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Presentation skills, Public speaking and body language

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Presentation skills, Public speaking and body language

This presentation elaborates various theories and methods that can be used in order to enhance the presentation skills, public speaking skills and having a deeper understanding of body languages

This presentation elaborates various theories and methods that can be used in order to enhance the presentation skills, public speaking skills and having a deeper understanding of body languages

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Presentation skills, Public speaking and body language

  1. 1. Presentation skills, Public speaking and Body language BY: YASH AGRAWAL
  2. 2. Things to learn • Presentation skills 1. Introduction 2. Elements of presentation 3. 4 P’s of Presentation 4. Iceberg Theory • Public Speaking 1. Elements of public speaking 2. Steps of Public Speaking
  3. 3. Things to learn • Body Language 1. Introduction 2. Reading Body Language 3. Making a positive impression 4. Negative gestures 5. Mehrabian Circle • Conclusion
  4. 4. Presentation Skills It is a process of processing the content of the topic to an audience consisting one or more persons. It utilizes some visual aid. “A successful presentation needs to be both buttoned up (orderly) and free-flowing (a conversation). The tension between the two, the fact that both things are happening at once, defines the process.” ― Dale Ludwig and Greg Owen-Boger
  5. 5. Elements of Presentation The essential elements of a presentation are:  Confidence  Sincerity  Master of subject  A friendly feeling for audience
  6. 6. Elements of presentation 1. Confidence In a way, standing before a group of people to speak for a length of time, and speaking with force and conviction, is a difficult undertaking. You need to prepare yourself psychologically for the occasion and be ready to stand your ground. This is what confidence amounts to. If you are sure of yourself and sure about your message, you find it easier to carry your audience with you. To be thoroughly sure of your grounds, it requires a good deal of research into your subject, preparation, and anticipating the audience you are going to face.
  7. 7. Elements of presentation 2. Sincerity When does a preacher succeed in preaching? When he means what he says and has the interests of the listeners in his heart. A good presentation begins in the heart and reaches the listeners’ hearts. However, having sincerity and being able to communicate it to the audience are not the same. Your inner state, your attitude needs to be translated into the delivery. The ability to convey your sincerity is the ability of an actor.
  8. 8. Elements of presentation 3. Master of Subject Mastery of the subject requires that you see the subject from many points of view. A good speaker gathers more information than may be required for the speech. If you master the subject you are presenting you’ll be able to bring the message in an effective manner. If, for example you are giving a presentation on Racism, you’ll need to see the issue from the standpoint of the ones being affected because of it. This helps you understand the insecurities and helps you understand in detail about the problems faced. If you aren’t being affected because of this and you try to give out a presentation you’ll just be able to inform your audience about the tip of iceberg problems that has a possibility of your audience already knowing about it.
  9. 9. Elements of Presentation 4. A friendly feeling for audience You need to have the listeners’ welfare in mind as the purpose of your talk. You need to take care that through your actions or words, you don’t militate against any of their pet likes. When you stand before a group of people, many of whom are strangers to you and with their own opinions, you can be effective by radiating a friendly feeling. A motivation speaker started her speech before a large crowd of restless youths with the resounding words, “I love this audience.” This was said in a radiant tone and eye-to-eye contact with the listeners. Instantly, a friendly bond was established.
  10. 10. 4 P’s of a Presentation o Plan o Prepare o Practice o Present
  11. 11. 4 P’s of Presentation 1. Plan 1. The purpose of the speech is to decide what you wish to speak about and the primary purpose of the speech. Do you wish to: (a) instruct and inform (b) convince, persuade, influence or motivate, or (c) amuse and entertain
  12. 12. 4 P’s of Presentation 2. Prepare In one sentence, write down the object of your speech. This sentence will become the criterion against which all material is be judged whether to be included or not. If there are a number of points to be dealt with, establish a theme, a central idea or concept which gives unity, direction and coherence to the presentation as a whole. List the main points to be covered and arrange them in a logical sequence. Your speech should be structured into 3 distinct parts - Opening, Body and Conclusion Write down your speech beforehand. It’ll give you an insight and filter your content before itself.
  13. 13. 4 P’s of Presentation 3. Practice Practice until you are very familiar with the speech. Practice helps to reduce nerves. Practice your speech beforehand in front of your friends or family as the feedback. Identify and alter your mannerisms and ensure you are within the time frame. Practicing your speech will help you boost your confidence and make you feel positive about your own presentations.
