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Dr mary e. collins gradireland presentation

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Dr mary e. collins gradireland presentation

  1. 1. Dr. Mary E Collins – RCSI Institute of Leadership October 30 2014 Changing Landscape of the Workplace……
  2. 2. Page 2 War for Talent is back…..
  3. 3. Changing Psychological Contract “the perception of mutual obligations and expectations to each other held by the two parties in an employment relationship” (Herriot & Manning, 1997). Transactional Relational The Deloitte Approach3
  4. 4. The Deloitte Approach4 Job Hopping Is the 'New Normal' for Millennials! Expected to move 15 to 20 times in their careers (Future Workplace: Multiple Generations at Work Survey)
  5. 5. Page 5 Employee Engagement Focus Kahn (1990) believed that the level of engagement was determined by each employee’s answer to three questions: How meaningful is it for me to bring myself to this work? How safe is it for me to do so? How available am I to do so?
  6. 6. Page 6 Current Engagement Levels ( Gallup 2014) % Engaged - ? % Disengaged - ? % Actively Disengaged- ?
  7. 7. Page 7 Disengagement – what price?  The most engaged employees are 87% less likely to leave their organisation  Engaged employees are on average 20% more productive  Price of Presenteeism is estimated to be 8 to12 times the cost of absenteeism Corporate Leadership Council (UK 2012)
  8. 8. Page 8 Mind The Gap Workplace Generational Cohorts: Individuals who share common events and experiences when they are born within the same historical period and the same socio-cultural context…. an inborn way of experiencing life and the world…’ Ng et al (2012)
  9. 9. Page 9 Baby Boomers – 1945 - 1961
  10. 10. Page 10 Baby Boomers – 1945 - 1961  Largest generation in history - 35% of workforce  Influences: post-war optimism and large families - children seen but not heard  Values: hard work, loyalty, rewards  Status and job titles matter  Time-served – promotion by tenure  Currently comprise 87% of all CEOs and senior management
  11. 11. Page 11 Generation X – 1962-1979
  12. 12. Page 12 Generation X – 1962-1977  Influences: Powerful leadership, ‘Yuppies’ ‘loadsamoney’,  Values: confident and independent, materialistic,  Long hours culture  High achievers  Cynical  Digital Immigrants Q uickTim e™ and a decom pr essor ar e needed t o see t his pict ur e.
  13. 13. Page 13
  14. 14. Page 14 Generation Y - defining moments Martin (2005) defines ‘Generation Y’ as employees born between 1978 and 1998. She describes them as ‘independent, entrepreneurial thinkers, who relish responsibility, thrive on challenge, love freedom and hate micromanagement’.  9/11 attacks Emerging economies Globalisation Social responsibility Digital natives Global warming
  15. 15. Page 15 Millennials will comprise 75% of the global workforce by 2025 They want to work for organisations that:  foster innovative thinking  develop their skills  nuture leadership skills  make a positive contribution to society. ‘Big Demands and High Expectations’ Deloitte Millenial Report 2014 What do Young Professionals Want?
  16. 16. Page 16 Harvard Study 2013 – 15,000 Millennials
  17. 17. Page 17
  18. 18. - 18 - Location/Filename/Unit/Author/Assistant(Use'View-HeaderandFooter'tochange) Engagement Drivers Values & Vision Opportunity & Challenge Timely, Honest Communication Attentive Management Interest in Personal Career Path Meaning & Purpose Terms and Conditions Energy Management MOTIVATE : A Framework for Engaging Professional Service Generation Y Employees © Mary E Collins 2010
  19. 19. Page 19
  20. 20. Page 20 Mind the Generational Gap….. Source: Lynne C. Lancaster and David Stillman. When Generations Collide: Who They Are. Why They Clash. How To Solve the Generational Puzzle at Work (HarperBusiness, 2002)
  21. 21. Page 21 Best practice for managing an intergenerational workforce: 1. Become educated about generational issues. Understand all of the generations in your workforce. Acquaint yourself with the issues that each generation faces, both at work and at home. 2. Avoid age stereotypes. Don’t judge people or pigeonhole them because of their age; some 65-year- olds are technology experts and some 25-year-olds have much to teach their older colleagues. 3. Manage to the unique strengths and needs of each generation. Consider each person’s situation and offer support around that. Gen Xers, for example, may represent a large percentage of your managers, but they are also likely to be raising young children, which may affect how flexible they can be with their time and location. 4. Support learning and career development across all age groups. Promote learning and development by “jumping the generations” to ensure that mentors and mentees are not in direct competition. This encourages “bi-directional” coaching, which is a good way to help employees build positive working relationships with each other. 5. Build a strong multigenerational work group. Be inclusive of perspectives and points of view, and make an effort to work inclusively and collaboratively. Create an atmosphere in which everyone feels they have the opportunity to contribute, lead and speak
  22. 22. Thanks for Listening! Q&A

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