Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.

Eng mlv japani

350 vues

Publié le

Human technology and the users' point of view

Publié dans : Technologie, Business
  • Identifiez-vous pour voir les commentaires

  • Soyez le premier à aimer ceci

Eng mlv japani

  1. 1. HUMAN TECHNOLOGY AND THE USERS’ POINT OF VIEW Marja-Liisa Viherä, Dr.Ph Sonera Informations Society Unit
  2. 2. Informational stage / form of development Restructured / Newly stuctured capitalism Global networks of material exchange (instrumental) Innovations New technology Capital intensity Globalization New technologigal and economic paradigm / New paradigm of technology and economy People and communities Everyday processes / everyday life Local conditions Basic tension The tension between the global network and local identity Uncertainty Uncontrolla-bility Conflicts Democracy deficit Alienation Falling out / dropping out Source: Ari-Veikko Anttiroiko
  3. 3. Use of the network connections among Finns % at the end of 1999 Source: Juha Nurmela, 2000
  4. 4. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Total Men 10–30 yrs Men 31+ yrs Women 10–30 yrs Women 31+ yrs TELEPHONE THE MOST PREFERRED % ( agree completely or to some extent on the statement ) 1996 1999 Source: Juha Nurmela, 2000 Experience with the most preferred transaction tool according to sex and age in percentages in 1996 and 1999
  5. 5. How people feel about themselves and IT development 0 % 20 % 40 % 60 % 80 % 15-19 y 20-24 y 24-29 y 30-34 y 35-39 y 40-44 y 45-49 y 50-54 y 55-59 y 60-64 y 65- y men women of the whole age group Agree completely or to some extent with the claim: ”I feel I have been completely left out of the development of modern computer and information technology ”
  6. 6. Participation and activity Commitment Understanding and objectives Basic needs of existence To belong To do To be organised
  7. 7. Communication capabilities Communication capability Access Competence Motivation
  8. 8. Communication capabilities Access Competence Motivation Access Competence Motivation
  9. 9. The Requirements of Communications <ul><li>Family </li></ul><ul><li>Friends </li></ul><ul><li>Hobbies/ Interest </li></ul><ul><li>Work </li></ul><ul><li>Study </li></ul><ul><li>Services </li></ul><ul><li>etc. </li></ul>
  10. 10. A A A C C C M M M A C M Can’t interpret the message A C M No motivation to join the community A = Access C = Competence M = Motivation Compatible access, competence and motive for social communication A C M There is no compatible access
  11. 11. Message Message Message Message Idea Thought Information in Physical form Information in Physical form Consolidating Formation Coding Transmission Decoding Interpretation Thinking Sender Recipient Transmission model of communication Technical Viewpoint
  12. 12. Message Message Message Message Idea Thought Information in physical form Information in physical form Consolidating Formation Coding Transmission Decoding Interpretation Thinking Sender Recipient Cultural Viewpoint Cultural anthropology, sociology , psycology, education, speech communications, etc
  13. 13. Message Message Message Message Idea Thought Information in physical form Information in physical form Consolidating Formation Coding Transmission Decoding Interpretation Thinking Sender Recipient Cultural Viewpoint Technical Viewpoint
  14. 14. Message Message Message Message Idea Thought Information in physical form Information in physical form Consolidating Formation Coding Transmission Decoding Interpretation Thinking Sender Recipient Communication is both a cultural and technical phenomenon
  15. 15. Transmission of Information Technology Group Community Users of information technology Viewpoint of the use of information technology Communication culture Agreed lines of action Individual function Source: Kallio, Jäkälä, 2000 Individual rational adaptive social
  16. 16. In developing organisations, communication systems, content and communication skills and organisational communication culture are equally important. Social capital accumulates as a total of these contributory factors.
  17. 17. THE VISION OF THE COMMUNICATIVE SOCIETY Neighbourhood shops mini-eco-logistics Interactive network Learning by networking in small schools Alternative solutions Enjoyment possibilities LEARNING preservation of compulsory education, development of learning diversity WELFARE social and health care through networking MANAGEMENT OF DAILY AFFAIRS shopping and errands RESIDENCE diverse living and working areas COMMUTING AND TRAVELING flexible, environment-friendly traffic solutions WORK many-sided business structure ENVIRONMENT ENTERTAINMENT according to one’s choice DECISION MAKING participative and representative democracy Sharing know-how openly Local voting rights Initiatives from the people Trade and artisan skills Light vehicle traffic Togetherness Co-operative work stations The demands if networked small businesses for high-level know-how Lifelong learning = learning in intervals Constructive experimental learning SOCIAL CAPITAL networks, work communities, norms, regulations Services nearby Multi-service points Network secretary Commuting in groups Services Transparent decision-making system Common recreation area Energy management and control
  18. 18. Information Society Is a Possibility Development of communication culture Growth of well-being Innovative community Growth of social capital

×