  14. 14. 4 P’s of Presentation 4. Present Make positive first impression: Establish eye contact Confident body language Be relaxed and well groomed Build rapport with your audience Be sincere and be yourself · Say "we" not "you" Talk in terms of your audience's interests Involve your audience Hold the attention of the audience Be enthusiastic · Use vivid words · Express yourself clearly and concisely Have an upbeat voice Close your presentation to make a favorable and lasting impression
  15. 15. The Iceberg Theory The Iceberg Theory is a style of writing created by author Ernest Heminigway. He believed that eliminating details that writer and reader inherently know, the story will strengthen. “Only 10-20% of the story is directly revealed through prose. In comparison to an actual iceberg, that is usually the portion of the floating ice mountain that is visible above water. The other 80-90% of the story lies behind the scenes and is integrated in the structure of the story.” The 3 methods: 1. Stick to One Idea Per Slide 2. Construct a Story Around the Content 3. Use Characters to Represent the Audience
  16. 16. The Iceberg Theory 1. Stick to One Idea Per Slide One mistake presenters make is cramming too much information on one slide. Showing more than one chart on a slide will not work to convey your message. Having a long bullet point list will be too much for the audience to read. Instead, break out the content onto individual slides. This will ensure that the point you want to make will be heard.
  17. 17. The Iceberg Theory 2. Construct a Story Around the Content Your slides should build on top of each other. Frame the main takeaways around an experience. This creates an emotional investment into the content. You can tell a story at the beginning of the presentation and circle back to it at the end. Or you can weave in parts of your story throughout your presentation. Keep it simple and directly tied to your message.
  18. 18. The Iceberg Theory 3. Use Characters to Represent the Audience Create a character or a series of characters to explain processes within your presentation. This works great for training presentations. Write a character that goes through the training process along with the audience. This will keep the messaging brief and simple. The audience will be able to relate to the character and quickly learn the new process.
  19. 19. Public Speaking Basically, it's a presentation that's given live before an audience. Public speeches can cover a wide variety of different topics. The goal of the speech may be to educate, entertain, or influence the listeners. Often, visual aids in the form of an electronic slideshow are used to supplement the speech and make it more interesting to the listeners. “ There are always three speeches one of you actually gave. The one you practised, the one you gave, and the one you wish you gave.” - Dale Carnegie
  20. 20. Elements of Public Speaking There are 7 elements to a good speech and an effective communication process. The 7 elements are as follows: • Speaker • Message • Channel •Listener • Feedback •Interference • Situation
  21. 21. Steps of Public Speaking We will be taking a look at these four areas: 1. Writing the speech 2. Overcoming a fear of speaking 3. Practicing the speech 4. Giving the speech
  22. 22. Steps of Public Speaking 1. Writing the speech The first thing you'll want to do is work on writing a well-organized, engaging speech. Because even if you've got a great speaking voice or a great deal of charisma, you won't give a good speech if your material isn't any good.
  23. 23. Steps of Public Speaking 2. Overcoming a fear of speaking Fear of public speaking is very real and can hold you back if you let it. If you don't feel confident when giving your speech, your listeners may pick up on that, making your presentation less effective. Fortunately, there are some techniques that'll help most people manage their fear of public speaking and become more confident.
  24. 24. Steps of Public Speaking 3. Practicing the speech Even if you're not afraid of public speaking, practicing your speech is still an important step to having an effective speech. If you're in a rush, you may be tempted to skip practicing your speech to save time. While skipping practice may seem like a good idea, it's really not. By practicing your speech not only do you improve your public speaking skills, but you also increase your familiarity with the presentation—making it more likely that your speech will go smoothly.
  25. 25. Steps of Public Speaking 4. Giving the speech Now that you've written a good speech, feel more confident about public speaking, and have practiced—you're ready to actually give the speech. There are some tips and tricks you can use on the day of your speech to make it go more smoothly, though. Remember, you're giving a presentation before a live audience at a specific place and time. So, you've got some concerns about the speaking venue that those who give online presentations don't have to worry about. Some common concerns for public speakers include: •Will the audience be able the hear me? •Does the venue have the equipment I need? •Are there enough seats for all of my listeners?
  26. 26. Body Language Body language is a type of a nonverbal communication in which physical behaviors, as opposed to words, are used to express or convey the information. Such behavior includes facial expressions, body posture, gestures, eye movement, touch and the use of space. When we are able to "read" these signs, we can use it to our advantage. For example, it can help us to understand the complete message of what someone is trying to say to us, and to enhance our awareness of people's reactions to what we say and do. “The body never lies.” - Martha Graham
