  
  90. 90.       90     Rectangle   Area      =    l    x    b  =  7.8    x    23.2    =    180.96cm2   Triangle   Area      =    1/2    x    b    x    h    =    1/2    x    5.9    x  23.2    =    249.4cm2   F     Drawing  21   Area    =    1/2    x    b  x  h    =    1/2  x    7.8  x    24.3  =    94.77cm2     Total  Area  of  Fuselage  Side  section    =  A  +  B  +  C  +  D  +  E  +  F                      =    16.385  29.6  +  72.36  +  221.1  +  249.4  +  94.77    =    683.615cm2   Both  sides      =    683.615    +    683.615                                        =    1,367.23cm2  
  91. 91.       91     Fuselage(TOP AND BOTTOM)   Drawing  22      
  92. 92.       92     A'     Drawing  23   Area  of  trapezium                                    =    (  a  +  b  )/2    x    h    =    (  6.2  +  12.1  )/2    x    6                                    =    225.06cm2   B'     Drawing  24   Area  of  Trapezium                                      =    (  a  +  b  )/2    x    h    =    (  12.1    +    13  )  /  2      x  7.6                                      =    95.38cm2  
  93. 93.       93     C'     Drawing  25   Area      =    l    x    b    =    13    x  10                      =      130cm2     D'     Drawing  26   Area    =    l    x  b      =    8.2    x    5.5        =    45.1cm2      
  94. 94.       94     E'     Drawing  27   Area    =      l    x    b    =    13    x  29.4      =    382.2cm2   F'     Drawing  28   Area    =      1/2    x  b  x  h                      =    1/2    x    13    x    24    =    156cm2      
  95. 95.       95     Total Area of Fuselage(TOP) Area  A'  +  B'  +  C'  +  D'  +  E'  +    F'    =    Total  Area   225.06  95.38  +  130  +  45.1  +  382.2  +  156    =    1,033.74cm2     TOP  and  BOTTOM    =    1033.74    x    2      2067.48cm2     Front  surface     Drawing  29   Area    =      l    x    b      =  6.2    x    5    =    31cm2     Total  Area  of  Fuselage   SIDES      +      TOP/BOTTOM    +      FRONT                                                    =    1367.23    +    2067.48                                                    =    3465.71cm2   Total  Area  of  Fuselage                                                      =          3465.71cm2   Total  Area  of  Wing                                                                    =          2891.19cm2   Total  Area  of  Tailing                                                        =        1040cm2   Total  Area  of  Horizontal  Stabilizer                    =          237.9cm2  
  96. 96.       96     Total  Area  of  Fins                                                                        =        281.84cm2   Total  Area  of  Engine  Mounts(MAIN)                =        581.14cm2   Total  Area  of  Engine  mount(TAIL)                        =      148.6cm2   Total  Area  of  Landing  Gear  Hold                            =        305.699cm2     TOTAL SURFACE AREA OF THE AIRCRAFT = Fuselage  +  Wing  +  Tailing  +  Horizontal  Stabilizer  +  Fins  +  Engine  Mounts(MAIN)  +  Engine   mount(TAIL)  +  Landing  Gear  Hold   =  3465.71cm2  +  2891.19cm2  +  1040cm2  +  237.9cm2  +  281.84cm2  +  581.14cm2  +  148.6cm2  +   305.699cm2     Total  Surface  Area  of  the  Aircraft    =    8952.079cm2  
  97. 97.       97     PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS LIFT Airfoil  used  is  NACA  2414   The  software  profili  gives  us  the  following  values;     CLmax            =        1.379  at  15o  AOA   CL                      =        0.752  at  4o  AOA   During cruise Considering  the  angle  of  attack  of  wing,  during  cruising  will  be  40 .   We  know  that  L  =  W  during  cruise.   L  =    2    KG     L  =        20  N   Ρ(density)  at  sea  level            =              1.225  kg/  m3   S(wing  area)                                          =        0.05898m2   L  =  1/2  P  CL  V2  S                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Eq  (1)   V2    =    2L  /  ρ  CL  S    =    2  *  20  /  1.225  *  0.752  *  0.05898   V2    =      737.2    V    =          27.15m/s  
  98. 98.       98         During Landing The  Cl  is  at  max      =      1.379   V2      =    2L  /  ρ  CL  S    =      2  *  20  /  1.225  *  1.379  *  0.0589   V2      =    409.50   V        =              20.2  m/s      
  99. 99.       99     Vstall  is  the  lowest  speed  at  which  steady  controllable  flight  can  be  maintained  any  further   increase  in  AOA  will  cause  flow  separation  on  the  wing  upper  surface,  a  drop  in  lift,  a  large   increase  in  drag.  In  a  well-­‐designed  airplane,  a  strong  pitch-­‐down  moment  is  experienced.   Vstall    =    Vat  landing   Vstall      =    20.2  m/s     LIFT  during  landing   L  =  1/2  P  CL  V2  S                                                                                                                                                                                        Eq  (1)        =      1/2  *1.225*  1.379*20.22  *  0.05898   L    =        20.2    N       During  take  off   Velocity  at  take-­‐off  is  20%  greater  than  Vstall.   VTO        =      20.2  +  20.2  x  0.20                      =                24.24  m/s  
  100. 100.       100     OR     Around  70%  of  CLMAX                              i.e.  0.70x1.379    =    0.966                              VTO 2      =    2L  /  ρ  CL  S    =      2  *  20  /  1.225  *  0.966  *  0.05898   i.e.        At  60  AOA                                        VTO          =            23.9    m/s     LIFT during Take-off LTO  =    1/2  P  CL  V2  S                                                                                                  Eq  (1)                      [since  CL  =  0.966                =          1/2  *1.225*  0.966*20.22  *  0.05898                                                                  and  VTO      =    21.8]   LTO  =              14.43N       DRAG The  total  Drag  of  the  Aircraft  is  calculated  by  summing  the  parasite  and  induced  drag  together.  
  101. 101.       101                                                                                      CD  =  CDP  +    CDi                                                                                    D  =  CDqS   Drag  is  calculated  for  three  phase  of  flight  i.e.  Take  off,  Cruise  and  landing.     At Take Off CDptotal    is  calculated  by  computing  CDp  for  wing,  fuselage  ,  horizontal  and  vertical  stabilizer   separately.   CDp  of  wing   ∑   𝐾𝐶fswet  /  Sref                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Eq  (4)   Sref            =      0.028912m3   Swet          =          0.05898  m3   Cr            =                  0.18  m   CT          =                    0.18  m   σ      =      CT    /    Cr    =    1   L    =    MAC                                                                                                                                                                                                              Eq  (5)            =      2/3  x    Cr    (1  +  σ    -­‐    σ/(1  +  σ)  )            =        2/3  *  0.18  (  1  +  1  -­‐    1/(1  +  1))    =      2/3  *0.18(2  -­‐  1/2)            =        0.18                                                                           L      =      0.18        
  102. 102.       102                     V      =        1.4607 * 10-5           RN      =      V0    x  L/v                                                                                                                                                                                          Eq  (6)                    =    24.24    *    0.18  /    1.4607  *  10-­‐5   RN        =    298,706.0998                                Since  RN  >  200,000   The  flow  is  turbulent   Cf  for  turbulent   Cf        =        0.455  /  [(log10RN)2.58      =              0.455  /  [log10298,706.0998)  2.58                                                                                                              =              5.6  x  10-­‐3                                                                                                              Eq  (7)  

×