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Yogurt : the perfect FIT for a healthy lifestyle ?

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Yogurt : the perfect FIT for a healthy lifestyle ?

The capacity of a single food, such as yogurt, to influence diet quality and metabolic health depends on its composition and its potential to modify the rest of food consumption. Prof Angelo Tremblay presented recent data, during our 4th Yogurt Summit at EB2016, showing that regular yogurt consumption can be a signature of a global healthy lifestyle.

The capacity of a single food, such as yogurt, to influence diet quality and metabolic health depends on its composition and its potential to modify the rest of food consumption. Prof Angelo Tremblay presented recent data, during our 4th Yogurt Summit at EB2016, showing that regular yogurt consumption can be a signature of a global healthy lifestyle.

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Yogurt : the perfect FIT for a healthy lifestyle ?

  1. 1. Angelo Tremblay Department of Kinesiology Laval University
  2. 2. Conflictofinterest regardingthispresentation I wish to declare a potential conflict of interest, and that I have received either direct or indirect industry support in relation to all or part of the results presented here: General Mills Danone Research Pfizer Nestlé Dairy Farmers of Canada Dairy Research Institute
  3. 3.  Its nutritional content  Its impact on concomitant and/or subsequent food intake  Its relationship with healthy behaviors
  4. 4. Nutrient Nutrient Content DRI for women Women (% daily intake) DRI for men Men (% daily intake) Energy (kcal) 114 6a 4.5a Protein (g) 9.5 46 21 56 17 Calcium (mg) 332 1000 33 1000 33 Magnesium (mg) 30.8 320 9.6 420 7.3 Phosphorus (mg) 261 700 37 700 37 Riboflavin (mg) 0.39 1.1 35 1.3 30 Zinc (mg) 1.6 8 20 11 14.5 Vitamin B12 (µg) 1.0 2.4 42 2.4 42 aBased on a 2000 kcal/d diet and 2500 kcal/d diet for women and men, respectively. Adapted from Panahi and Tremblay J Am Coll Nutr 2016
  5. 5. Yogurt and dairy consumption were associated with variations in nutrient intake: • calcium • vitamin D • protein • total and saturated fat From Keast DR et al. Nutrients, 7: 1577-93, 2015
  6. 6.  Yogurt consumers compared with non- consumers, had higher potassium intakes (difference, 0.12 g/d)  And were 47%, 55%, 48%, 38%, and 34% less likely to have inadequate intakes (based on DRI) of respectively (all p≤ .001): • Vitamins B2 and B12 • Calcium • Magnesium • Zinc From Wang H et al. Nutr Res. 33: 18-26, 2013
  7. 7. In children aged (4–18 months; 1.5–3 years; 4–10 years) The yogurt group made a useful contribution to micronutrient intakes, particularly: - Vitamin B12 (7.6%; 5.3%; 3.8% respectively) - riboflavin (7.8%, 6.9%, and 5.7%,respectively) - calcium (9.5%, 8.2%, and 5.9%, respectively) - iodine (7.2%, 7.6%, and 7%, respectively) - and phosphorus (8.1%, 6.3%, and 4.3%, respectively) From Williams et al. Nutrition Bulletin. 40: 9-32, 2015
  8. 8. “American children aged 2 to 11 consume extra energy and sugars in their diets but insufficient vitamin D, calcium, and potassium. Substituting one serving of low sugar, whole milk yogurt, paired with fruit or vegetables, for current snacks would increase children’s consumption of valuable nutrients without adding excess sugar or energy.” From Hess J and Slavin J, Nutrients 6: 4750-9, 2014
  9. 9.  Its nutritional content  Its impact on concomitant and/or subsequent food intake  Its relationship with healthy behaviors
  10. 10. Cohorts: Framingham Heart Study offspring (1998-2001) and Third Generation (2002-2005) cohorts Diet quality: Dietary Guidelines Adherence Index (DGAI)
  11. 11. Variable Non-consumers (n = 3016) Consumers (n = 3510) Mean energy from yogurt (% kcal) 0 2.07 DGAI score 8.05 9.14 Fiber intake (g) (model 1) 15.14 17.03** ** p < 0.01 Adapted from Wang H et al. Nutr. Res. 33: 18-26, 2013
