Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.

From Aspiration to Reality: Open Smart Cities

484 vues

Publié le

From Aspiration to Reality: Open Smart Cities
Open smart cities might become a reality for Canada.  Globally there are a number of initiatives, programs, and practices that are open smart city like which means that it is possible to have an open, responsive and engaged city that is both socio-technologically enabled, but also one where there is receptivity to and a willingness to grow a critically informed type of technological citizenship (Feenberg). For an open smart city to exist, public officials, the private sector, scholars, civil society and residents and citizens require a definition and a guide to start the exercise of imagining what an open smart city might look like. There is much critical scholarship about the smart city and there are many counter smart city narratives, but there are few depictions of what engagement, participatory design and technological leadership might be. The few examples that do exist are project based and few are systemic. An open smart city definition and guide was therefore created by a group of stakeholders in such a way that it can be used as the basis for the design of an open smart city from the ground up, or to help actors shape or steer the course of emerging or ongoing data and networked urbanist forms (Kitchin) of smart cities to lead them towards being open, engaged and receptive to technological citizenship.
This talk will discuss some of the successes resulting from this Open Smart Cities work, which might also be called a form or engaged scholarship. For example the language for the call for tender of the Infrastructure Canada Smart City Challenge was modified to include as a requisite that engagement and openness be part of the submissions from communities. Also, those involved with the guide have been writing policy articles that critique either AI or the smart city while also offering examples of what is possible. These articles are being read by proponents of Sidewalk Labs in Toronto. Also, the global Open Data Conference held in Argentina in September of 2018 hosted a full workshop on Open Smart Cities and finally Open North is working toward developing key performance indicators to assess those shortlisted by Infrastructure Canada and to help those communities develop an Open Smart Cities submission. The objective of the talk is to demonstrate that it is actually possible to shift public policy on large infrastructure projects, at least, in the short term.

  • Identifiez-vous pour voir les commentaires

From Aspiration to Reality: Open Smart Cities

  1. 1. Centre for Ethics Ethics in the City Lecture Series From Aspiration to Reality: Open Smart Cities January 16, 2018 16:00 PM - 18:00 PM University of Toronto Rm 200, Larkin Building Dr. Tracey P. Lauriault Assistant Professor of Critical Media and Big Data Communication and Media Studies, School of Journalism and Communication Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada Tracey.Lauriault@Carleton.ca ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0003-1847-2738
  2. 2. Seminar 1. Technological Citizenship 2. Openness 3. Critical Data Studies 4. Theoretical framework • Assemblage • Social-Shaping 5. Open Smart Cities • Open Smart Cities Project • Smart City Context in Canada • Research & Methodology • Case Studies • Observations • Open Smart City Guide 6. Open Smart City Readiness 7. Q&A
  3. 3. 1. Technological Citizenship
  4. 4. 1.1 Technological Citizenship • We live in a technological society • Decisions about technology are political • We should not leave all technological decisions to the technocrats • 3 preconditions for technological citizenship • Agency • Capacity to act – power • Knowledge • Those who possess those preconditions have the responsibility to act and intervene in the technological society Andrew Feenberg, 2011 https://www.sfu.ca/~andrewf/copen5-1.pdf
  5. 5. 1.2 Data Colonialism, • Data colonialism • Dispossession of personal & individual data (EULA) • Privatization of those data (by those who create the platform/app) • Commodification of those data (resale of those data) • Data are also colonizing lifeworlds • Frontier mentality • Utopic digital/data frontier • Manifest destiny of big data systems Thatcher, O’Sullivan & Mahmoudi, 2016 https://doi-org.proxy.library.carleton.ca/10.1177/0263775816633195
  6. 6. 1.3 Doing Citizenship in a Technological Society • Technology • assemble to form the setting where citizenship unfolds • is part of what constitutes a good life which makes it part of politics • and technological decisions bring forward moral and ethical issues • Technology and citizenship are related in 3 ways: 1. Technology as a means for citizenship 2. Technology as an object 3. Technology as a setting for political judgement • Technology ought to be politicized and technological fundamentalism ought to be scrutinized while questions of what is just and good should be asked. Darin Barney, 2007 http://darinbarneyresearch.mcgill.ca/Work/One_Nation_Under_Google.pdf
  7. 7. 2. Openness
  8. 8. 2.1 Openness Open Access Open Source Open Data Open Science Open Firmware Open Platforms Open AI Open Specifications Open Standards Open Government Open Smart Cities
  9. 9. 2.2 Data Communities of Practice Research/scientific Data GovData GeoData Physical Sciences AdminData Public Sector Data NGOs Access to Data Open Data Social Sciences 2005 Operations Data Infrastructural Data Sensor Data Social Media Data AI/Machine Learning Data Smart Open Data? 2015 Private Sector IOT - Smart Cities - Precision Agriculture - Autonomous Cars SM Platforms Algorithms P2P – Sharing Economy Predictive Policing Surveillance Digital Labour Drones 5GPublic/Private Sector Data? Crowdsourcing Citizen Science Civic Teck OCAP Local and Traditional Knowledge
