Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.

Objects At Heights Webinar

225 vues

Publié le

Working safely to stop raining wrenches on your co-workers, in conjunction with Ergodyne.

For more free educational webinars and videos, please visit: https://www.tenaquip.com/shop/webinar-archive.jsp

Publié dans : Formation
  • Soyez le premier à commenter

  • Soyez le premier à aimer ceci

Objects At Heights Webinar

  1. 1. Objects At Heights Working  Safely  to  Stop  Raining   Wrenches  on  Your  Co-­‐Workers  
  2. 2. Agenda •  Introduc;on   •  Safety  at  Heights  Overview   •  Risk  Awareness     •  Costs   •  Controls  and  Best  Prac;ce     •  Summary  
  3. 3. SAFETY AT HEIGHTS OVERVIEW
  4. 4. Safety At Heights Hierarchy Safety  at   Heights   Workers   at  Heights   Objects   at  Heights   Fall     Protec8on     Solu8ons   Other  PPE   Solu8ons   Access   Solu8ons   Dropped   Objects   Solu8ons   Housekeeping     Solu8ons   Equipment   Transport   Solu8ons  
  5. 5. Workers   at  Heights   Fall     Protec8on     Solu8ons   Other  PPE   Solu8ons   Access   Solu8ons   Connectors   Head     &  Eye   Protec8on   Hand   Protec8on   Temperature   Control   LiFs   Ladders   Rope   Access   Passive   Systems   Ac8ve   Systems:   ABC’s  
  6. 6. Objects   at  Heights   Dropped   Objects   Solu8ons   Housekeeping   Solu8ons   Equipment   Transport   Solu8ons   Passive   Systems   Ac8ve   Systems:   3T’s   Tool  Org.  Cord  Org.   Gear  Org.   Hois8ng   Carrying  
  7. 7. AWARENESS IS KEY
  8. 8. Risk Awareness •  Defining  Dropped  Objects   –  Any  object/item  that  falls  from  its  previous  posi;on   –  Typically  considers  workers  {themselves}  as  separate   category  (fall  protec;on)   –  Can  be  large  or  small:   •  Tools   •  PPE   •  Equipment   •  Structure   •  Other  loose  items   DROPPED OBJECTS
  9. 9. Risk Awareness •  Sta;c  Dropped  Objects   –  Any  object  that  falls  from  a   sta;onary  posi;on  under  its   own  weight     •  Dynamic  Dropped  Objects   –  Any  object  that  falls  as     a  result  of  a  secondary  force   such  as  being     struck  by  another  object     or  involved  in  a  collision     DROPPED OBJECTS
  10. 10. Risk Awareness •  Dropped  Object  Causes   –  Elements:   •  Environmental  (wind,  rain,  snow,  sea  mo;on)   •  Corrosion  or  other  deteriora;on     •  Vibra;on     •  Body  effects  (sweaty  or  numb  hands,  fa;gue)     –  Worker  or  Equipment  Generated:   •  Tripping  or  colliding   •  Poor  housekeeping   •  Not  following  procedures   •  Miscalcula;ons  and  poor  design   •  Missed  or  inadequate  inspec;ons   •  Homemade  tools  and  equipment   DROPPED OBJECTS
  11. 11. Risk Awareness •  Poor  housekeeping     –  Unorganized  //  unclean   workplace     –  Unnecessary  movement  and   ;me  at  height   –  Cords  laying  across   walkways,  plaYorms,  etc.   –  Foreign  material  concerns   HOUSEKEEPING
  12. 12. Risk Awareness •  Improper  equipment  transport     –  Not  maintaining  3  points  of  contact     –  Overloading  a  climber   •  Physical  toll  on  body   •  Exceeding  fall  protec;on  capacity   –  Overflowing  containers   –  Using  improper  rated  containers   EQUIPMENT TRANSPORTATION
  13. 13. Costs of Not Taking Action 1.  Injury  or  Fatality   2.  Damage   3.  Lost  Produc;vity  
