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Poetry intro basic skills

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Key stage 3

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Poetry intro basic skills

  1. 1. What is a Poem? • A group of words in a pattern? • Lines that rhyme? • A sort of story? • Something that shows a poet’s feelings? • Whatever you want it to be? • Poems come in all shapes and forms, without rhymes as free verse, with rhymes and in verses, following set shapes or syllable patterns
  2. 2. Rhyming Verse Silver Slowly, silently, now the moon Walks the night in her silver shoon; This way, and that, she peers, and sees Silver fruit upon silver trees; One by one the casements catch Her beams among the silvery thatch; Walter de la Mare A Rhyme Scheme shows the pattern of rhymes at the end of lines. Every sound is labelled with a letter, starting with ‘a’. A A B B C C
  3. 3. Free Verse Our street is dead lazy especially in winter. Some mornings you wake up and it’s still lying there Saying nothing. Huddled under its white counterpane. Roger McGough Free Verse doesn’t follow any patterns. The street is described like a person so this technique is called ‘personification’
  4. 4. List Poem What is White? This could also be called a metaphor poem! White is a dove And lily of the valley And a puddle of milk Spilled in an alley A ship’s sail A kite’s tail A wedding veil Mary O’Neil
  5. 5. Haiku The snow blankets all Transforming to still beauty, Dazzling purity (Three lines with 17 syllables in all 5, 7, 5)
  6. 6. Can you remember what techniques this poem uses? Slowly, silently, now the moon Walks the night in her silver shoon; This way, and that, she peers, and sees Silver fruit upon silver trees; One by one the casements catch Her beams among the silvery thatch;
  7. 7. Can you remember what techniques this poem uses? Our street is dead lazy especially in winter. Some mornings you wake up and it’s still lying there Saying nothing. Huddled under its white counterpane.
  8. 8. Can you remember what techniques this poem uses? White is a dove And lily of the valley And a puddle of milk Spilled in an alley A ship’s sail A kite’s tail A wedding veil
  9. 9. The snow blankets all Transforming to still beauty, Dazzling purity
  10. 10. LO: Recognising a range of poetic techniques Onomatopoeia Song Onomatopoeia is the hard spelling for an easy thing: sound words! The Washing Machine It goes fwunke then slunkey as the washing goes around. The water spluncheses, and it sluncheses, as the washing goes around. As you pick it up it splocheses, and it flocheses, as the washing goes around. But at the end it schlopperies, and then it flopperies as the washing stops going around. By Jeffrey Davies Onomatopoeia words Try writing down a word (or two representing the sounds made by each of the following: a) someone walking on a sheet of corrugated iron b) a vacuum-cleaner sucking up the dirt c) a fisherman throwing out his rod d) someone trying to start a car which has a flat battery e) chalk on a blackboard f) sausages cooking in a pan g) someone walking through thick mud h) a fire burning briskly i) a kettle boiling
  11. 11. Alliteration is the repetition of consonant letters Name Verb Noun Adverb Emma eats eggs enthusiastically David dances disco dramatically Gary gives gifts generously
  12. 12. LO: Distinguishing between similes and metaphors Similes and Metaphors in Music
  13. 13. Similes and Metaphors A simile is a comparison where something is compared to something else, using ‘as’ or ‘like’. e.g. feet like flippers neck like a giraffe
  14. 14. Winter Morning Snowflakes for breakfast. The street outside quiet as a long white bandage. Roger McGough
  15. 15. The Beach The beach is a quarter of golden fruit a soft ripe melon sliced to a thick green rind of jungle growth, and the sea devours it with its sharp sharp white teeth. William Hart-smith
  16. 16. Object Similarity Comparison Snow Colour A bandage Covers what is usually there. Muffles sound like a gag ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Object Similarity Comparison A beach A soft ripe melon The sea Sharp white teeth
  17. 17. Task 1: Kinaesthetic Task S for SIT = Simile M for Move = Metaphor A) Fame is a dream that fades in the morning B) Lady Gaga is as mad as a hatter C) Love is like someone is squeezing your heart D) Fame is X Factor on a Saturday night E) Winning is a spotlight which blinds you to everything else F) Kate Moss is as thin as a rake G) Peter Andre is as dull as ditch water H) Life is like a box of chocolates
  18. 18. Personification is where you describe some ‘thing’ as alive (like a person or animal’) The wind stood up and shook his hair and flailed his arms and grabbed at leaves Clue: Personification uses verbs which can only be performed by people are animals.