  27. 27. Reading body languages 1. Crossed arms and legs signal resistance to your ideas. Crossed arms and legs are physical barriers that suggest the other person is not open to what you're saying. Even if they're smiling and engaged in a pleasant conversation, their body language tells the story. 2. Real smiles crinkle the eyes. When it comes to smiling, the mouth can lie but the eyes can't. Genuine smiles reach the eyes, crinkling the skin to create crow's feet around them. People often smile to hide what they're really thinking and feeling, so the next time you want to know if someone's smile is genuine, look for crinkles at the corners of their eyes. If they aren't there, that smile is hiding something. 3. Raised eyebrows signal discomfort. There are three main emotions that make your eyebrows go up: surprise, worry, and fear.
  28. 28. Reading body languages 4. Copying your body language is a good thing. Have you ever been in a meeting with someone and noticed that every time you cross or uncross your legs, they do the same? Or perhaps they lean their head the same way as yours when you're talking? That's actually a good sign. Mirroring body language is something we do unconsciously when we feel a bond with the other person. It's a sign that the conversation is going well and that the other party is receptive to your message. This knowledge can be especially useful when you're negotiating, because it shows you what the other person is really thinking about the deal. 5. Exaggerated nodding signals anxiety about approval. When you're telling someone something and they nod excessively, this means that they are worried about what you think of them or that you doubt their ability to follow your instructions.
  29. 29. Making a positive impression •Have an open posture. Be relaxed, but don't slouch! Sit or stand upright and place your hands by your sides (see figure 1). Avoid standing with your hands on your hips, as this will make you appear larger, which can communicate aggression or a desire to dominate (see figure 2). •Use a firm handshake. But don't get carried away! You don't want it to become awkward or, worse, painful for the other person. If it does, you'll likely come across as rude or aggressive. •Maintain good eye contact. Try to hold the other person's gaze for a few seconds at a time. This will show her that you're sincere and engaged. But, avoid turning it into a staring match! (See figure 3.) •Avoid touching your face. There's a common perception that people who touch their faces while answering questions are being dishonest (see figure 4). While this isn't always true, it's best to avoid fiddling with your hair or touching your mouth or nose, particularly if your aim is to come across as trustworthy. The figures are shown in the next slide. Figure 1 to Figure 4
  30. 30. Negative gestures Signs of a negative or defensive body gestures someone is exhibiting one or more of the following behaviors, he will likely be disengaged, disinterested or unhappy arms folded in front of the body. •Arms folded in front of the body. •Minimal or tense facial expression. •Body turned away from you. •Eyes downcast, maintaining little contact.
  31. 31. Mehrabian Circle Albert Mehrabian developed a communication model, in which he demonstrated that only 7% of what we communicate consists of the literal content of the message. The use of one's voice, such as tone, intonation and volume, take up 38% and as much as 55% of communication consists of body language. Mehrabian comes to two main conclusions in his studies: 1. There are basically three elements in any face-to face communication: i. Words ii. Tone of voice iii. Nonverbal behavior / body language. 2. The non-verbal elements are particularly important for communicating feelings and attitude, especially when they are inconsistent i.e. if words disagree with the tone of voice and nonverbal behavior, people tend to believe the tonality and nonverbal behavior.
  32. 32. Mehrabian Circle According to Mehrabian, the three elements account differently for our liking for the person who puts forward a message concerning their feelings. They are often abbreviated as the "3 Vs" for Verbal, Vocal & Visual.
  33. 33. Benefits of Mehrabian Circle •It's not just words: a lot is communication comes through non-verbal communication. •Without ‘seeing and hearing’ nonverbal elements, it is easier to misunderstand the words. •When we are unsure about what the words mean, we pay more attention to the nonverbal indicators. •When you feel that a person is not telling the truth, check out the alignment between words, voice and body language. • If you want the other person to pay more attention to your body language, be less clear with your words. If you want them to trust the words, be clear and unambiguous. • We will pay more attention to the nonverbal indicators when we trust the person less and suspect deception, as it is generally understood that voice tone and body language are harder to control than words. This also leads to more attention to nonverbal signals when determining whether the other person may be lying.
  34. 34. Conclusion Presentation skills- A presentation can be done only by preparing in advance, rehearsal experience. Various points must be taken care of before presenting like about audience, time and venue, etc. Public speaking- Public speaking is more than standing in front of a group and talking; you also need to engage your audience. Acknowledge your audience as soon as you take the stage. This helps to make you seem more like a "real" person and keeps a conversational tone. Body Language: The ability to understand and to interpret body language can help you to pick up on unspoken issues, problems or negative feelings that other people might have. You can also use it in a positive way to add strength to your verbal messages.

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