  14. 14. Costs •  Dropped  Objects   –  Struck  by  falling  object  (worker  or  bystander)   –  Falls  from  height   •  Gut  reac;on  trying  to  catch  falling  object   •  Tool  pulling  worker  down  with  it  if  tethered  improperly     •  Poor  housekeeping  and  transport   –  Slips,  trips  and  falls  (same  level  or  from  height)   –  Sprains  and  strains   –  Struck  by  falling  objects   INJURY OR FATALITY
  15. 15. Costs •  US:  In  2012,  there  were  509  fatali;es   from  being  struck  by  an  object  or   equipment.  (476  in  2011)   •  241  of  these  fatali;es  were   caused  by  a  falling  object  (219  in   2011)   –  Represents  46%  of  all     “Struck  By”  fatali;es  (same  in  2011)   –  Represents  just  over  5%  of  all   workplace  fatali;es  (5%  in  2011)   INJURY OR FATALITY *Source:  www.bls.gov  (2012  data)  
  16. 16. Costs •  Average  cost  per  worker  for  a  medically  consulted  injury:   $39,000   •  For  a  fatal  accident,  the  average  economic  cost  by  class  and   severity  is  approximately  $1.42  million  (per  fatality)   –  2012  fatali;es  =  241  x  $1.42  million  =  $342.2  Million!   –  Indirect  costs  not  included   –  No  dollar  amount  compares  to  a  worker  not  coming  home   to  their  family   INJURY OR FATALITY *Na;onal  Safety  Council  Injury  Facts  2012    
  17. 17. Costs •  UK:  Health  &  Safety  Execu;ve     •  In  2012  &  2013,  there  were  7,456   reported  struck  by  incidents  including   struck  by  flying/falling  objects   –  10  fatali;es  (21  in  2012)   –  2,075  non-­‐fatal  major  injuries   –  5,371  over  seven  day  injuries   •  This  represents  13%  of  all  reported   accidents   INJURY OR FATALITY *hqp://www.hse.gov.uk/sta;s;cs/  (RIDDOR   Table  RIDKIND1  –  2012/13)  
  18. 18. Costs •  Australia   –  In  2013,  there  were  24   fatali;es  from  being  struck  by   a  falling  object   –  Represen;ng  13%  of   workplace  fatality  in  2013     –  In  2013,  there  were  24  falls   from  height  in  AUS!   INJURY OR FATALITY *Source:  hqp:// www.safeworkaustralia.gov.au/  (2013   Trauma;c  Injury  Fatali;es  Report)  
  19. 19. Costs •  Dropped  objects  can  cause  damage  to…   –  The  Dropped  Item  Itself   –  An  Object  Below   –  The  Structure  Being  Worked  On   –  Equipment  From  Foreign  Objects   –  The  Environment   DAMAGE
  20. 20. Costs •  Lost  produc;vity  can  result  from…   –  Work  stoppage  to  inves;gate  a  near  miss   –  Descending  back  down  to  retrieve     a  job  essen;al  tool  and  climbing  back  up     to  complete  task   LOST PRODUCTIVITY
  21. 21. Who Is At Risk? »  Utilities »  Telecommunications »  Construction »  Wind Energy »  Oil & Gas »  Mining »  Electricians/Service Techs »  Transportation AERIAL APPLICATIONS
  22. 22. Who Is At Risk? »  Nuclear »  Manufacturing »  Food Processing »  Transportation (Aviation) »  Underwater MRO »  Oil & Gas »  Mining »  Construction NON-AERIAL APPLICATIONS
  23. 23. CONTROLS & BEST PRACTICE
  24. 24. O@H Hierarchy of Controls (HOC)
  25. 25. HOC Overview
  26. 26. O@H Hierarchy of Controls (HOC)
  27. 27. Hierarchy of Controls •  O@H  Defini;on   –  Secondary  Protec;on  Solu;ons   –  Protects/covers  the  worker  or  deflects   an  object  auer  it  has  fallen   •  Examples:   –  Hard  Hats,  Steel  Toe  Boots,  Eyewear,   Hand  Protec;on     PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT {PPE}
  28. 28. O@H Hierarchy of Controls (HOC)