  19. 19. Task : Copy out the following grid and categorise the metaphors and similes, putting them in the correct column. •A motorbike snarls •like a thunderbolt he falls •the skin cracks like a pod •apple-green dress •struggling like a man on fire •the wind whips seagulls from the sky •cotton wool clouds •slashed clouds leak gold •the dandelion stem bleeds milk •sharp petals like metal shreds like a bull in a china shop •ghosts of sunshine •A classroom is like a beehive •The classroom was a bomb site •The beach is a quarter of melon •As quick as a flash •Peacock blue •Forest green Similes Metaphors Personification
  20. 20. • Remember similes, metaphors and personification
  21. 21. LO: Demonstrating an understanding of metaphors The Beach The beach is a quarter of golden fruit A soft ripe melon Sliced to a half -moon curve Having a thick green rind Of jungle growth; And the sea devours it With its sharp teeth William Hart-Smith Task 1: What is the beach being compared to? Task 2: Write out and change the poems so that it includes similes (‘like’ or ‘as’ instead of metaphors) e.g. The beach is like a quarter of golden fruit… Task 3: Read the following and fill in the blanks A Baby A story that hasn’t been written A journey that hasn’t … A … that hasn’t been learnt A … that hasn’t been sung A picture that … Task 4: Describe the following pictures using a metaphor A crane is a … A butterfly is a …
  22. 22. Task 1) Read the following poem extracts and write down your guess what the theme of the poem is. In Praise of Ironing It has to be loved the way a laundress loves her linens, the way she moves her hands caressing the fine muslins knowing their warp and woof, VAD
  23. 23. It has to be loved as if it were embroidered with flowers and birds and two joined hearts upon it. It has to be stretched and stroked. It has to be celebrated. VAD
  24. 24. Archangels then will attend to its metals and polish the rods of its rain. Seraphim will stop singing hosannas to shower it with blessings and blisses and praises and, newly in love, we must draw it and paint it, our pencils and brushes and loving caresses smoothing the holy surfaces. VAD
  25. 25. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BrTsZmxFC5I In Praise of Ironing It has to be loved the way a laundress loves her linens, the way she moves her hands caressing the fine muslins knowing their warp and woof, like a lover coaxing, or a mother praising. It has to be loved as if it were embroidered with flowers and birds and two joined hearts upon it. It has to be stretched and stroked. It has to be celebrated. O this great beloved world and all the creatures in it. It has to be spread out, the skin of this planet. The trees must be washed, and the grasses and mosses. They have to be polished as if made of green brass. The rivers and little streams with their hidden cresses and pale-coloured pebbles and their fool’s gold must be washed and starched or shined into brightness, the sheets of lake water smoothed with the hand and the foam of the oceans pressed into neatness. It has to be ironed, the sea in its whiteness and pleated and goffered, the flower-blue sea, the protean, wine-dark, grey, green sea with its metres of satin and bolts of brocade. And sky- such an O! overhead- night and day must be burnished and rubbed by hands that are loving so the blue blazons forth and the stars keep on shining within and above and the hands keep on moving. It has to be made bright, the skin of this planet, till it shines in the sun like gold leaf. Archangels then will attend to its metals and polish the rods of its rain. Seraphim will stop singing hosannas to shower it with blessings and blisses and praises and, newly in love, we must draw it and paint it, our pencils and brushes and loving caresses smoothing the holy surfaces. Pablo Neruda VAD
  26. 26. The poem is what we call an extended metaphor, where we compare something to something else. ( but don’t use ‘like’ or ‘as’ with a theme. The poet has used a mix of ordinary and extraordinary images to tell us how important the world is to her. Her them starts with laundry and ends with angels! Task 2) List at least 5 things the poet compares parts of the Earth to. VAD
  27. 27. PLANET EARTH It has to be spread out, the skin of this planet, has to be ironed, the sea in its whiteness; and the hands keep on moving, smoothing the holy surfaces. P.K. PAGE You are going to produce a short poem which uses an extended metaphor. VAD Remember , a metaphor is a direct comparison without ‘as’ or ‘like’. You are going to produce your own extended metaphor poem about your life.
