Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.

La migraine

1 323 vues

Publié le

Présentation du Dr. Lawrence Richer
University of Alberta

Publié dans : Formation
  • Soyez le premier à commenter

La migraine

  1. 1. Pediatric Headache and Migraine Current Management and Controversies in the  Emergency Department Lawrence Richer MD MSc FRCPC Associate Professor CHU Sainte Justine Oct 29, 2015
  2. 2. Disclosure • Faculty: Lawrence Richer • Relationships with commercial interests: – Grants/Research Support: CIHR Catalyst Grant, WCHRI – Speakers Bureau/Honoraria: N/A – Consulting Fees: N/A – Other: N/A • All recommendations made without RCT supporting evidence  in pediatrics is declared and only offered as a consideration
  3. 3. Objectives • Consider difference diagnosis of headache in  the Pediatric ED • Review basic migraine physiology as it relates  to migraine in the ED • Review current evidence for the treatment of  migraine in the ED  • Consider some controversies, unanswered  questions, and ‘best practices’
  4. 4. Headache in the ED • URTI • Minor head trauma • Primary headaches – 54% of all non‐traumatic neuro in ED • Secondary headaches – Vascular (stroke, RCVS, hemorrhage) – Intracranial hypertension (tumour, IIH) – Orthostatic headache (IC hypotension, POTS) – Metabolic disorders
  5. 5. Thunderclap Headache • Reaches 7 or more in < 1 min • Etiology – Subarachnoid hemorrhage – Other vascular • Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) – recurrence over days • Cerebral artery dissection • Pituitary apoplexy • Sinovenous thrombosis • Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) – Other (infectious, vasculitis, high or low ICP
  6. 6. Phases of migraine ED Charles A. The Evolution of a Migraine Attack - A Review of Recent Evidence. Headache. 2012 Dec 20. fatigue; euphoria;  depression; irritability;  food cravings;  constipation; neck  stiffness; increased  yawning; and/or  abnormal sensitivity to  light, sound, and smell 
  7. 7. Migraine Generator Trigeminovascular (neurovascular) unit Parasympathetic output (pterygopalatine ganglion) Hypothalamus via SSN  Cortex via cortical spreading depression (i.e. aura) Arachnoid membrane
  8. 8. Aura and Cortical Spreading Depression Positive (gain‐of‐function)  Negative (loss‐of‐function) Ferrari, M. D., et al. (2015). The Lancet.  http://doi.org/10.1016/S1474‐4422(14)70220‐0
  9. 9. CSD may trigger the  trigeminovascular system Ferrari, M. D., Klever, R. R., Terwindt, G. M., & Ayata, C. (2015). Migraine pathophysiology: lessons from mouse models and human genetics. The Lancet. http://doi.org/10.1016/S1474- 4422(14)70220-0
  10. 10. Brainstem activation as measured with PET in  spontaneous human migraine without aura attacks  Tfelt‐Hansen P Cephalalgia 2010;30:780‐792
  11. 11. Genetics • Familial Hemiplegic Migraine – Type 1 (CACNA1A) – vg P/Q type Ca++ channel – Type 2 (ATP1A2) – Na+/K+ ATPase pump – Type 3 (SCN1A) – vg Na+ channel – Other ‐ SLC1A3, PRRT2, and SLC4A4  • Susceptibility genes (clinic and population based) – Glumatminergic neurotransmission – Synapse development and plasticity – Pain sensing – Metalloproteinases – Vasculature and metabolism
  12. 12. Ferrari, M. D., Klever, R. R., Terwindt, G. M., & Ayata, C. (2015). Migraine pathophysiology: lessons from  mouse models and human genetics. The Lancet. http://doi.org/10.1016/S1474‐4422(14)70220‐0
  13. 13. Russo A, Tessitore A, Giordano A, et al. Cephalalgia. 2012 Oct;32(14):1041–8. Executive resting-state network connectivity in migraine without aura. Cognitive symptoms (attention deficit, difficulty finding  words, transient amnesia, and reduced ability to navigate  in familiar environments) 
  14. 14. Silberstein SD. Emerging target-based paradigms to prevent and treat migraine. Clin. Pharmacol. Ther. 2013 Jan;93(1):78–85.
  15. 15. WHEN SHOULD I IMAGE?