  29. 29. Hierarchy of Controls •  O@H  Defini;on   –  Changing  the  behavior  of  individuals     •  Awareness  &  Communica;on   –  Signs,  S;ckers,  Barricade  Tape   –  Tool  Box  Talks   –  Training,  Training,  Training!   •  Policies  &  Procedures   –  Checklists  (Pre,  During,  Post  Job)   –  “Red  Areas”  or  “Drop  Zones”   –  Hois;ng  vs  Carrying  Procedures   ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROLS
  30. 30. O@H Hierarchy of Controls (HOC)
  31. 31. Hierarchy of Controls •  O@H  Defini;on   –  Aims  to  prevent  the  object  from   falling  (keeps  them  from  happening)   •  Two  types   –  Passive  Engineering  Controls   •  Does  not  require  ac;ve  par;cipa;on   from  the  worker   –  Ac;ve  Engineering  Controls   •  Requires  ac;ve  par;cipa;on  from   the  worker     ENGINEERING CONTROLS
  32. 32. Hierarchy of Controls •  Passive  Engineering  Controls   –  Toe  Boards,  Nexng,  Guarding,   Barricading,  Secondary  Reten;on     ENGINEERING CONTROLS
  33. 33. Hierarchy of Controls •  Ac;ve  Engineering  Controls   –  Connectors,  Lanyards,  Topped   Containers     ENGINEERING CONTROLS
  34. 34. WHAT DO THE REGULATORS SAY?
  35. 35. Regulations •  US:  OSHA   –  Scaffolds:  1926.451(h)  –  “falling  object  protec;on”   –  Fall  Protec;on:  1926.501(c)  –  "Protec;on  from  falling   objects"   –  Steel  Erec;on:1926.759(a)  –  “Securing  loose  items  alou”   –  General  Duty  Clause     •  CAN:  Canada  OH&S  Regula;ons   –  Na;onal  regula;on  men;ons  risk  in  3  specific  applica;ons   –  “Protect  Your  Head!”  ar;cle:  “Hard  hats  are  the  only  piece   of  equipment  that  can  protect  you  against  these  risks.”  –   NOT  TRUE!   *USA Department of Labor – OSHA 1926: www.osha.gov *Govt of Canada: www.labour.gc.ca
  36. 36. Regulations •  UK:  HSE  Work  at  Height  Regula;on   –  Falling  Objects  (10)  –  Every  employer  shall  take  steps  to   prevent  the  fall  of  any  material  or  object.     •  AUS:  Model  Workplace  Health  &  Safety  (WHS)     –  Division  10  Falling  objects   •  Management  of  risk  of  falling  objects   •  Minimizing  risk  associated  with  falling  objects     •  BRA:  MTE  Ministry  of  Labor  and  Employment   –  “using  tools  with  mooring  to  prevent  their  accidental  fall”   *Work at Heights Regulations 2005: www.legislation.gov.uk *Safe Work Australia – Model WHS Regulations: http:// www.safeworkaustralia.gov.au *Brasil MTE: http://portal.mte.gov.br/portal-mte/
  37. 37. DROPS •  DROPS:  Dropped  Objects   Preven;on  Scheme   –  Focused  on  preven;ng   dropped  objects  in  the  Oil  &   Gas  industry   –  Work  to  spread  awareness,   create  best  prac;ces,  and   promote  safety   –  Over  130  members  worldwide   –  Ergodyne  is  a  proud  member     –  www.dropsonline.org    
  38. 38. SOLUTIONS
  39. 39. Hierarchy Of Controls OBJECTS  AT  HEIGHTS  SOLUTIONS    
  40. 40. Administrative Controls AWARENESS & EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS
  41. 41. Administrative Controls •  Pre-­‐task  Assessments,  Checks  and   Precau;ons:   –  Sta;c  and  Dynamic  Dropped  Objects   Controls   –  Task  Planning   –  Before  Star;ng  Work   –  Working  at  Height   –  Tasks  Involving  Loading  or  Liuing   –  Liu  Plans  and  Collision  Checklist   Examples   POLICIES & PROCEDURES: DROPS GUIDELINES
  42. 42. Hierarchy of Controls OBJECTS  AT  HEIGHTS  SOLUTIONS    
