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Matthew Ovington - Snakes and ladders: Trust and motivation in online gaming

The building blocks of online trust are relatively well understood, especially with regard to eCommerce. Brand values, high street retail presence and customer-friendly policies all play a part in establishing trust in our online online gaming products. However, with online casino gaming, where the outcomes of games such as roulette or slots are governed by chance players are rightly sensitive to any real (or imagined!) house advantage. Establishing trust is only part of the solution. Trust must be nurtured in order to develop long and lasting relationships. The aim of this talk is to highlight findings with regard to what things engender feelings of trust and motivation in relation to online gaming.

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Matthew Ovington - Snakes and ladders: Trust and motivation in online gaming

  1. 1. Welcome to UCD2012 Sponsored by Supported by
  2. 2. 2pm Saturday 10th November Matthew Ovington Snakes and Ladders: Trust and motivation in online gaming Abstract: The building blocks of online trust are relatively well understood, especially with regard to eCommerce. Brand values, high street retail presence and customer-friendly policies all play a part in establishing trust in our online online gaming products. However, with online casino gaming, where the outcomes of games such as roulette or slots are governed by chance players are rightly sensitive to any real (or imagined!) house advantage. Establishing trust is only part of the solution. Trust must be nurtured in order to develop long and lasting relationships. The aim of this talk is to highlight findings with regard to what things engender feelings of trust and motivation in relation to online gaming. Thi s doc ument and i t ’ s c ont ent i s Copyri ght ©2012 [ M t hew Ovi ngt on and UCD UK Li m t ed. at iSupport ers Spons ors Organi s er 2
  3. 3. “The house always wins.”(over a statisticallysignificant period of time)
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  5. 5. RTP% (Return to Player %) •European Roulette has an RTP of 97.3% – 37 numbers (0-36) 18 red, 18 black, 1 green – 100/37 = 2.7% • Inside bet (number) pays 35/1 (2.7%) • Outside bet (colour) pays evens (48.6%) • 2.7% is the “house edge” or “margin” • 97.3% is “returned” to playersSupport ers Spons ors Organi s er 6
  6. 6. VolatilitySupport ers Spons ors Organi s er 7
  7. 7. • Biggest Concerns – Canadian Users 1. Poorer social atmosphere (no crowds, socially isolating) 2. Too easy to spend money 3. Safety of deposits, Wins paid out promptly 4. Lack of face-to-face contact 5. Too convenient Wood, R.T. & Williams, R.J. (2009) Internet Gambling: Prevalence, Patterns, Problems, and Policy Options. Final Report prepared for the Ontario Problem Gambling Research Centre, Guelph, Ontario, CANADA.Support ers Spons ors Organi s er 9
  8. 8. • Biggest Concerns – International Users 1. Assessing the fairness of games 2. Safety of deposits, wins paid out promptly 3. Lack of face-to-face contact 4. Illegality 5. Poorer social atmosphere (no crowds, socially isolating) Source: Wood, R.T. & Williams, R.J. (2009) Internet Gambling: Prevalence, Patterns, Problems, and Policy Options. Final Report prepared for the Ontario Problem Gambling Research Centre, Guelph, Ontario, CANADA.Support ers Spons ors Organi s er 10
  9. 9. Source: Egger, F.N. (2001). Affective Design of E-Commerce User Interfaces: How to Maximise PerceivedTrustworthiness. In: Helander, M., Khalid, H.M. & Tham (Eds.), Proceedings of CAHD2001: Conference on AffectiveHuman Factors Design, Singapore, June 27-29, 2001: 317-324.Support ers Spons ors Organi s er 11
  10. 10. Source: Egger, F.N. (2001). Affective Design of E-Commerce User Interfaces: How to Maximise PerceivedTrustworthiness. In: Helander, M., Khalid, H.M. & Tham (Eds.), Proceedings of CAHD2001: Conference on AffectiveHuman Factors Design, Singapore, June 27-29, 2001: 317-324.Support ers Spons ors Organi s er 12
  11. 11. • Is it legit? • Rely on “perceptions” of Interface Properties • Credibility – “first impressions” • Brand • Familiarity • Aesthetics • Security and SafetySupport ers Spons ors Organi s er 13
  12. 12. FamiliaritySupport ers Spons ors Organi s er 14
  13. 13. Aesthetics
  14. 14. Safety and securitySupport ers Spons ors Organi s er 16
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  16. 16. Source: Egger, F.N. (2001). Affective Design of E-Commerce User Interfaces: How to Maximise PerceivedTrustworthiness. In: Helander, M., Khalid, H.M. & Tham (Eds.), Proceedings of CAHD2001: Conference on AffectiveHuman Factors Design, Singapore, June 27-29, 2001: 317-324.Support ers Spons ors Organi s er 18
  17. 17. • Is it fair?• “Confirmation” of information • Winners • Social Proof • Game Recommendations • Game InformationSupport ers Spons ors Organi s er 19
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  22. 22. • Winners • Attainability • Perception of the unattainability of massive jackpots • Credibility • Avoid stock imagery • Curate real stories • Up to date, credible contentSupport ers Spons ors Organi s er 24
  23. 23. Social proofSupport ers Spons ors Organi s er 25
  24. 24. Social proofSupport ers Spons ors Organi s er 26
  25. 25. • Social Proof • Weak positive effect of large numbers. • Minority of players view it as a negative.Support ers Spons ors Organi s er 27
  26. 26. Suggested games
  27. 27. Suggested gamesSupport ers Spons ors Organi s er 29
  28. 28. • Suggested Games • Players suspicion of “recommendations” or “top games”. • “I wouldn’t take tips from a bookie.” • Sensitive to “hustle”.Support ers Spons ors Organi s er 30
  29. 29. • Game InformationSupport ers Spons ors Organi s er 31
  30. 30. Source: Egger, F.N. (2001). Affective Design of E-Commerce User Interfaces: How to Maximise PerceivedTrustworthiness. In: Helander, M., Khalid, H.M. & Tham (Eds.), Proceedings of CAHD2001: Conference on AffectiveHuman Factors Design, Singapore, June 27-29, 2001: 317-324.Support ers Spons ors Organi s er 32
  31. 31. • “Is my money safe?” • Low friction deposits, withdrawals & payouts. • “Am I being treated fairly” • Bonuses • Customer service • Respecting wishes • Player protection measures • RegulationSupport ers Spons ors Organi s er 33
  32. 32. “Facts and Fair Dealing”Support ers Spons ors Organi s er 34
  33. 33. Questions @matthewovington Thi s doc ument and i t ’ s c ont ent i s Copyri ght ©2012 [ M t hew Ovi ngt on and UCD UK Li m t ed. at iSupport ers Spons ors Organi s er 35
  34. 34. Welcome to UCD2012 Sponsored by Supported by

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