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By:
Xainab Rana
DPT 2nd year
 Ergonomics
 Ergonomics and child health
 Ergonomic disorders & Risk factors
 Analysis of child care environment
 Inj...
 Ergonomics is a way of designing the job,
equipment, tools and task to fit the worker
and help avoid injuries.
 Ergonom...
 Caring for one’s children is among the
most ubiquitous of occupations.
 However, few studies have examined the
ergonomi...
 The purpose of this study was to identify the
frequency, type, and severity of
musculoskeletal symptoms in parents of
ch...
 A convenience sample of 130 parents with
children younger than 4 years old completed
a seven-page survey that included q...
 Ninety-two percent (92%) of the providers
were mothers.
 Sixty-six percent (66%) of the sample
reported the presence of...
 The most common ergonomic disorders seen
in those who work with young children are:
 Back injuries
 Chronic lower back...
 Burping Wrist sets in fast.
 Risk factors are present: repetition, duration,
sustained force, and little opportunity fo...
 Discomfort, aching or burning sensation
within the wrist joint
 Sharp or shooting pain
 Swelling, warmth
 Reduced ran...
 Try to maintain neutral wrist postures during
repetitive and/or sustained activities.
 Switch sides to help distribute ...
 The baby holding posture typically involves:
 shrugging the shoulders
 bending the upper body forward
 keeping the el...
 Overexertion, lifting, carrying, and straining
cause back injuries in childcare workers.
 The key workday factors relat...
 Carry child in car seat
 Carry child on one hip
 Carry child while bending down
 Lift child up to or off a changing t...
 Watch your “B.A.C.K” and consider the “SPF”—size,
position, and frequency—of each lift.
 Size
Challenge: The child is t...
 Before lifting, move your torso towards the child
 keep your back straight by bending forward from
your hips, keeping y...
Don’t lift
children
with your back
you lift, bend your knees
and keep the child close to you
Avoid twisting your
body when lifting
Point your feet in
the direction of the lift
Avoid Twisting
 Work with management to plan furniture
purchases for you as well as the children.
For example, chairs should be availabl...
 Reduce the size of heavy and wet laundry and
other bags.
 Replace large, industrial-size garbage cans,
with smaller tra...
Don’t carry heavy
loads by yours Carry lighter loads
Use a cart, or get a
co-worker to help you
 If possible, allow the child to cooperate and
come up to your level (e.g., use steps for a
toddler to climb up to the ch...
Avoid sitting on
the
floor too long
without back
support
Use the wall,
furniture
or large pillow
for back
support
Do stret...
 Use rolling carts or strollers to carry heavier
loads and children.
 Instead of repetitive bending and stooping to
clea...
 1. Put one foot next to
the child.
 Keep your back straight,
push your buttocks out
and slowly lower
yourself down onto...
 2. Position the child close
to the knee on the floor.
 3. Slide the child from the
knee on the floor to mid-
thigh.
Kee...
 4. Put both of your
forearms under the child
with your palms facing
upward and hug the child
close to you.
 5. Prepare ...
 6. Lift upwards following
your head and shoulders.
Hold the child close to
your body.
Lift by extending your
legs with y...
 Use the pivot technique for lifts that require
you to turn
such as lifting an infant to the diapering
surface.
 Twistin...
 1. Properly lift the
infant.
 2. Hold the infant
very close to your
Body.
 3. Turn your foot 90
degrees toward the
way you want to turn.
 4. Bring your other foot
next to the leading
foot.
Do no...
 Avoid leaning downward from the waist to
reach for children.
 Squat with feet shoulder width apart keeping
back straigh...
 Store most frequently used and heaviest
items in an easily accessible area and at waist
height.
 Adjust diapering surfa...
 Avoid bending down at the waist to interact
with toddlers. Instead, assume a squatting or
kneeling position.
 Squat or ...
 1. Stand upright.
 2. Place your feet a shoulder
width apart.
 3. Place your hands on your
lower back.
 4. Lean backw...
1. Lie on your stomach with your legs
straight and feet together.
2. Prop up your upper body with your
forearms.
3. Push u...
 Lie on your back with knees bent and feet flat
on the floor.
 Press your lower back onto the floor.
 Grasp one knee wi...
 Lie on your back.
 Bend your knees at a 90-
degree angle.
 Tighten stomach muscles
and buttocks.
 Slowly push your lo...
 Different ergonomic products are used in
child care which can safe the caregivers and
parents from different risk factor...
Thank you…..
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
Ergonomics in child care and parenting
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Ergonomics in child care and parenting

Ergonimical aspects of child care and parenting. pros and cons!