  43. 43. •  Trapped   –  Captures  a  connec;on  point  on  tools   that  do  not  have  one  built  in.   •  Tethered   –  Prevents  object  from  falling  by  securing   to  a  worker  or  other  anchor  point.   •  Topped   –  Cover  buckets,  pouches,  and  other   containers  to  avoid  spilling  their   contents.   ACTIVE SOLUTIONS: THE 3 T’s OF O@H SAFETY
  44. 44. //TRAPPED
  45. 45. The Issue •  Overview   –  Most  tools  lack  convenient   connec;on  points   –  Aqaching  a  lanyard  is  the  most   challenging  part  of  tethering   –  Un;l  tool  manufacturers   change  designs,  retrofit   solu;ons  will  be  needed   LACK OF BUILT-IN CONNECTION POINTS
  46. 46. The Solution A COMPLETE TETHERING SYSTEM
  47. 47. //TETHERED
  48. 48. The Issue •  Factors   1.  Capacity:  Weight  of  the  item  being   tethered   2.  Connectors:  Type  of  connec;on   needed  for  tool     3.  Clearance,  reach,  and     snag  hazard:  Length  of     lanyard  and  amount  of  retrac;on   CHOOSING THE RIGHT TOOL LANYARD
  49. 49. Tethered •  Tool  Lanyards   –  Know  the  type  of  lanyard  needed   to  do  the  job  
  50. 50. Tethered •  Other  Lanyards   –  Secure  more  than  just   your  tools  
  51. 51. //TOPPED
  52. 52. Topped •  Factors   1.  Carrying  vs.  Hois;ng  –  Limit  the  weight   on  the  climber’s  body  and  allow  for   climbing  with  3  points  of  contact  at  all   ;mes.   2.  Type  of  Equipment  –  Whether  small   parts  or  large  objects,  the  container   should  have  a  top,  closure,  or  ;e  down.   3.  Weight  of  the  Equipment  –  Compare  to   the  capacity  of  container.   4.  Container  Material  –  What  type  of   material  is  best  for  the  elements  being   worked  in.  
  53. 53. Topped •  Carrying –  Pouches & Bags –  Avoid spilling contents when bending, twisting, or reaching
  54. 54. Topped •  Hoisting –  Buckets & bags –  Secure contents if container tips over or catches while in transit
  55. 55. Tested & Tagged •  All  solu;ons  are  third  party  cer;fied     •  Stringently  tested  using  a  safety  factor   –  Tool  Lanyards  =  2:1  (dynamic)  dropped   mul;ple  ;mes   –  Bags  and  Buckets  =  4:1  (sta;c)  held  for   length  of  ;me   •  Why  safety  factors?     –  Individuals  know  their  weight  but  likely   guess  their  equipment’s   –  High  poten;al  for  misuse     •  All  equipment  marked  with     cer;fied  capacity  informa;on   RECOMMENDED GUIDELINES FOR O@H EQUIPMENT
  56. 56. ONE FINAL CONSIDERATION Your  primary  preven;on  to  dropped   objects…  
  57. 57. …Your Grip! •  Hand  Protec;on   –  Choose  a  glove  with  ample   grip  and  dexterity   –  Consider  the  elements  being   worked  in  (hot/cold  temps)   –  Consider  the  materials  being   worked  with  (grease,  oil,  etc.)   –  Consider  the  other  hand   protec;on  risks  on  the  job  
  58. 58. LET’S REVIEW…
  59. 59. Summary •  Objects  at  Heights  Safety  should  be  a  part  of  every  safety   at  heights  plan:  secure  people  and  objects!   •  Objects  at  Heights  Plans  should  have  drop  preven;on,   housekeeping,  and  safe  transport  prac;ces  in  place  for   increased  safety.   •  Use  the  hierarchy  of  controls  by  implemen;ng   Engineering  Controls  (PREVENTION)  in  addi;on  to   Administra;on  Controls  and  PPE  Controls  (PROTECTION).   •  Remember  the  3  T’s:  Trapped,  Tethered,  and  Topped.   •  Make  sure  your  equipment  is  Tested  and  Tagged  by  the   manufacturer.  
  60. 60. Thank You! For  ques;ons  or  comments,  please  e-­‐mail   webinars@tenaquip.com  

×