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WSSD-U-2016 Sept 15 Resilency Panel

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15 Thursday morning panel: Partners in Resilience- Higher education's role in metro-Boston climate adaptation planning

Publié dans : Environnement
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WSSD-U-2016 Sept 15 Resilency Panel

  1. 1. Moderator: Amy Longsworth, Director, Boston Green Ribbon Commission Panelists: Dennis Carlberg, Sustainability Director, Boston University Kerry Emanuel, Cecil and Ida Green Prof of Atmospheric Science, Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric & Planetary Sciences, MIT Paul Kirshen, Professor, School for Environment; Academic Director, Sustainable Solutions Lab, U-Mass Boston Robert Manning, Director, Engineering & Utilities, Harvard University Keynote Panel 9:15-10:30 Partners in resilience – Higher education’s role in metro-Boston climate adaptation planning WSSD-U-2016
  2. 2. 5 mins Designing Tomorrow’s Campus: Resiliency, Vulnerability & Adaptation September 15, 2016
  3. 3. Approach  Mitigation  Preparation Issues  Living Learning Lab  Tools  Climate Ready BU  Collaboration
  4. 4. AMERICAN CAMPUSES ACT ON CLIMATE PLEDGE Living-Learning Labs  To use the region, city of Boston, and Boston University as living-learning laboratories where our community, facilities, and urban fabric become the object of inquiry to advance solutions for mitigation and adaptation. BU – N. Phillips
  5. 5. INTEGRATION Initiative  Research  Education  Communications  Science
  6. 6. REMOTE SENSING & GEOSPATIAL SCIENCES Team GIS Grad Students Address  GIS Grad Students  sustainability@BU  EH&S  Emergency Planning Suchi Gopal
  7. 7. CLIMATE READY BU Purpose Inform Decision Makers  Plan  Prepare  Allocate Resources Address  Sea Level Rise  Heat  Storm Intensity 2015 2016 20172013 2014 Climate Ready Boston Jun 16 Sep 16 Suchi Gopal Kickoff Meeting Dec 13 Issue Report Jun 15 Faculty Review Nov 14 Climate Ready Boston Feb 13
  8. 8. CLIMATE READY BU Sea Level Rise  GIS Modeling  5 Feet (1.5m)  Area of First Concern sustainability@BU
  9. 9. CLIMATE READY BU Recommendatio ns  5 Time Horizons  New Construction  Renovations  Planning sustainability@BU
  10. 10. COLLABORATION Players  Green Ribbon Commission  Metro Mayors  Urban Land Institute  Trust for Public Land  Metropolitan Area Planning Council  A Better City Steve Lipofsky
  11. 11. Thank you sustainability@bu.edu
  12. 12. Assessing MIT’s Flood Risk: Present and Future Kerry Emanuel Lorenz Center, MIT
  13. 13. The Problem • The top of the Charles River Dam is only 1.8 feet above normal high tide • Sea level rise coupled with heavier rainfalls could greatly increase flooding risk in the Charles River Basin. • We think that heavy rains from a tropical cyclone coupled with a modest storm surge in Boston Harbor poses a significant threat to lower Cambridge and Back Bay Boston • MIT has significant assets located underground (e.g. parts of the new “MIT.nano” building, the control room of the fission reactor)
  14. 14. Our Approach • Generate 5000 synthetic tropical cyclones passing within 150 km of Boston, downscaled from 5 climate models for both late 20th century and late 21st century simulations under a realistic emissions scenario • Use the modeled winds to drive hydrodynamic storm surge models and modeled rain to drive river and storm sewer flow models • Use these to assess the evolution of MIT’s flooding risk over the next 100 years
  15. 15. Some Early Results
  16. 16. Hurricanes Passing within 150 km of Boston Downscaled from 5 climate models
  17. 17. Surge Risk with 1 meter sea level rise
  18. 18. Rain Risk
  19. 19. Paul Kirshen Professor, School for Environment; Academic Director, Sustainable Solutions Lab, U-Mass Boston
  20. 20. Harvard University District Energy and Partnering in Resilience Robert Manning Director of Engineering & Utilities Harvard University Campus Services September 15, 2016
  21. 21. • Boston Green Ribbon Commission o Higher Education Working Group o Carbon Free Boston Working Group • Cambridge Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment • Cambridge Compact For A Sustainable Future Ongoing Cooperative Efforts 22 See: green.harvard.edu • Harvard University Climate Preparedness Working Group • Internal Operations and Design Review • Project Planning
  22. 22. • Produce, procure and distribute energy throughout Cambridge and Allston • Steam Plant with CHP, two interconnected chilled water plants and microgrid • Fuel input: 1.2 million MMBTUs • Electric consumed: 236 million kWH • Central cooling: 1,057,000 ton-days Harvard District Energy Systems 23
  23. 23. Harvard Microgrid 24 • Multiple district switching stations, separate upstream supplies, all distribution is underground, interconnection capability • Two line source selectivity design for each building, restore then repair • Up to 12.5 MW co-gen, duel fuel with ability to island, and blackstart if necessary • Very reliable in severe weather events
  24. 24. Harvard Microgrid 25 • Flexibility to integrate behind the meter (cogeneration, wind, solar) • Aggregation of load allows for net benefit, manage peaks, demand response • Growth / expansion support, temporary power, relocations, etc Main Campus kW - Demand Response Event 20,000 25,000 30,000 35,000 40,000 45,000 0:00 0:45 1:30 2:15 3:00 3:45 4:30 5:15 6:00 6:45 7:30 8:15 9:00 9:45 10:30 11:15 12:00 12:45 13:30 14:15 15:00 15:45 16:30 17:15 18:00 18:45 19:30 20:15 21:00 21:45 22:30 23:15 7/21/2011 6/21/2012
  25. 25. • District mechanical and electrical spaces that will house energy production and distribution equipment and support heating, cooling and electric needs of the SEC and future buildings • DEF will be resilient to projected storm-surge / climate change flooding impacts, raised several feet above grade with no basement. • Hot water system instead of steam, low temperature supply • Planned cogeneration and backup power supply • Thermal storage • Flexibility for growth and future technology 26 New Allston District Energy Facility (DEF)

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