  10. 10. 3. Critical Data Studies
  11. 11. 3.1 Critical Data Studies
  12. 12. Research and thinking that applies critical social theory to data & technology to explore the ways in which: Data are more than the unique arrangement of objective and politically neutral facts & Understands that data do not exist independently of ideas, techniques, technologies, systems, people and contexts regardless of them being presented in that way 3.2 Data – big or small Tracey P. Lauriault, 2012, Data, Infrastructures and Geographical Imaginations. Ph.D. Thesis, Carleton University, Ottawa, http://curve.carleton.ca/theses/27431
  13. 13. 3.3 Framing Data 1. Technically 2. Ethically 3. Politically & economically 4. Spatial/Temporal 5. Philosophically 6. Technological Citizenship 7. Data Activism Rob Kitchin, 2014, The Data Revolution, Sage. Tracey P. Lauriault, engaged research
  14. 14. 3.4 Critical Data Studies Vision • Unpack the complex assemblages that produce, circulate, share/sell and utilise data in diverse ways; • Chart the diverse work they do and their consequences for how the world is known, governed and lived-in; • Survey the wider landscape of data assemblages and how they interact to form intersecting data products, services and markets and shape policy and regulation. Toward Critical Data Studies: Charting and Unpacking Data Assemblages and Their Work By Rob Kitchin and Tracey P. Lauriault in Thinking Big Data in Geography New Regimes, (Eds) Jim Thatcher, Josef Eckert, and Andrew Shears (2018)
  15. 15. 4. Theoretical Framework
  16. 16. 4.1 Socio-Technological Assemblage Material Platform (infrastructure – hardware) Code Platform (operating system) Code/algorithms (software) Data(base) Interface Reception/Operation (user/usage) Systems of thought Forms of knowledge Finance Political economies Governmentalities - legalities Organisations and institutions Subjectivities and communities Marketplace System/process performs a task Context frames the system/task Digital socio-technical assemblage HCI, Remediation studies Critical code studies Software studies New media studies Game studies Critical Social Science Science Technology Studies Platform studies Places Practices Flowline/Lifecycle Surveillance Studies Critical data studies Algorithm Studies Modified by Lauriault from Kitchin, 2014, The Data Revolution, Sage.
  17. 17. 4.2 Social-shaping qualities of data Kitchin, 2012, Programmable City, http://progcity.maynoothuniversity.ie/about/
  18. 18. 5. Open Smart Cities
  19. 19. 5.1.1 Open Smart Cities in Canada Project Funded by: GeoConnections Lead by: OpenNorth Project core team: • Rachel Bloom & Jean-Noe Landry, Open North • Dr. Tracey P. Lauriault, Carleton University • David Fewer, LL.M., Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC) • Dr. Mark Fox, University of Toronto • Research Assistants Carleton University • Carly Livingstone • Stephen Letts Project collaborators: • Expert Smart City representatives from the cities of: 1. Edmonton 2. Guelph 3. Montréal 4. Ottawa • Collaborators include experts from the provinces of: 1. Ontario 2. British Columbia Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  20. 20. 5.1.2 Project Outputs 1. Executive summary of a smart city environmental scan (E-Scan) and 5 Canadian case studies. • This report identifies international shapers of smart cities and their components and describes current smart city practices across Canada. 2. Assessment of Canadian smart city practices • In depth city profiles were developed as a result of interviews with smart city representatives from the cities of Edmonton, Guelph, Montreal, and Ottawa.. 3. Review of selected open smart city best practices in 4 international cities (Chicago, Dublin, Helsinki, and New York) • The literature review focuses on approaches to open and geospatial data standardization in a smart city context. These cities were chosen for their innovative geospatial and open data policies and practices. 4. Inter-jurisdictional case study • To situate open smart city policies and data management practices in Canada’s inter-jurisdictional context, interviews with officials from the Province of Ontario and consulted with officials at the Province of British Columbia. 5. Open Smart Cities FAQ • In collaboration with the Open Smart Cities in Canada core team, the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC) has created a FAQ to answer common legal and regulatory questions about smart city technologies. 6. Open Smart Cities Guide V1.0 • This final phase of the project provides a definition for an Open Smart City. This output intends to guide Canadian municipalities toward co-creating Open Smart Cities with their stakeholders and residents. Results will be disseminated broadly and were presented during the project’s third webinar on April 17. Watch the presentation here. Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  21. 21. 5.2 Context in Canada
  22. 22. 5.2.1 Smart City Challenge • Launched November 2017, 225 Submissions, 130 Eligible, 20 shortlisted • Municipalities, regional governments, & Indigenous communities • Community not-for-profit, private sector company, or expert • $300 million Smart Cities Challenge in 2017 Budget 22
  23. 23. 5.2.2 Canada Smart City Challenge http://www.infrastructure.gc.ca/sc-vi/map-applications.php https://impact.canada.ca/en/challenges/smart-cities/results
  24. 24. 5.2.3 Sidewalk Toronto the PPP Smart City https://sidewalktoronto.ca/