  28. 28. AN Extended Metaphor Poem e.g. I think life is a box of chocolates A baby born is the excitement of the present… Careful NOT to use LIKE or AS Look at the next slide to see how to set it out VAD
  29. 29. Task 3) Produce a Venn Diagram to help you. Choose a idea and plan it out like the following e.g. VAD Extended Metaphor Theme = Pacman Pacman is computer games where you have you eat as many power pellets as possible, and avoid the ghosts chasing you. The chase = pursuit of knowledge Power pellets = knowledge Ghosts = the obstacles in your school life Success = conquering your demons, the ghosts How are they similar? Life can be compared to a computer games because there are obstacles to overcome
  30. 30. How are they similar? VAD Extended Theme = Metaphor
  31. 31. LO: Explore how poets use personification Personification in songs Personification is where a thing is given a person’s (human) characteristics. The easiest way to spot it is look at the verbs (doing words). Do they sound like something a person could do! Verbs! The wind whistles The wind moans The clouds scurried The shadows crept
  32. 32. Winter snuggled round the warm houses his eyes seeing; envying the warm interiors thinking of his cold being Winter sharpened the huge icicles pointing at the ground; tending each one carefully he didn’t make a sound Winter shuffled through the streets turning left and right; chilling houses on his route all throughout the night
  33. 33. City Jungle Rain splinters town. Lizard cars cruise by; their radiators grin. Thin headlights stare – shop doorways keep their mouths shut. At the roadside hunched houses cough. Newspapers shuffle by, hands in their pockets. The gutter gargles. A motorbike snarls; Dustbins flinch. Streetlights bare their yellow teeth. The motorway’s cat-black tongue lashes across the glistening back of the tarmac night. Pie Corbett 1. Go through and find the verbs in the poem. Write them in your book. 2. Put a tick or cross next to them, deciding whether they are something a person could do (tick) or not (x). 3. Look back at where the verb appears in the poem. Next decide are they part of a personification image. Put a ‘P’ if they are.
  34. 34. He clasps the crag with crooked hands; Close to the sun in lonely lands, Ringed with the azure world he stands. The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls; He watches from his mountain walls, And like a thunderbolt he falls. Lord Tennyson (a crag is a sharp bit of rock on a cliff) (azure is bright blue)
  35. 35. LO: Appreciating the use of enjambment Enjambment is where the meaning of the line runs on to the next. e.g. The river slows, lazy Oozing Rippling Burbling The river runs, angry Sliding, spitting, slithering. Draws attention to the rhythm/ pace of the poem watch from 9mins 25
  36. 36. And then nothing but silence. Draws attention to a specific moment or idea.
  37. 37. The Red Wheelbarrow so much depends upon a red wheel barrow glazed with rain water beside the white chickens William Carlos Williams is famous for very short, simple poems that force the reader to look at and think about things they may not otherwise, notice. 1) Is this a poem? If not, why not? 2) What word or phrase draws your attention to the significance of the wheelbarrow? 3) The enjambment makes you stop and notice, what, in particular? 4) What could the colours, ideas, or objects in the poem symbolize? (They may not – the poem may just be designed to make you imagine the scene like a photo in your head. What do you think?) Here are two other poems by Williams but the new lines, punctuation and enjambment have been left out. Re-write them using enjambment. 5) As the cat climbed over the top of the jamcloset first the right forefoot carefully then the hind stepped down into the pit of the empty flowerpot 6) The worm emerged at the foot of the path its clammy pale tailbody flaccid in the new rain exhausted by the tunnelling basking in the rank wetness and its triumph 7) Write your own enjambment poem – maybe a river, dramatic incident or detailed scene.
