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Management Science Models and Techniques
Module 5
Decision Making
 In actual practice, however, many decision-making situations
occur under conditions of uncertainty
 Exa...
Categories of Decision Making
The two categories of decision situations are:
Probabilities that can be assigned to futur...
Components of Decision Making
A decision-making situation includes several components
The decisions themselves and the a...
The Payoff Table
 A payoff table is a means of organizing and illustrating the payoffs
from the different decisions, give...
Illustration – Payoff Table
 For example, if decision 1 is to purchase a computer and state of
nature a is good economic ...
Decision Making Without Probabilities
 Let’s consider development of a payoff table without
probabilities
 An investor i...
Illustration
 Let’s consider development of a payoff table without
probabilities
Decision Making Criteria
 Once the decision situation has been organized into a payoff
table, several criteria are availa...
The Maximax Criterion
 The decision maker selects the decision that will result in the
maximum of the maximum payoffs
The Maximin Criterion
 With the maximin criterion, the decision maker selects the
decision that will reflect the maximum ...
The Minimax Regret Criterion
 Suppose the investor decided to purchase the warehouse
 Finds out that economic conditions...
The Hurwicz Criterion
 The Hurwicz criterion strikes a compromise between the maximax
and maximin criteria
 The principl...
Coefficient of Optimism
 The coefficient of optimism ‘alpha’, is between zero and one
 If then the decision maker is sai...
The Equal Likelihood Criterion
 The equal likelihood, or LaPlace, criterion weights each state of
nature equally, thus as...
Summary
 The decision to purchase the apartment building was designated most often by
the various decision criteria. Noti...
Conclusion
 Decision Making Components
 Payoff Table
 Decision Making Without Probabilities
 Various Decision Making C...
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Decision making without probabilities: View the full course at https://www.udemy.com/management-science-techniques

Get greater insight into Management Science Techniques and Models by applying various techniques to solve common business problems that project managers face every day.

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Decision Making Without Probabilities

  1. 1. Management Science Models and Techniques Module 5
  2. 2. Decision Making  In actual practice, however, many decision-making situations occur under conditions of uncertainty  Example:  The demand for a product may be not 100 units next week, but 50 or 200 units, depending on the state of the market (which is uncertain)  Several decision-making techniques are available to aid the decision maker in dealing with this type of decision situation in which there is uncertainty
  3. 3. Categories of Decision Making The two categories of decision situations are: Probabilities that can be assigned to future occurrences Probabilities that cannot be assigned
  4. 4. Components of Decision Making A decision-making situation includes several components The decisions themselves and the actual events that may occur in the future, known as states of nature Suppose a distribution company is considering purchasing a computer to increase the number of orders it can process and thus increase its business. If economic conditions remain good, the company will realize a large increase in profit; however, if the economy takes a downturn, the company will lose money. In this decision situation, the possible decisions are to purchase the computer and to not purchase the computer. The states of nature are good economic conditions and bad economic conditions
  5. 5. The Payoff Table  A payoff table is a means of organizing and illustrating the payoffs from the different decisions, given the various states of nature in a decision problem  Each decision, 1 or 2, will result in an outcome, or payoff, for the particular state of nature that will occur in the future. Payoffs are typically expressed in terms of profit revenues, or cost (although they can be expressed in terms of a variety of values)
  6. 6. Illustration – Payoff Table  For example, if decision 1 is to purchase a computer and state of nature a is good economic conditions, payoff 1a could be $100,000 in profit
  7. 7. Decision Making Without Probabilities  Let’s consider development of a payoff table without probabilities  An investor is to purchase one of three types of real estate  The investor must decide among an apartment building, an office building, and a warehouse  The future states of nature that will determine how much profit the investor will make are good economic conditions and poor economic conditions
  8. 8. Illustration  Let’s consider development of a payoff table without probabilities
  9. 9. Decision Making Criteria  Once the decision situation has been organized into a payoff table, several criteria are available for making the actual decision  Maximax  Maximin  Minimax regret  Hurwicz  Equal likelihood
  10. 10. The Maximax Criterion  The decision maker selects the decision that will result in the maximum of the maximum payoffs
  11. 11. The Maximin Criterion  With the maximin criterion, the decision maker selects the decision that will reflect the maximum of the minimum payoffs
  12. 12. The Minimax Regret Criterion  Suppose the investor decided to purchase the warehouse  Finds out that economic conditions in the future were better than expected. Naturally, the investor would be disappointed that she had not purchased the office building because it would have resulted in the largest payoff ($100,000) under good economic conditions. In fact, the investor would regret the decision to purchase the warehouse, and the degree of regret would be $70,000, the difference between the payoff for the investor’s choice and the best choice  Selecting maximum payoff
  13. 13. The Hurwicz Criterion  The Hurwicz criterion strikes a compromise between the maximax and maximin criteria  The principle underlying this decision criterion is that the decision maker is neither totally optimistic (as the maximax criterion assumes) nor totally pessimistic (as the maximin criterion assumes)  With the Hurwicz criterion, the decision payoffs are weighted by a coefficient of optimism, a measure of the decision maker’s optimism
  14. 14. Coefficient of Optimism  The coefficient of optimism ‘alpha’, is between zero and one  If then the decision maker is said to be completely optimistic; if then the decision maker is completely pessimistic  The Hurwicz criterion requires that for each decision alternative, the maximum payoff be multiplied by and the minimum payoff be multiplied. For our investment example, if equals .4 (i.e., the investor is slightly pessimistic), if it’s 0.6, then values will result in:  Buy apartment building
  15. 15. The Equal Likelihood Criterion  The equal likelihood, or LaPlace, criterion weights each state of nature equally, thus assuming that the states of nature are equally likely to occur  Alpha value 0.5
  16. 16. Summary  The decision to purchase the apartment building was designated most often by the various decision criteria. Notice that the decision to purchase the warehouse was never indicated by any criterion. This is because the payoffs for an apartment building, under either set of future economic conditions, are always better than the payoffs for a warehouse. Thus, given any situation with these two alternatives (and any other choice, such as purchasing the office building), the decision to purchase an apartment building will always be made over the decision to purchase a warehouse
  17. 17. Conclusion  Decision Making Components  Payoff Table  Decision Making Without Probabilities  Various Decision Making Criteria

Decision making without probabilities: View the full course at https://www.udemy.com/management-science-techniques Get greater insight into Management Science Techniques and Models by applying various techniques to solve common business problems that project managers face every day.

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