  25. 25. 5.3 Open Smart Cities Research Methodology
  26. 26. 5.3.1 Data collection & Methodology • E-Scan of 4 cities + 1 Province 1. Edmonton 2. Guelph 3. Ottawa 4. Montreal 5. Ontario Smart Grid • Development of semi-structured interview instrument • City officials generously participated in 90 min phone interviews • Interviews were recorded & transcribed • City officials responded to follow-up questions & validated reports The following was collected: • visions and strategies • reasons for deploying smart city initiatives • beneficiaries • governance models • deployment strategies • citizen engagement • “openness” and open data • access to smart city data • smart city business models • procurement • challenges & benefits. Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  27. 27. 5.3.2 Smart City Actors • Vendors • Think tanks • Consulting firms • Alliances and associations • Standards organizations • Civil society • Academic • Procurement • Guides, Playbooks, Practices • Indicators • Cities Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  28. 28. 5.4 4 Canadian Cities, 1 Province, International Best Practices
  29. 29. 5.4.1 Edmonton - Smart City Initiative The smart city is “about creating and nurturing a resilient, livable, and workable city through the use of technology, data and social innovation” Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  30. 30. 5.4.2 Guelph - Initiative “The vision of a modern City is one that offers services to customers when and where they want them. A Smart City is one that uses technology to achieve this goal, using technology at every appropriate opportunity to streamline processes and simplify access to city services. This is a city that has all the information it needs, available and accessible, to support effective decision- making” Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  31. 31. 5.4.3 Ottawa - Initiative Connected City • Create a city where all residents and busi-nesses are connected in an efficient, affordable, and ubiquitous way. Smart Economy • Stimulate economic growth by supporting knowledge-based business expansion and attraction, local entre-preneurs, and smart talent development. Innovative Government • Develop new and innovative ways to impact the lives of residents and businesses through the creative use of new service delivery models, technology solutions, and partnerships. Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  32. 32. 5.4.4 Montréal – Ville Intelligente, Strategy & Action Plan “A smart and digital city means better services for citizens, a universally higher standard of living and harnessing of our metropolis’s resources to ensure its development is in line with the population’s needs” Vice Chair of the Executive Committee, responsible for the smart city, Harout Chitilian Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  33. 33. 5.4.5 Ontario Smart Grid The Electricity Act, 1998242 defines a Smart Grid as follows: • (1.3) For the purposes of this Act, the smart grid means the advanced information exchange systems and equipment that when utilized together improve the flexibility, security, reliability, efficiency and safety of the integrated power system and distribution systems, particularly for the purposes of • (a) enabling the increased use of renewable energy sources and technology, including generation facilities connected to the distribution system; • (b) expanding opportunities to provide demand response, price information and load control to electricity customers; • (c) accommodating the use of emerging, innovative and energy saving technologies and system control applications; or • (d) supporting other objectives that may be prescribed by regulation. 2009, c. 12, Sched. B, s. 1 (5). Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  34. 34. 5.4.6 International Best Practices • Chicago • Helsinki • New York • Barcelona • Dublin Open smart cities include: • Rights (GDPR & right to repair) • Are in the public interest • Ethics (Quebec, NyC, Helsinki, Chicago) • Environmental considerations • Critical and meaningful public engagement & dialogue not just consultation • Ecosystems approach (ASDI and Dublin Report) Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  35. 35. 5.5 Observations
  36. 36. Digital Strategies Open Data Open Science Open Platform Open Source Open Government 5.5.1 Smart Cities - Openness YesNo MaybeUnlikely Smart Cities/ Precision Ag/ IoT Likely
  37. 37. Mapping openness onto the smart city requires the Integration of digital practices Alllevelsofgovernment 5.5.2 Smart Cities – Openness
  38. 38. 5.5.3 What did we learn • Smart cities are new & emerging & citizens do not generally know what is coming, may not be the drivers • Need to identify issues to be resolved with technology instead of technology looking for issues • More data does not mean better governance • Very few overarching socio-technical and ethical considerations • Requirement for technological citizenship • Is this an innovation bias or is it a smart city that is best for the City, the environment and its residents? Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  39. 39. 5.5.4 Smart City Challenges • Data governance – residency, privacy, etc. • Security & privacy vulnerabilities (hacking) • E-waste – cost, short shelf life • Mission creep - potential • Surveillance / dataveillance potential • Ownership / procurement • Repair – DRM • Device lock in • Archiving - the lack thereof • Reuse – unintended purposes • Sustainability, maintenance & management • Interoperability • Standards – emerging Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  40. 40. 5.6 Open Smart City Guide V 1.0
  41. 41. 5.6.1 What is a city?