  38. 38. Lo: Appreciating Sensual Imagery There are 5 senses and poets use them to make a poem seem more vibrant (active/ alive). Make small, QUICK (5 mins) sketches of the 5 senses in a column on the left hand side of your page. Leave at least 5 lines between your drawings. Whilst you are sketching listen to the poem ‘Mrs Tilscher’s class’ which is all about a ‘rite of passage’; what we call a significant change in your life, usually associated with growing up. Mrs Tilscher's Class
  39. 39. 1. This poem is full of sensual imagery. Find any phrase which appeals to the 5 senses and write it down next to your senses sketch. Can you find one for every sense? In Mrs Tilscher’s Class You could travel up the Blue Nile with your finger, tracing the route while Mrs Tilscher chanted the scenery. Tana. Ethiopia. Khartoum. Aswan. That for an hour, then a skittle of milk and the chalky Pyramids rubbed into dust. A window opened with a long pole. The laugh of a bell swung by a running child. This was better than home. Enthralling books. The classroom glowed like a sweetshop. Sugar paper. Coloured shapes. Brady and Hindley faded, like the faint, uneasy smudge of a mistake. Mrs Tilscher loved you. Some mornings, you found she'd left a gold star by your name. The scent of a pencil slowly, carefully, shaved. A xylophone's nonsense heard from another form. Over the Easter term the inky tadpoles Changed from commas into exclamation marks. Three frogs hopped in the playground, freed by a dunce, followed by a line of kids, jumping and croaking away from the lunch queue. A rough boy told you how you were born. You kicked him, but stared at your parents, appalled, when you got back home. That feverish July, the air tasted of electricity. A tangible alarm made you always untidy, hot, fractious under the heavy, sexy sky. You asked her how you were born and Mrs Tilscher smiled, then turned away. Reports were handed out. You ran through the gates, impatient to be grown, as the sky split open into a thunderstorm.
  40. 40. I ask them to take a poem and hold it up to the light like a colour slide or press an ear against its hive. I say drop a mouse into a poem and watch him probe his way out, or walk inside a poem’s room and feel the wall for a light switch. I want them to waterski across the surface of a poem waving at the author’s name on the shore. But all they want to do is tie a poem to a chair with a rope and torture a confession out of it. They begin beating it with a hose To find out what really means. (Billy Collins) Add more lines to your senses sketches 1. What is the poem about? 2. How does the poet encourage us to use our senses? 3. Who do you think the ‘I’ and ‘them’ supposed to be? 4. Identify as many similes and metaphors as you can. What is the meaning and effect of the best one? 5. How does the poet encourage us to use our senses? 6. Look at the line changes. Find one which you think is particularly important or effective and explain why you think the poet has changed lines at this point.
  41. 41. What do these pictures all have in common? Why has this object come to symbolize evil and temptation? Why does a tree often symbolise schools? Or universities?
  42. 42. LO: Appreciating Symbolism A symbol is an image, object, etc that represents itself but also a more complicated idea. We ‘expect’ a connection from certain images.
  43. 43. Quickly sketch and label 5 of the following symbols and explain how they have a deeper meaning
  44. 44. LO: Recognising Symbolism in Poetry A symbol is something (e.g. an object, colour, idea) which stands for something else. = Sunny Happy 1. A dove symbolizes _______. 2. A heart symbolizes _______. 3. A star symbolizes ______. 4. A tick symbolizes _______. 5. The colour red______. Come up with 3 more common symbols.
  45. 45. These images or ideas are suggested in the poem you are going to look at.
  46. 46. When my mother died I was very young, And my father sold me while yet my tongue Could scarcely cry " 'weep! 'weep! 'weep! 'weep!" So your chimneys I sweep & in soot I sleep. There's little Tom Dacre, who cried when his head, That curl'd llke a lamb's back. was shav'd: so I said "Hush. Tom! never mind it, for when your head's bare You know that the soot cannot spoil your white hair." And so he was quiet & that very night, As Tom was a-sleeping, he had such a sight! That thousands of sweepers, Dick, Joe, Ned or Jack. Were all of them lock'd up in coffins of black. And by came an Angel who had a bright key, And he open'd the coffins & set them all free; Then down a green plain leaping, laughing, they run, And wash in a river. and shine in the Sun. Then naked & white, all their bags left behind, They rise upon clouds and sport in the wind; And the Angel told Tom, if he'd be a good boy, He'd have God for his father & never want joy. And so Tom awoke; and we rose in the dark. And got with our bags & our brushes to work. Tho' the morning was cold, Tom was happy & warm; So if all do their duty they need not fear harm. The Chimney Sweeper
  47. 47. Symbol/ metaphor poem White is a dove and lily of the valley A clean , fresh milk bottle left in an alley The family’s delight at a ship’s sail The bride’s look at her wedding veil. Write your own symbol/ metaphor poem e.g. Black is… Red is… Love is…
  48. 48. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KgUQM9gO-8Q Poetic techniques scramble 1. ionalerlitat 2. Naesncoas 3. Onte 4. Mooatoeiaonp 5. Yeraimg 6. Anzsta 7. Bammneenjt 8. emtaorph 9. ancilsibe 10. mtehe 11. rmehy 12. ctrustreru 13. emilsi
  49. 49. LO: Demonstrating your understanding of poetic techniques Onomatopoeia is a word or words that sound like the action: snap, zip, bang, whisper, slither, buzz etc. Alliteration – repetition of letters at the beginning of a series of words. e.g. she slid and slithered Assonance – repeated vowel sounds. “The teasy bees take their honeyed ease.”
