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Insights from the 2015 Public Sector Summit at Harvard

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Leadership from
Invention to Impact
Highlights and Insights from the 2015 Public Sector
for the Future Summit at Harvard U...

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Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 2
Every organization and system in the world produces
exactly the results ...

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Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 3
Peter Hutchinson
Managing Director,
Accenture Public Services Strategy
S...

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Insights from the 2015 Public Sector Summit at Harvard

  1. 1. Leadership from Invention to Impact Highlights and Insights from the 2015 Public Sector for the Future Summit at Harvard University
  2. 2. Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 2 Every organization and system in the world produces exactly the results it is designed to produce—and government is no exception. To achieve different results, public service organizations need different designs. In this digital era, opportunities for innovative designs have never been greater. This year’s Public Sector for the Future Summit again used the Uptake and Edge Matrix to examine innovations: • Innovations and business models on the “Uptake” are proven effective but require robust leadership to implement. • Those on the “Edge” are still emerging yet are poised to deliver a significant increase in public value. Summit highlights and insights
  3. 3. Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 3 Peter Hutchinson Managing Director, Accenture Public Services Strategy Summit highlights and insights (continued) “The distance between what our society expects and what our governments are able to deliver is widening—and that creates a legitimacy gap.” Please advance to next slide to launch video Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 3
  4. 4. Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 4 Share and share alike: “Access is actually equal to or greater than ownership” Industry innovators have shown how digital technology makes it easier to uncover unused capacity—and put it to work for operational, financial and environmental benefit. Summit attendees discussed “Edge” innovations around collaborative consumption: renting rather than owning buildings, equipment and vehicles and gaining as-needed access to IT and human resources. Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 4
  5. 5. Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 5 Anita Roth Head of Policy Research, Airbnb “There’s a shift in mentality that access is actually equal to or greater than ownership. There are a lot of benefits you get with access and responsibilities that you don’t have to take on if you don’t have ownership.” Share and share alike (continued) Emily Castor Director of Transportation Policy, Lyft “Looking at flexible services, like Lyft, can be a very cost-effective way for government to leverage the private sector to help achieve some objectives that it already has and, in doing so, to help do things like reducing greenhouse gas emissions or improving air quality, [as well as] reducing parking congestion and traffic congestion in cities.” Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 5
  6. 6. Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 6 How can government leverage an explosion of data to make better decisions and provide better services? Building on years of foundational efforts, Washington Governor Jay Inslee has launched Results Washington—a performance and results management initiative crossing 53 state agencies, boards and commissions. Evidence-based government: Moving from anecdotes to metrics World-class education Prosperous economy Sustainable energy and a clean environment Healthy and safe communities Efficient, effective and accountable government The program’s five core goals: 1 2 3 4 5 53
  7. 7. Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 7 Evidence-based government (continued) Results Washington director Wendy Korthuis-Smith presented at the Summit, sharing Washington’s experiences with enterprise-level performance analytics and management. Please advance to next slide to launch video Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 7
  8. 8. Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 8 Sunstein’s latest research has uncovered overwhelming American support for a wide range of nudges—from a “traffic light” system for labeling foods to graphic advertising aimed at reducing childhood obesity—with agreement across partisan lines. The research points to compelling opportunities for government to use nudges as they drive “Uptake” and “Edge” innovations and business models. Evidence-based government (continued) “A nudge is like a GPS…It’s an intervention that maintains liberty but also influences people in good directions. Warnings, reminders, information, uses of social rules and default rules are all nudges.” Keynote speaker Cass Sunstein The Robert Walmsley Professor University Professor and founder/director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 8
  9. 9. Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 9 When David Bray became CIO, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) had 200+ different IT systems, with many that were aging and expensive to maintain. The FCC was also relying on extensive paper-based processes. By embracing a cloud-based approach, the FCC could become more agile, more resilient and more efficient. Leading through change To overcome resistance to change, Bray employed a number of approaches that other public service leaders can use within their organizations: Communicate— inside and out Acknowledge the past Enlist internal entrepreneurs Empower people
  10. 10. Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 10 David Bray shared his insights about how cross-boundary partnerships can help design a more citizen- centric government. Moving to citizen-centric business models Please advance to next slide to launch video Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 10
  11. 11. Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 11 For attendees, the Public Sector for the Future Summit delivered important validation that governments at all levels are facing many of the same challenges. It also showed how public service organizations can improve outcomes by embracing innovations—sharing instead of owning assets, incorporating data analytics into day-to-day operations and infusing public entrepreneurship into their cultures. “Leadership starts with self,” wrote one Summit attendee. “Don’t wait for others… Address both sides of the equation. If I identify the problem, [I] need to propose solutions.” For another attendee, the key takeaway was balancing innovation and stability: “Implementing innovation is really change management, and transformational change is possible in large organizations.” In summary: Improving outcomes by embracing innovations
  12. 12. Copyright © 2016 Accenture All rights reserved. 12 Peter Hutchinson peter.c.hutchinson@accenture.com Pari Sabety j.p.sabety@accenture.com Bill Kilmartin william.kilmartin@accenture.com Learn more about the Harvard Public Sector for the Future Summit For more information:

