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Who's Your Daddy?: What Marketers Need to Know About Today’s Dad

It’s no secret, marketers are obsessed with moms. For years, moms were seen as the primary shoppers in the house, but a new study from Y&R shows that may not be the case anymore.

Compiling the views of more than 8,000 North American dads, the “Who's Your Daddy?” study reveals how they feel about comparison shopping, finding deals, and using tech to shop.

Download the report at www.yr.com/dadstudy

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Who's Your Daddy?: What Marketers Need to Know About Today’s Dad

  1. 1. NO NAME IS NONSENSE 48% Compared to 35% of moms, 48% of dads consider themselves to be loyal to brand name products. 29% 29% of dads think that no-name products are made by the same companies as the big labels (compared to 44% of moms think they're all made at the same place). PUTTING HIS BEST FACE FORWARD 75% are often trying to lose weight. 62% consider themselves an authority/expert when it comes to beauty products and personal care. 76% believe that natural care and beauty products are less effective. 34% would switch personal care/beauty products if they found a similar product with less packaging. What Marketers Need to Know About Today’s Dad Who’s Your Daddy? It’s no secret, marketers are obsessed with moms. For years, moms were seen as the primary shoppers in the house, but a new study from Y&R shows that may not be the case anymore. Compiling the views of more than 8,000 North American dads, the “Who's Your Daddy?” study reveals how they feel about comparison shopping, finding deals, and using tech to shop. Priorities naturally shift when kids enter the picture, and heightened emotions and responsibilities alter the male buyer’s decision process. As a result, it’s critical for brands to recognize this pivotal change in a man’s life and to treat dad as a distinct subsection of the male demographic. Millennial Dads claim primary or shared grocery shopping, make their own choices, not just going by mom's list, not just following orders. 80% are mainly responsible for planning play dates and other activities with their kids outside the home, as opposed to 23% of dads over the age of 35. 49% More likely to claim primary or shared responsibility for everyday parenting tasks, and spend more average time with kids than older dads (34+) BRINGING HOME THE BACON & COOKING IT, TOO 84% would rather look for healthier versions than cut out indulgent food. 63% of dads (and 69% of moms) think that shopping for food products is a time to explore and learn about what's available. 45% more likely to pick up ready-to-eat meals from grocery stores than moms (33%). 30% consider themselves to be somewhat of an authority or expert when it comes to food. 68% of dads (and 65% of moms) say they are willing to pay more for organic products. DAD IS NOT A DEAL SEEKER 48% say it's not worth their time to shop around for the lowest prices. 59 % say going to the counter with coupons looks cheap. Compared to 52% of moms, only 33% of dads try to buy items on sale. 28% of dads - but only 13% of moms - say they don't worry much about price and buy the brands they think are the best. 49% of dads agree that the convenience of one-stop shopping is more appealing than the lowest price, compared to 32% of moms. 57% say that clipping coupons is too much trouble. 85% say they often make impulse purchases when shopping at the grocery or drug store. In 2014, Dad spent more than Mom on back-to-school items, shelling out an average of $963.27, compared to $717.32 for moms. BACK-TO-SCHOOL 55% of Dads own a tablet. say they would take action on a mobile offer. 58% Digital Dad Brands Worth Big Bucks American Dads like Daring, Distinguished, & Energetic Brands Dad Strength: Taking Health Seriously 55% say they buy health products on impulse - often because they are feeling sick. 97% feel they are in control of their future health, but 64% also say they believe a lot of their health problems will be/are hereditary. 46% look for foods that can reduce the risk of health issues. 95% say they try to make healthier choices. WHAT’S WORTH SPLURGING ON? HIGHEST VALUED BRANDS IN THE U.S. DADS BOTH MEN WITHOUT KIDS THE IMPORTANT THINGS IN LIFE MEN WITHOUT KIDS DADS TOP 10 VALUES Loyalty Family Success Responsibility Wisdom Sexuality Courtesy Honesty Happiness Confidence Loyalty Success Responsibility Justice Courtesy Equality Authenticity Honesty Happiness Wisdom

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