  50. 50. A) Slowly, silently, now the moon Walks the night in her silver shoon; This way, and that, she peers, and sees Silver fruit upon silver trees; One by one the casements catch Her beams among the silvery thatch; B) Our street is dead lazy especially in winter. Some mornings you wake up and it’s still lying there Saying nothing. Huddled under its white counterpane. Poem c) White is a dove And lily of the valley And a puddle of milk Spilled in an alley A ship’s sail A kite’s tail A wedding veil
  51. 51. a) Crashing through the darkness the booming hills b) ‘you change your mind like a girl, changes clothes’ c) Six feet screams and no-one seems to hear a thing d) Tyger, tyger! Burning bright/ in the forests of the night f) And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain g) A host of golden daffodils,/ Beside the lake, beneath the trees/ Fluttering and dancing in the breeze h) He was my North, my South, My East and West, My Working week and my Sunday rest i) I walk this lonely street On the Boulvard of Broken Dreams When the city sleeps
  52. 52. Poetry requires only courage enough to leap from the edge and trust. It requires that you Close your eyes And imagine Emerald greens and blood reds. That you smell That jungle growth Or dreary gutter. That you make the connection between that colour and how it makes you feel: that song, that image of hope, of peace, of anger. It’s not all counting lines Or seeing signs Or rhyming words Or what you heard. It’s about YOU. How YOU respond. How YOU feel. What You can ‘see’. Poetry is as individual as you are . Read it and EXPERIENCE. V. Mann The Poetry Experience 1. How does the poet use enjambment to grab your attention in the first stanza? 2. Find some examples of metaphors in the second stanza and why does she use them? 3. What sensual images is she using in the second and third stanzas? 4. What examples does she give about symbolism? 5. How doe s she poke fun at some people’s misconceptions and prejudices about poetry in stanza 5? 6. How doe she make the reader feel involved in stanza 6? 7. What is her ‘message’? 8. Produce 3 PEE statements about how she uses poetic techniques?
  53. 53. Produce a: Guide to poetic terms for year 6 Or A poster presentation on poetry Or A powerpoint / youtube presentation
  54. 54. LO: How to comment effectively on poems using PEE statements Aims • All pupils need to have completed PEE statements on a familiar poem. • Some pupils will respond to an unseen poem with simple PEE Statements. • Extension : Some pupils will extend their analysis with further analysis with a P E E E statement.
  55. 55. LO: How to comment effectively on poems using PEE statements The poet (or use their name) • uses • Describes • Emphasizes • draws a picture • Illustrates • employs • highlights • portrays • evokes Useful vocabulary for PEE statements • Shows • Presents • Exposes • Reveals • Defines • Makes clear
  56. 56. City Jungle Rain splinters town. Lizard cars cruise by; their radiators grin. Thin headlights stare – shop doorways keep their mouths shut. At the roadside hunched houses cough. Newspapers shuffle by, hands in their pockets. The gutter gargles. A motorbike snarls; Dustbins flinch. Streetlights bare their yellow teeth. The motorway’s cat-black tongue lashes across the glistening back of the tarmac night. Pie Corbett He clasps the crag with crooked hands; Close to the sun in lonely lands, Ringed with the azure world he stands. The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls; He watches from his mountain walls, And like a thunderbolt he falls. Lord Tennyson
  57. 57. Point Evidence Explanation Point Evidence Explanation
  58. 58. Point Evidence Explanation
  59. 59. City Jungle Rain splinters town. Lizard cars cruise by; their radiators grin. Thin headlights stare – shop doorways keep their mouths shut. At the roadside hunched houses cough. Newspapers shuffle by, hands in their pockets. The gutter gargles. A motorbike snarls; Dustbins flinch. Streetlights bare their yellow teeth. The motorway’s cat-black tongue lashes across the glistening back of the tarmac night. Pie Corbett Explain in a PEE Statement how the poet uses: • Personification • Onomatopoeia • Metaphors In the poem ‘ City Jungle’, the poet uses… The poem ‘City Jungle’ is described using… Corbet evokes the atmosphere of the city by… Corbet creates a picture in your mind’s eyes of a dangerous place by using… See the next slide if you’re stuck for ideas