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Ergonomics in child care and parenting

  1. 1. By: Xainab Rana DPT 2nd year
  2. 2.  Ergonomics  Ergonomics and child health  Ergonomic disorders & Risk factors  Analysis of child care environment  Injury prevention in child care  Infant lifting techniques  Other ways of preventing back injury and pain during toddler care  Keeping the back healthy  Ergonomic products for baby care
  3. 3.  Ergonomics is a way of designing the job, equipment, tools and task to fit the worker and help avoid injuries.  Ergonomics covers all physical aspects of a job:  biomechanical, including stress on muscles, nerves, bones  Sensory, including hearing and vision  environmental, including lightening, noise, temperature and humidity
  4. 4.  Caring for one’s children is among the most ubiquitous of occupations.  However, few studies have examined the ergonomic risks involved in parents caring for children at home or care givers at day care centers.
  5. 5.  The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency, type, and severity of musculoskeletal symptoms in parents of children less than 4 years old.  They further examined the factors that contribute to musculoskeletal pain n disorders.
  6. 6.  A convenience sample of 130 parents with children younger than 4 years old completed a seven-page survey that included questions related to:  the parents’ demographics  their musculoskeletal discomfort  their performance of child-care tasks with high biomechanical risks (such as carrying a child in a car seat)  and parents’ perceived psychological strain related to caring for their children.
  7. 7.  Ninety-two percent (92%) of the providers were mothers.  Sixty-six percent (66%) of the sample reported the presence of musculoskeletal pain.  The parts of the body most affected were the low back (48%), neck (17%), upper back (16%), and shoulders (11.5%).
  8. 8.  The most common ergonomic disorders seen in those who work with young children are:  Back injuries  Chronic lower back pain  Burping Wrist  Tension Neck Syndrome  Carpal tunnel syndrome  Sick building syndrome  Headaches , fatigues and Stiffness
  9. 9.  Burping Wrist sets in fast.  Risk factors are present: repetition, duration, sustained force, and little opportunity for recovery.  These risk factors present fatigue development, and further complicating the matter, consider joint laxity (for moms), and the intense fear of not getting a burp and dealing with the gastrointestinal consequences later, ineffective job/task rotation (because what doesn’t involve hands and wrists?) and the requirement to simultaneously hold up that floppy little head and body with the other hand. This situation is the perfect recipe for injury. This is often coupled with “Mommy Thumb” (de Quervain’s tenosynovitis), where the pain is localized over the thumb side of the wrist.
  10. 10.  Discomfort, aching or burning sensation within the wrist joint  Sharp or shooting pain  Swelling, warmth  Reduced range of pain-free range of motion  Tender and/or tense muscles in the forearms  Numbness or tingling in the hand
  11. 11.  Try to maintain neutral wrist postures during repetitive and/or sustained activities.  Switch sides to help distribute workload between right and left hands. For example, use your right hand to pat baby’s back at one feeding, then use the left for the next.  When lifting and holding baby, keep your thumb close to your hand.  Use a baby wrap or carrier, even around the house.  Reduce, as much as possible, the length of time spent carrying the bucket seat – a stroller adapter is a wise investment.  Keep baby in close to your body when holding and snuggling – use your torso and arms to help support baby so your wrists can relax. Use pillows as well.
  12. 12.  The baby holding posture typically involves:  shrugging the shoulders  bending the upper body forward  keeping the elbow at less than 90 degrees  and bending/twisting the head downward to keep an eye on things.  In combination with prolonged periods of time spent in these postures, supporting the baby’s weight, and sometimes very little opportunity to rest, it causes pain in neck and back
  13. 13.  Overexertion, lifting, carrying, and straining cause back injuries in childcare workers.  The key workday factors related to these injuries are:  the large difference in size between the childcare worker and the child  the position of the worker in relation to the child  how often the worker is lifting.
  14. 14.  Carry child in car seat  Carry child on one hip  Carry child while bending down  Lift child up to or off a changing table  Lift child into or out of a crib with high sides  Lift child up from the floor  Stand bent over to wash child  Change child on floor, crib, or playpen  Open baby food jars and cans  Push child on a seated toy  Breast feed in an awkward position
  15. 15.  Watch your “B.A.C.K” and consider the “SPF”—size, position, and frequency—of each lift.  Size Challenge: The child is too large or too heavy. Solution: Get help, re-plan the lift, or have the child assist (with steps or a platform).  Position Challenge: to bend over or reach over something to lift the child. Solution: Bring the child close to you before lifting.  Frequency Challenge: I routinely lift a child. Solution: Split up shifts or rotate duties if possible. Performing repetitive motions, especially in non- neutral postures increases injury risk even more.
  16. 16.  Before lifting, move your torso towards the child  keep your back straight by bending forward from your hips, keeping your back straight.  Tighten your core (back and abdominal) muscles and pull the child into your body  Continue to brace your back as you extend your back into a fully upright posture.  Release the excess tension in your core muscle.  Remember, to protect your back you need to tighten your core prior to lifting and release the excess muscle tension after returning to an upright posture.