  12. 12. Cohorts: NHANES Diet quality: Healthy Eating Index (HEI) Results: Those frequent consumers had significantly better diet quality than infrequent consumers (Healthy Eating Index). Specifically, they consumed more fruit, whole grains, and milk (indicating a better compliance to the dietary guidelines).
  13. 13.  High FDP consumers (>6 servings/week) displayed more favorable dietary and nutritional intakes : - more fruits, fish, legumes, nuts, water, and fibers, - less prepared meals and less alcohol than low consumers  Higher scores of diet quality (PANDIET) and better compliance with the French dietary recommendations were observed with increasing FDP consumption  Eventually, high FDP consumers exhibited better adequacy to the dietary recommended allowances for 11 micronutrients (vitamins B1, B2, B5, B6, B9, C, A and calcium, iodine, selenium, copper) Pourcentage (%) d’adultes n’atteignant pas les 2/3 des apports nutritionnels conseillés
  14. 14. From Mozaffarian ; Circulation 2016 ;133:187-225
  15. 15. Anafternoonsnackofgreekyogurt,containing24gprotein(P),ledtoreduced hunger,increasedfullnessanddelayedsubsequenteatingcomparedtolower proteinsnacksinhealthywomen... Condition / protein Mean delay in the request of dinner after yogurt snack (min) High P / 24 g 178 Medium P / 14 g 158 Low P / 5 g 152 No snack / 0 G 124 but the 160-kcal snack content was not fully compensated despite a lower subsequent energy intake at dinner time. Adapted from Douglas SM et al. Appetite 60: 117-122, 2013
  16. 16. Meal Breakfast Snack (Yogurt (Y)) Buffet-type meal Time 8 10 12 VAS VAS Energy intakeY1: r* = 1.5:1 Y2: r = control, r = 2.8:1 * r = casein/whey protein ratio. r in milk = 4.5:1 From Doyon, C. Et al. APNM, 2015
  17. 17. Condition Energy intake (kcal) Hunger (mm x min) PFC (mm x min) Appreciation (mm) Y1 (high whey) 1216* 1422 1031 87 Y2 (control) 1410 1785 1573 82 * P < 0.05 From Doyon, C. Et al. APNM, 2015
  18. 18. kcal Decrease in subsequent energy intake versus control 194 Energy content of the yogurt snack 63 Difference 131 Adapted from Doyon, C. Et al. APNM, 2015
  19. 19.  Its nutritional content  Its impact on concomitant and/or subsequent food intake  Its relationship with healthy behaviors
  20. 20. Food groups Factor 1 (Western pattern) Factor 2 (Prudent pattern) French fries and fried foods -0.19 Condiments -0.05 Processed meats 0.03 Refined grains -0.17 Snacks -0.01 Red meats -0.12 Pizza -0.25 Vegetables -0.16 Fruits -0.17 Nuts 0.02 0.64 0.59 0.54 0.48 0.46 0.46 0.66 0.53 0.65 0.68 Factor loading ≥ 0.30 is marked in yellow. Adapted from Cormier H et al. Eur. J. Nutr 2015
  21. 21. Food groups Factor 1 (Western pattern) Factor 2 (Prudent pattern) Non-hydrogenated fats 0.13 Legumes -0.21 Fish and other seafoods -0.06 Beer -0.10 High-fat dairy products 0.20 Yogurt -0.17 Regular soft drinks -0.21 Mayonnaise 0.12 Hard liquor 0.08 0.38 0.31 0.32 0.37 0.31 0.37 0.38 0.47 0.40 Factor loading ≥ 0.30 is marked in yellow. Adapted from Cormier H et al. Eur. J. Nutr 2015
  22. 22. Per capita family income and being a nonsmoker were factors positively associated with the amount of yogurt consumption (coefficients, 0.61 and 3.73, respectively) Possa et al. NUTRITION RESEARCH, 35 (8):700- 706; AUG 2015
  23. 23. Among adults, yogurt consumers were 40% more likely to practice physical activity (≥ 2h/week), 30% less likely to smoke than non consumers (p<0.05). Yogurt consumers were more likely to have a good knowledge of the food-health relationship and accustomed to reading food labels. (p<0.05). D’Addezio et al. Sociodemoographic and lifestyle characteristics of yogurt consumers in Italy: Results from the INRAN-SCAI 2005-06 survey. Med J Nutrition Metab 8 (2015) 119-129
  24. 24. Yogurt consumers have: Better nutritional intakes Healthier dietary patterns Healthier lifestyle Yogurt consumption can be viewed as a signature of a healthy diet & lifestyle

Notes de l'éditeur

  • Relative contribution of a portion (175 g) of plain yogurt (1% to 2% M.F.) to energy and nutrient intakes in men and women.
    aBased on a 2000 kcal/d diet and 2500 kcal/d diet for women and men, respectively.

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