  60. 60. Corbet evokes the dangerous atmosphere of the city streets at night by using personification. The cars are described as ‘lizards’ with grinning radiators. This creates an unusual image in our imagination of a monstrous cross between a scaled creature and a car which grabs our attention. We forget how dangerous cars can be , and this threatening image establishes the wild and dangerous atmosphere suggested by the tile ‘City Jungle’. Point Evidence Explanation Extension
  61. 61. • Explain in a PEE Statement how the poet uses: • Alliteration • Metaphors • Similes He clasps the crag with crooked hands; Close to the sun in lonely lands, Ringed with the azure world he stands. The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls; He watches from his mountain walls, And like a thunderbolt he falls. Lord Tennyson
  62. 62. LO: Appreciating how tone can affect the reading of a poem Tone is the term used to describe the emotional atmosphere that is created by a piece of writing. As you cannot usually hear the writer’s tone of voice, tone comes from the kind of language used, and the way the poem is structured. Task 1: Write down any of the following vocabulary which you would expect to describe a poem about a kite. playful happy mocking sad romantic assertive cynical serious sarcastic light-hearted bitter soothing aggressive conversational humorous confident calm intimate solemn Dramatic gloomy nostalgic heavy religious
  63. 63. Kites are often used as similes and metaphors. Read the following famous quotations about kites. “The optimist pleasantly ponders how high his kite will fly; the pessimist woefully wonders how soon his kite will fall.” I went to the park and saw this kid flying a kite. The kid was really excited. I don't know why. That's what they're supposed to do. Now if he had had a chair on the other end of that string, I would have been impressed. “True courage is like a kite; a contrary wind raises it higher.” Imagination is the highest kite one can fly "You can't fly a kite unless you go against the wind and have a weight to keep it from turning a somersault. The same with man. No man will succeed unless he is ready to face and overcome difficulties and is prepared to assume responsibilities." Write down two similes. Write down one metaphor. Kites are often used to represent other ideas in life. Read the poems and be prepared to explain what the quotes are trying to represent.
  64. 64. Task 3: Now you’ve seen what kites can represent, add some ideas to a spidergram in your books. Freedom childhood Adversity Task 4: Listen to the reading of a poem entitled ‘A kite is a victim’ and write down any other words which could be used to describe its tone. (Look back at the previous slide for vocabulary). A kite is a ...
  65. 65. A kite is a victim you are sure of. You love it because it pulls gentle enough to call you master, strong enough to call you fool; because it lives like a desperate trained falcon in the high sweet air, and you can always haul it down to tame it in your drawer. A kite is a fish you have already caught in a pool where no fish come, so you play him carefully and long, and hope he won’t give up, or the wind die down. A kite is the last poem you’ve written so you give it to the wind, but you don’t let it go until someone finds you something else to do. A kite is a contract of glory that must be made with the sun, so you make friends with the field the river and the wind, then you pray the whole cold night before, under the travelling cordless moon, to make you worthy and lyric and pure. (Leonard Cohen) • Choose a quotation from each stanza of the poem which you could use in a PEE Statement. • Draw a sketch to illustrate it.
  66. 66. LO: Using quotations to illustrate your understanding of a poem In the first stanza of the poem, Cohen uses a simile to describe the kite, describing it as living ‘like a desperate, trained falcon in the high sweet air.’ This negative image creates a melancholy tone for the reader, as the image of a naturally impressive and powerful bird such as a falcon being ‘trained’ can be regarded as a deeply depressing image. The quotation also places the blame for this unpleasant image firmly onto humanity as we are the only ones capable of training and constricting the freedom of such a bird. The use of the word ‘desperate’ adds to this sense of helplessness. The effect of this is highlighted by the contrasting images of the ‘desperate , trained falcon’ and the more positive ‘high sweet air.’ The quotation can be seen as part of an extended metaphor for relationships, particularly focussing on the idea that in a relationships one person may like to control the other, and that what may seem like a positive image of freedom, may on closer inspection, just be restricting form of control. Point Evidence Explanation Extra Analysis Write a PEE statement paragraph for each of the quotations you chose.