  16. 16. ACR Appropriateness Criteria for Child  with Headache  Primary Headache • No imaging is indicated for typical  migraine. • In ophthalmologic migraine with focal  neurologic symptoms of unilateral  ptosis or complete third‐nerve palsy,  MRI is recommended. • MRI is also recommended for patients  with miscellaneous findings such as  vertigo, basilar artery migraine  syndrome, persistent confusion  migraine syndrome, progressive chronic  headache, or hemiplegic migraine. • MRI should be performed for patients  with seizures and postictal headaches. Secondary Headache • If neurologic signs or symptoms of increased  intracranial pressure are present, MRI is  recommended. If MRI is not available or  there are problems with sedation, CT should  be performed. • CT of the head without intravenous contrast  is recommended for sudden severe  headaches (thunderclap headaches). • If subarachnoid hemorrhage is detected, CT  or conventional angiography should be  performed. MRA is also appropriate but is  generally considered less sensitive in  detecting small aneurysms. • If intracranial hemorrhage is present, MRI of  the brain should be performed if possible.  Obtaining a concomitant MRA is  recommended. Hayes LL, Coley BD, Karmazyn B et al. American College of Radiology. ACR Appropriateness Criteria. Headache—child.  Reston (VA): ACR [Internet]. 2012[cited 2015 Jun 25]; 8. Available from: https://acsearch.acr.org/docs/69439/Narrative/
  17. 17. CATCH rule
  18. 18. Appropriateness Rating  Category N  Imaged % Important  Abnormalities Incidental  Abnormalities Usually not appropriate 72 4 6% 0 1 May be appropriate 13 8 61% 1 1 Usually appropriate 10 8 80% 1 3 Imaging Audit - 95 patient visits sampled - Diagnosis: headache in 35, migraine in 53, meningeal infection in 1, neoplasm with hydrocephalus in 1, metabolic disease in 1 and other non-relevant conditions in 4 - 4 patients imaged did not meet any appropriateness criteria, but each had prior neurosurgery Hayes LL, Coley BD, Karmazyn B et al. American College of Radiology. ACR Appropriateness Criteria. Headache—child.  Reston (VA): ACR [Internet]. 2012[cited 2015 Jun 25]; 8. Available from: https://acsearch.acr.org/docs/69439/Narrative/
  19. 19. Brain AttACKs Predictors N=1075 18% brought by EMS Symptoms including headache, focal weakness, etc … 29 (3%) medically important diagnosis
  20. 20. Predictors of Abnormal Imaging • “First”, “Worst”, thunderclap, or progressive – Bilateral headache > secondary cause (Masano, 2014) • *Focal motor findings • *Unsteady gait / ataxia • *Altered level of consciousness • *Signs/symptoms of raised ICP • *Hypertension (and tachycardia) • *Young age Massano D, et al. J Pediatr. 2014;165(2):376‐82.
  21. 21. ‘Incidental’ Findings in 10‐20% White Matter Lesions Arachnoid Cysts Chiari 1
  22. 22. ORAL, NASAL SPRAY, OR SC  THERAPY
  23. 23. Network analysis Placebo Acetaminophen IbuprofenZolmitriptan Almotriptan Eletriptan Naratriptan Rizatriptan Sumatriptan Sumatriptan/Naproxen
  24. 24. Approach to abortive therapy • Start with ibuprofen – Ensure right dose, right time – Add metoclopramide 5‐10 mg PO • Consider other NSAID • Consider a triptan – Almotriptan – Sumatriptan + Naproxen sodium – Rizatriptan • Consider infusion 
  25. 25. Drug Tmax (mins) Potency Dose Ibuprofen 45 ++ 10 mg/kg (max 800 mg) Acetaminophen 45-60 ++ 15 mg/kg (max 1000 mg) Naproxen sodium 60 ++ > 12 years: 220 mg or 275 mg (generic); not controlled release Diclofenac potassium (Cambia)* 15-30 +++ > 12 years: 50 mg oral solution (safety and effectiveness not established in pediatrics) Oral analgesics for migraine *Not approved for pediatric patients
  26. 26. Triptans Drug Approval Dose Almotriptan Y (Can1) 6.25 mg or 12.5 mg PO Sumatriptan/naproxe n Y (US1) 10 mg/60 mg PO Rizatriptan Y (US2) 5 mg PO (<40 kg) 10 mg PO (>40 kg) Sumatriptan Y (US) 25-100 mg PO 5 or 20 mg NS 3 or 6 mg SC Zolmitriptan Y (US) 2.5 or 5 mg PO/NS Eletriptan N 20 or 40 mg PO Naratiptan N 1-2.5 mg PO 112‐17 years 26‐17 years
  27. 27. Novel therapies • Calcitonin gene‐related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist  – Better than placebo – Development terminated • Serotonin 5‐HT1F receptor agonist (Lasmiditan, COL‐144)  – Better than placebo • Combined serotonin (5‐HT 1B/1D) receptor agonist and  neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibitor  – Negative phase 2 • Transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV1) receptor  modulators  – Negative phase 2