Notes de l'éditeur


  • [On screen text: Transforming government]
    The problem here in the 21st century is our whole society is moving faster, is changing faster. And the distance between what our society expects and what our governments are able to deliver is widening and that creates a legitimacy gap. And I think one of the fundamental issues that governments have to deal with is how do we close that gap? How do we get closer to delivering not just the services, but the way we deliver services in a way that our citizens have come to expect, innovation, invention, that’s really the way to get there and that won’t happen without leadership.

    [On screen text: The digital opportunity]
    If you can have government in your pocket, and you pretty much can, and if you can individually interact with your government and get the kind of services you want, so think 311, I can call, I can talk to somebody or I can communicate online individually and I can individually get a response. This is totally changing the way we understand how citizens interact with these public sector organizations. And that’s only going to accelerate as time goes on. I now see governments catching up, actually starting to think about how can they make social media part of how I deliver service? How can I use these tools and techniques to bring citizens in and make them part of, not just part of consuming the services, but actually part of creating the services? This is radically altering in how we think about government. And it’s taking us back to a really old idea which was government was really us. And I think in many, many ways, we’re headed back toward sort of the 18th century model, that sort of that town meeting model that said, you know it’s us. We do this work together and the technology is now going to make it possible when there’s millions or hundreds of millions of us, when it was only possible in the old days when there were a few.
  • [On screen text: Overcoming obstacles]
    I think one of the toughest challenges or barriers in beginning this journey is trying to make sure that we allow the commitment and participation from the employees and directors and agencies to evolve and that takes some time. And so it’s somewhat easy to say, well, here’s the strategic planning pieces of it and this is what we have to do, but trying to get the engagement and the participation, call it the messy participation in state government because you want to hear those voices and challenges that people might have with that and that takes time. And so I think for us starting out in 2013, it took about six months for a lot of that to kick in at the highest level with the directors and the deputy directors. And certainly could we have gone faster? Absolutely, but it took time to get that commitment and we’re at a good place now where they’re very committed to the work we’re doing.

    [On screen text: Digital citizen engagement]
    So I could think of several ways how we’ve changed the way we do business with governments from a citizen perspective and one of those areas is just simply about transparency. Entering our department of licensing, our driver’s license offices and being able to see as you’re driving there that there’s – you’re going to have about a 20 minute wait. And so you can make a decision to go then or come back or go get your number and come back and so the wait time’s decreasing, but also that transparency about expectation management with that. I think, you know, the direction we’re headed is really powerful because it’s getting citizens interested in the work that we’re doing. It’s making it real for them and so anytime we can do that and share the data, share the information and bring them in as partners. That will help us and help them.
  • [On screen text: Blurring boundaries]
    So I think what’s really happening right now is the lines between organizations are getting blurred. Not just within any sector, whether it be a public sector or private sector, but things that traditionally government had to do just because there were no competing resources outside of government to do it, can now be done either by public/private partnerships or by the public directly. So if you look at the example of in your pocket, your smartphone has as much computing power as President Reagan had in the early 1980s that the Pentagon had. That’s now available to the public. And so the public can now do things traditionally government had to do, if they want to.
    [On screen text: Digital dividends for FCC]
    …we’ve already had some early wins with our release of new consumer help desk effort that demonstrated that we could take something that even asking the private sector, private sector quoted it would take between eighteen and twenty four months and 3.2 million dollars to do it on site. We choose not to do it on site, we went straight to a public cloud offering, software as a service and we were able to get done in less than six months. And instead of it being 3.2 million it was only 450,000, so one sixth the price. So that demonstrates that we can now go forward with this approach and do it for the other systems as well.

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