  67. 67. Task 5 Write a 50 word summary of the poem. You must use 3 of the following words: • Control relationships • Freedom constriction • Metaphor power
  68. 68. ‘Island Man’ LO: Recognise how colour and imagery are used in ‘Island Man’
  69. 69. Look at the following images and think about the title of the poem. What is appealing / positive about the island?these images?
  70. 70. What is appealing / positive about the images here?
  71. 71. “Island Man” – Grace Nichols Morning muffling muffling and island man wakes up his crumpled pillow waves To the sound of blue surf island man heaves himself In his head The steady breaking and wombing Another London day. Wild seabirds And fishermen pushing out to sea The sun surfacing defiantly From the east Of his small emerald island He always comes back Groggily groggily Comes back to sands Of a grey metallic soar to surge of wheels To dull North Circular roar Island man
  72. 72. Caribbean London First impressions Lush Fertile Oppressive polluted Positive words Negative words
  73. 73. Morning muffling muffling and island man wakes up his crumpled pillow waves To the sound of blue surf island man heaves himself In his head The steady breaking and wombing Another London day. Wild seabirds And fishermen pushing out to sea The sun surfacing defiantly From the east Of his small emerald island He always comes back Groggily groggily Comes back to sands Of a grey metallic soar to surge of wheels To dull North Circular roar 1. What colours are associated with his ‘island’? What colours are associated with London? 2. The Island Man is dreaming and wakes up. What has he dreaming about.? What did he imagine the sound of London traffic was? 3. How has enjambment been used in stanza 1? 4. The poem has an unusual setting out where the lines look as though they are pulling the ‘Island Man’ apart. Why does he feel ‘torn’? 5. Womb is where a baby develops. What is the symbolism of this word being used? What do you associate with the word? Which place is it associated with? 6. Find an example of alliteration in the poem. 7. Find an example of personification.
  74. 74. ‘Island Man’ is a poem written by Grace Nichols. It is about a man who wakes up from a dream about his ______1__________. His home is made to sound beautiful by the use of ‘emerald island’ which is an example of a ____2___. Also, to make it sound peaceful, Grace Nichols uses unusual onomatopoeia such as _____3____ . She also uses ____4____ like the “sun surfacing’ to draw attention to the beautiful sunrise. During the poem, the man wakes up. This is shown using onomatopoeia “____5_______”.There is also repetition to show just how tired the speaker is. When the man wakes, it is made to seem a dream and the reality is London which is described with colours such as _____6_______to make the city seem dark and dismal. It is also noisy, we know this because the traffic of the North Circular is described as a “_________7________”. The man is made to seem very unhappy about waking in London as he “_________8___________” himself out of bed.
  75. 75. ‘Island Man’ is a poem written by Grace Nichols. It is about a man who wakes up from a dream about his beautiful Caribbean island. His home is made to sound beautiful by the use of ‘emerald island’ which is an example of a metaphor. Also, to make it sound peaceful, Grace Nichols uses unusual onomatopoeia such as wombing . She also uses alliteration like the “sun surfacing’ to draw attention to the beautiful sunrise. During the poem, the man wakes up. This is shown using onomatopoeia ‘groggily, groggily’ .There is also repetition to show just how tired the speaker is. When the man wakes, it is made to seem a dream and the reality is London which is described with colours such as ’grey’ to make the city seem dark and dismal. It is also noisy, we know this because the traffic of the North Circular is described as a “roar”. The man is made to seem very unhappy about waking in London as he “heaves” himself out of bed.
  76. 76. The alliteration “___1_________________” makes the poem sound ______2________. The ‘s’ sounds sound like the ________3_________ lapping the shore. The onomatopoeia that is used is “______4______________” makes the man sound really ________5_______and slow to show the man isn’t enthusiastic about his day in London. This is also an example of repetition to show how ____________6_____________ the Island Man is. tired waves peaceful tired groggily groggily sun surfacing Level 5c and below Copy out and fill in Level 5b and above. Come up with your own PEE statements about how the poet uses language
  77. 77. Writing using PEE Statements Mini-Assessment In ‘Island Man’ , Grace Nichols uses language to show how much the speaker misses his island. When describing the island, she uses the words ‘his small emerald islnnd’. The use of the possessive pronoun ‘his’, shows that he still feels he belongs to the island; and that it belongs to him. He feels a sense of wonership towards it which shows how much he loved it there. The word ‘emerald’ has a number of connotations. It creates a picture in the mind of the reader of how luch, green and verdant the island is . It also …. Continue with a mini- assessment where you use at least 3 PEE paragraphs.