  28. 28. Novel therapies • Glutamatergic targets  – Ketamine – In development ‐ Tezampanel (LY293558),  BGG492, LY466195, ADX10059 • Propofol 
  29. 29. WHAT NEXT?
  30. 30. Trigeminal Sensitization Early treatment (when pain is mild) most effective Non-selective COX A/B inhibitor may still be effective
  31. 31. Practice variation in Canada • Dopamine  antagonists (39.5%) • metoclopramide  >  prochlorperazine • Fluid bolus (24.3%) • Parenteral NSAIDS  (9.8%) • Significant variation  between sites with  all treatments Richer LP, et al. Pediatrics.  2010;126(1):e150‐5.
  32. 32. Fluid study • Headache relief = VAS decrease > 20 mm • Three (n=3; 6%) returned to the ED in 24 hours Richer L, et al. Headache. 2014;54(9):1496‐505.
  33. 33. • n=62 • All received 10 ml/kg NS bolus over 30 mins • Discharged with naproxen sodium for 24 hours Brousseau DC, Duffy SJ, Anderson AC, Linakis JG. Treatment of pediatric migraine headaches: a randomized, double-blind trial of prochlorperazine versus ketorolac. Ann Emerg Med. 2004 Feb 1;43(2):256–62. Prochlorperazine vs. Ketorolac
  34. 34. Agency for Health Research and Quality. Acute Migraine Treatment in Emergency Settings. 2012; Comparative Effective Review Number 84. Adult data only
  35. 35. Phenothiazine vs. metoclopramide Kelly A-M, Walcynski T, Gunn B. The relative efficacy of phenothiazines for the treatment of acute migraine: a meta-analysis. Headache. 2009 Oct 1;49(9):1324–32. Approximately 15 mm mean difference on VAS  in favor of phenothiazines
  36. 36. Diphenhydramin e Akathisia Rating Scale Objective: 2‐minute seated observation • Inability to remain seated (is the patient  shifting)? • Any semipurposeful or purposeless leg or foot  movements? Subjective: Three questions • Do you feel restless within, or the urge to move,  especially in the legs? • Are you unable to keep your legs still? • Are you unable to remain still, standing or  sitting? Prochlorperazine‐induced akathisia = Change in objective scale ≥1  point + change in subjective scale ≥2 points (from  preprochlorperazine to postprochlor‐ perazine assessment). Vinson DR, Drotts DL. Diphenhydramine for the prevention of akathisia induced by prochlorperazine: a randomized, controlled trial. Ann Emerg Med. 2001 Feb 1;37(2):125– 31.
  37. 37. ED visits in pediatric health centers • 35 pediatric EDs (2009–2012) ‐ 32 124 children with  migraine – 5.5% had a return ED visit within 3 days • Meds ‐ nonopioid analgesics (66%); dopamine antagonists  (50%) – metoclopramide or prochlorperazine;  diphenhydramine (33%); ondansetron (21%); Triptans and  opiate medications (3% each) • Metoclopramide had a 31% increased odds for an ED  revisit within 3 days compared with prochlorperazine – Ondansetron had similar revisit rates to those receiving  dopamine antagonists. • Diphenhydramine with dopamine antagonists was  associated with 27% increased odds of an ED revisit  Bachur RG, et al. Pediatrics. 2015.
  38. 38. Other dopamine antagonists • Droperidol – Butyrophenone – Mean difference in VAS ~ 40 mm – Possible risk of QT prolongation • Chlorpromazine – Associated with increased risk of hospitalization in  one retrospective study
  39. 39. Ketorolac • Survey (n=40) – 78% always or sometimes use ketorolac among  Alberta pediatric ED physicians – 84% of those use it in combination with other  medications • Ketorolac + metoclopramide /  prochlorperazine – Used in 36% of ED presentations in Canada
  40. 40. RCT metoclopramide +/‐ ketorolac • n=53 (8 to 17 years) – n=26 ketorolac; n=27  placebo – no significant  difference • 1/4 mild akathisa • 2/3 had recurrence  of headache Richer et al., not yet published
  41. 41. Dihydroergotamine – side effects • skin reactions (29 percent) and/or local  reactions (22 percent) • sedation (20 percent) • digestive issues (12 percent) • nausea or vomiting (11 percent) • chest symptoms (9 percent) 