  17. 17. Don’t lift children with your back you lift, bend your knees and keep the child close to you
  18. 18. Avoid twisting your body when lifting Point your feet in the direction of the lift Avoid Twisting
  19. 19.  Work with management to plan furniture purchases for you as well as the children. For example, chairs should be available with an adult-size seat pan and back support, but short legs.
  20. 20.  Reduce the size of heavy and wet laundry and other bags.  Replace large, industrial-size garbage cans, with smaller trash cans to help reduce the size of the load.
  21. 21. Don’t carry heavy loads by yours Carry lighter loads Use a cart, or get a co-worker to help you
  22. 22.  If possible, allow the child to cooperate and come up to your level (e.g., use steps for a toddler to climb up to the changing table)  Several changing tables are available with steps that allow toddlers to assist themselves with climbing to the changing area.  When teaching or working with children on the floor or toddlers in child-sized furniture, avoid stooping and sit supported on the floor.
  23. 23. Avoid sitting on the floor too long without back support Use the wall, furniture or large pillow for back support Do stretching exercises
  24. 24.  Use rolling carts or strollers to carry heavier loads and children.  Instead of repetitive bending and stooping to clean up toys, etc., incorporate this into children’s clean up and have toddlers pick up the toys.
  25. 25.  1. Put one foot next to the child.  Keep your back straight, push your buttocks out and slowly lower yourself down onto one knee.  (For support as you lower yourself down, put one hand on a stool or on your thigh.)
  26. 26.  2. Position the child close to the knee on the floor.  3. Slide the child from the knee on the floor to mid- thigh. Keep your head forward, your back straight , and your buttocks out, and lift the child onto the opposite thigh.
  27. 27.  4. Put both of your forearms under the child with your palms facing upward and hug the child close to you.  5. Prepare for the lift: look forward.
  28. 28.  6. Lift upwards following your head and shoulders. Hold the child close to your body. Lift by extending your legs with your back straight, your buttocks out, and breathe out as you lift.
  29. 29.  Use the pivot technique for lifts that require you to turn such as lifting an infant to the diapering surface.  Twisting while lifting can cause serious damage to the tissues of the back. Use the pivot technique to avoid twisting while lifting.
  30. 30.  1. Properly lift the infant.  2. Hold the infant very close to your Body.
  31. 31.  3. Turn your foot 90 degrees toward the way you want to turn.  4. Bring your other foot next to the leading foot. Do not twist your body!
  32. 32.  Avoid leaning downward from the waist to reach for children.  Squat with feet shoulder width apart keeping back straight and pushing your buttocks out to bring yourself as close to the child as possible, holding the child securely.  Tighten stomach muscles and looking forward use thigh muscles to raise yourself breathing out as you lift.
  33. 33.  Store most frequently used and heaviest items in an easily accessible area and at waist height.  Adjust diapering surfaces to waist height when steps to the surface are not available.  Lower side of cribs to lift and lower child in and out of the crib.  Use adult size chair seats with child size legs.
  34. 34.  Avoid bending down at the waist to interact with toddlers. Instead, assume a squatting or kneeling position.  Squat or kneel on a kneepad.  While sitting on the floor, when possible sit against a wall or furniture or a pillow to support the back.
  35. 35.  1. Stand upright.  2. Place your feet a shoulder width apart.  3. Place your hands on your lower back.  4. Lean backward while keeping your neck straight.  5. Lean further back until you feel a slight stretch in your back.  6. Hold for a count of 5.  7. Return to the upright position.  8. Repeat 3 or 4times.
  36. 36. 1. Lie on your stomach with your legs straight and feet together. 2. Prop up your upper body with your forearms. 3. Push upward while keeping your pelvis on the floor. 4. Hold for 5 seconds. 5. Gently lower yourself to the floor. Remember to keep your forearms in contact with the floor at all times. 6. Repeat 5 times.
  37. 37.  Lie on your back with knees bent and feet flat on the floor.  Press your lower back onto the floor.  Grasp one knee with both hands and pull toward your chest keeping your head on the floor.  Keep the other knee bent and foot on the floor.  Hold for a count of 10 then return to starting position.  Repeat with the other leg.  Repeat 10 times on each leg for 3 sets
  38. 38.  Lie on your back.  Bend your knees at a 90- degree angle.  Tighten stomach muscles and buttocks.  Slowly push your lower back downward.  Hold your back in this position for 5 seconds.  Slowly return to normal and relax.  Repeat 5times.
  39. 39.  Different ergonomic products are used in child care which can safe the caregivers and parents from different risk factors of MSD n pains.  Few important products are:  Ergonomic Baby Carriers  Ergonomic Baby Cradles  Ergonomic Baby Car Seats  Ergonomic Baby Bathtubs  Ergonomic Baby Pushchairs  Ergonomic Baby Highchairs
  40. 40. Thank you…..

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