  78. 78. LO: Reviewing My Progress This is an honest review of how I think I have worked: • Effort /10 • Attainment /10 • Equipment /10 • Homework /10 • Listening Skills /10 • Organisation /10 Look through your work (BOTH books and your homework) and write out the targets you have been given. My target is ________ I will do this by ___ Spellings I will keep a spelling diary at the back of my exercise book and learn frequent spelling mistakes I will try and use a thesaurus, dictionary or a more sophisticated or unusual word to widen my vocabulary. Sentence Starters: Proof read my work to check for different sentence beginnings Imagery/ Description: Try to use powerful adjectives, and original similes and metaphors Sentence punctuation: I need to proof read my work and look for pauses to put in full stops and/or commas Punctuation for speech: I need to look in my book for rules for speech Paragraphs: I need to check that I have a new paragraph for a : • new time • new place • new idea • new speaker I need to put NP and // where they should be
  79. 79. Onomatopoeia is a word or words that sound like the action: snap, zip, bang, whisper, slither, buzz etc. Alliteration – repetition of letters or phases at the beginning of a series of words. Assonance – repeated vowel sounds. “The teasy bees take their honeyed ease.” Repetition – using the same word or phrase more than once. “Into the deep, deep ocean.” M Rathor Chapel-en-le-Frith High
  80. 80. You are going to write an argument using speech marks in your English books. Here is what your argument needs to be about: REMEMBER TO USE SPEECH MARKS WHEN SOMEONE IS TALKING!!! 1. Alice and James are cross with each other. 2. Alice thinks that James stole her pen 3. James is cross because Alice has accused him of this. 4. James did not steal the pen. 5. Alice doesn’t believe James. 6. She tells him she thinks he is a thief. 7. He tries to explain that he didn’t take it. 8. She insists that he did. 9. He tells her to look in her pencil case again. 10. She asks him why she should. 11. He tells her to do it. 12. She looks in her pencil case. 13. She finds it. 14. She tells James that she is sorry. 15. He says that he’s upset because she didn’t believe him
  81. 81. Using Similes and Metaphors to Describe
  82. 82. Alice falls down the rabbit hole into a wonderful adventure. a)You are going to describe 3 main characters, using similes and metaphors. b) You are then going to use the skills you have revised, to write your own description of ‘Wonderland’
  83. 83. Hair as red as __ His face was ____ white The leather of his hat looked like ____________ Eyebrows like _________ A cravat (tie) with colours like ____ Long fingernails like ______
  84. 84. A head the shape of a ___ Hair as red as ___ Skin as white as _______ Eyeshadow as blue as the _____ Jewels which twinkled like ________
  85. 85. Teeth like a row of ______ Eyes As green as ______ Stripes which looked like _____ A smile as wide as a ______
  86. 86. Describe the strange world Alice finds herself in. Try to use similes and metaphors. Once you have finished, design a poster for display.
  87. 87. Skills
  88. 88. Concrete poems • The term "concrete," in reference to a poetic form, implies that there is something tangible or solid for the reader to observe. Concrete poetry is considered a work of graphic art because it relies upon a visual, more than a traditional auditory, mode of presentation. The meaning of a concrete poem is difficult to grasp without viewing its arrangement on paper because concrete poems are a hybrid of literary and visual art.5 For instance, the gentle fall of rain could be effectively depicted in a concrete poem as words sprinkling across the page in the shape of raindrops. • • A concrete poem is a poem that forms a picture of the topic or follows the contours of a shape that is suggested by the topic. • • Concrete poetry involves arranging the letters or words that describe an object into a visual image that also describes the object. It is a kind of painting with letters or words as the medium.
  89. 89. Now finish off the story. It’s up to you what happens! Verbs: asked shouted screamed yelled bellowed cried demanded answered replied apologised said Adverbs: quietly loudly slowly regretfully tearfully happily angrily

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