  42. 42. Best practice – first line therapy? • Prochlorperazine better than metoclopramide • Consider droperidol if prochlorperazine not  available and metoclopramide not sufficiently  effective – Probable increased risk of side‐effects • Consider combination therapy – Evidence for DHE + neuroleptic/metoclopramide
  43. 43. Propofol • Rapid onset – GABAA receptor potentiation – Na+ channel blocker – Endocannabinoid system • Propofol > dexamethasone  = SC sumatriptan • Risk of addiction • Ongoing pediatric study  (NCT02485418) – IV propofol infusion starting  at 20 mcg/kg/min for 20  minutes, then 30  then 40 Moshtaghion H, et al. Pain practice 2014;  published online July 12. DOI:  10.1111/papr.12230. 
  44. 44. Ketamine • Analgesic and anesthetic properties – antagonist of NMDA glutamate receptor  • Possible treatment of prolonged aura – Blocks cortical spreading depression – Ketamine 25 mg IN vs. Midazolam 2 mg IN – Reduced severity but not duration of aura
  45. 45. Magnesium • Magnesium sulfate 30  mg/kg IV (max 2000 mg) – Infused over 30 min – 1000 mg dose diluted in  50–100 mL of 5% dextrose  water or normal saline  – Cardiorespiratory monitor 
  46. 46. Dexamethasone Colman I, Friedman BW, Brown MD, Innes GD, Grafstein E, Roberts TE, et al. Parenteral dexamethasone for acute severe migraine headache: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials for preventing recurrence. BMJ. 2008 Jun 14;336(7657):1359–61.
  47. 47. Best practice ‐ recurrence • Dexamethasone may reduce headache  recurrence although no data availalbe in  children • Consider dexamethasone 0.5 mg/kg IV (max  25 mg) single dose prior to discharge  especially if known to experience recurrence – Adult studies support IV delivery, but PO  bioavailability is high as well
  48. 48. When to admit? • Partial response in ED • Repeated visits to ED • Dehydration, intractable vomiting • Co‐morbidities – Psychological – Other medical (e.g. hypertension) • Further investigation
  49. 49. Dihydroergotamin e Side Effects Chest pain (more common with sumatriptan), nausea (more common with DHE), drowsiness, flushing, neck stiffness, vertigo, weakness, and injection site reactions • 70% response • repeated dosing may be more effective (IN and IV) • 3 and 6 day protocols • nausea is a limiting SE • sumatriptan SC may be superior initially, but DHE more likely to sustained pain free Kabbouche MA, et al. Headache. 2009;49(1):106‐9.
  50. 50. Best practice ‐ admission • Admission may be associated with better  outcomes when treating chronic daily  headache – Consult other disciplines (e.g. psychiatry) – Hydration and carbohydrate replacement • Consider – Repeated dosing of DHE with neuroleptic /  metoclopramide Marmura MJ and Goldberg SW. Current neurology and neuroscience  reports. 2015;15(4):13.
  51. 51. POST‐TRAUMATIC HEADACHE
  52. 52. ED Treatment of Post‐Traumatic  HA • Avoid medication overuse, light activity,  hydration • Are there migraine characteristics? – Use migraine therapy per local protocol – Case series of sumatriptan or DHE show benefit • Amitriptyline frequently prescribed symptom  reducing treatment Dubrovsky AS, Friedman D, Kocilowicz H. Pediatric post‐traumatic headaches and peripheral nerve  blocks of the scalp: a case series and patient satisfaction survey. Headache. 2014;54(5):878–87.
  53. 53. Dubrovsky AS, Friedman D, Kocilowicz H. Pediatric post‐traumatic headaches and peripheral nerve  blocks of the scalp: a case series and patient satisfaction survey. Headache. 2014;54(5):878–87. • Peripheral nerve block – 71 % reporting immediate relief  – Decrease mean intensity of 93%  – GON + supra‐orbital nerve (SON) in 60% – GON alone in 27% – GON + lesser occipital nerve +/‐ SON in 14%
  54. 54. Summary •Migraine is a complex brain‐based disorder •Treatment of migraine in the ED is highly variable •Neuroleptics (e.g. prochlorperazine) and  combination therapy with DHE are likely most  effective
  55. 55. Acknowledgements D. Johnson, S. Ali, B. Rowe, M. Newton, R.  Rosychuk PERC Women and Children’s Health Research Institute  Innovation Grant and Stollery Children’s Hospital  Foundation Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

×