  42. 42. A city is • a complex and dynamic socio-biological system • territorially bound • a human settlement • governed by public city officials who manage • the grey, blue and green environment • within their jurisdictional responsibility Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  43. 43. 5.6.2. What is a smart city?
  44. 44. A smart city is • technologically instrumented & networked w/ systems that are interlinked & integrated, where vast troves of big urban data are being generated by sensors & administrative processes used to manage & control urban life in real-time (Kitchin, 2018). • where administrators and elected officials invest in smart city technologies & data analytical systems to inform how to innovatively, economically, efficiently & objectively run & manage the city. • The focus is most often to quantify & manage infrastructure, mobility, business & online government services. • a form of technological solutionism. Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  45. 45. 5.6.3 What is an open smart city?
  46. 46. Definition of the Open Smart City V 1.0 An Open Smart City is where residents, civil society, academics, and the private sector collaborate with public officials to mobilize data and technologies when warranted in an ethical, accountable and transparent way to govern the city as a fair, viable and liveable commons and balance economic development, social progress and environmental responsibility. Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  47. 47. 5 Open Smart City Themes 1. Governance 2. Engagement 3. Data & Technology 4. Data Governance 5. Effective and values based smart cities Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  48. 48. Theme 1. Governance in an Open Smart City is ethical, accountable, and transparent. These principles apply to the governance of social and technical platforms which include data, algorithms, skills, infrastructure, and knowledge. Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  49. 49. Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  50. 50. Theme 1. Resources arranged as follows: • Ethical Governance • Governance Structures and Participation • Cooperative and Multi-jurisdictional Governance • Accountable Governance • Transparent Governance • Cooperative Governance Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  51. 51. Theme 2. An Open Smart City is participatory, collaborative, and responsive. It is a city where government, civil society, the private sector, the media, academia and residents meaningfully participate in the governance of the city and have shared rights and responsibilities. This entails a culture of trust and critical thinking and fair, just, inclusive, and informed approaches. Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  52. 52. Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  53. 53. Theme 2. Resources arranged as follows: •Participatory •Collaborative •Responsive •Trust •Critical Thinking •Fair & Just •Inclusive & Informed Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  54. 54. Theme 3. An Open Smart City uses data and technologies that are fit for purpose, can be repaired and queried, their source code are open, adhere to open standards, are interoperable, durable, secure, and where possible locally procured and scalable. Data and technology are used and acquired in such a way as to reduce harm and bias, increase sustainability and enhance flexibility. An Open Smart City may defer when warranted to automated decision making and therefore designs these systems to be legible, responsive, adaptive and accountable. Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  55. 55. Theme 3. Resources arranged as follows: • Fit for Purpose • Repaired and Queried • Open Source • Open Standards • Cybersecurity and Data Security • Reduction of Harm and Bias • Local Procurement • Balancing Sustainability Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  56. 56. Theme 4. In an Open Smart City, data management is the norm and custody and control over data generated by smart technologies is held and exercised in the public interest. Data governance includes sovereignty, residency, open by default, security, individual and social privacy, and grants people authority over their personal data. Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  57. 57. Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  58. 58. Theme 4. Resources arranged as follows: • Data Management • Custody of Data • Residency • Open by Default • Security • Privacy • Personal Data Management Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  59. 59. Theme 5. In an Open Smart City, it is recognized that data and technology are not always the solution to many of the systemic issues cities face, nor are there always quick fixes. These problems require innovative, sometimes long term, social, organizational, economic, and political processes and solutions. Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  60. 60. Theme 5. Complex urban social issues need more than technology for resolution: Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  61. 61. 6. Aspirations become reality! Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  62. 62. 6.1 Open Smart City Assessment Open Smart City Principles Open Smart City Definition High Level Strategy Vision Mission RoadMap Goals, Objectives, Initiatives Tactical Strategy Implementation Plan Operational Plan Engagement Environment Transit / transport Energy Economy Innovation Etc. Liveable Communities Lauriault, T. P. , Bloom, R. Landry, J.-N. 2018, Open Smart Cities Project https://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide
  63. 63. 6.2 Open Smart City work at Open North • Part of a consortium, led by Evergreen’s Future Cities Canada Program, • to create the winning proposal to Infrastructure Canada’s Smart Cities Community Support Program. • OpenNorth is the lead technical partner in this partnership with Evergreen. • 2019 kick off brings a new kind of organisational work on open smart cities. • OpenNorth’s new One-to-One (1:1) Advisory Service • will utilize applied research to provide standardized metrics and assessments to help communities assess where they are in the process of becoming open and smart. • Once completed, OpenNorth will offer tailored guidance on a community-by- community basis focused on capacity building domains that cover: • hardware, • software, • governance, and more, • to assess impact
  64. 64. Project Outputs • Open Smart Cities in Canada: Environmental-Scan and Case Studies – Executive Summary • (https://osf.io/preprints/socarxiv/e4fs8/ ) • Open Smart Cities in Canada: Assessment Report • (https://osf.io/preprints/socarxiv/qbyzj/ ) • Open Smart Cities Legal FAQ • (https://cippic.ca/en/Open_Smart_Cities ) • Webinars 1 & 2 & 3 • (http://bit.ly/2yp7H8k and https://vimeo.com/247378746 ) • Open Smart Cities Guide V1.0 • (http://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide )
  65. 65. Final Remarks • The Open Smart City Guide V1.0 is a Living Document to be updated on a regular basis and we are counting on you for your help. • http://www.opennorth.ca/open-smart-cities-guide • Please send feedback, ideas, critiques etc. to • info@opennorth.ca
  66. 66. Questions for you? Ethical Framework for a city? Governance Structure?
  67. 67. Q & A
  68. 68. Abstract • From Aspiration to Reality: Open Smart Cities • Open smart cities might become a reality for Canada. Globally there are a number of initiatives, programs, and practices that are open smart city like which means that it is possible to have an open, responsive and engaged city that is both socio-technologically enabled, but also one where there is receptivity to and a willingness to grow a critically informed type of technological citizenship (Feenberg). For an open smart city to exist, public officials, the private sector, scholars, civil society and residents and citizens require a definition and a guide to start the exercise of imagining what an open smart city might look like. There is much critical scholarship about the smart city and there are many counter smart city narratives, but there are few depictions of what engagement, participatory design and technological leadership might be. The few examples that do exist are project based and few are systemic. An open smart city definition and guide was therefore created by a group of stakeholders in such a way that it can be used as the basis for the design of an open smart city from the ground up, or to help actors shape or steer the course of emerging or ongoing data and networked urbanist forms (Kitchin) of smart cities to lead them towards being open, engaged and receptive to technological citizenship. • This talk will discuss some of the successes resulting from this Open Smart Cities work, which might also be called a form or engaged scholarship. For example the language for the call for tender of the Infrastructure Canada Smart City Challenge was modified to include as a requisite that engagement and openness be part of the submissions from communities. Also, those involved with the guide have been writing policy articles that critique either AI or the smart city while also offering examples of what is possible. These articles are being read by proponents of Sidewalk Labs in Toronto. Also, the global Open Data Conference held in Argentina in September of 2018 hosted a full workshop on Open Smart Cities and finally Open North is working toward developing key performance indicators to assess those shortlisted by Infrastructure Canada and to help those communities develop an Open Smart Cities submission. The objective of the talk is to demonstrate that it is actually possible to shift public policy on large infrastructure projects, at least, in the short term.
  69. 69. Acknowledgements Open Smart City Research was onducted in collaboration with Open North, and funded by the GeoConnections Program, Natural Resources Canada I would like to thank all those who participated in interviews.

×