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#ENDWILDLIFECRIME
Backing Rhinos to Survie
BASIC FACTS ABOUT RHINOCEROSES
Rhinoceroses are the largest land mammals after the elephant. The word
“rhinoceros” comes f...
THE 5 SPECIES OF RHINOS
White Rhinoceroses
(Ceratotherium simum)
There are five species of rhinos, two African and three A...
Asian Rhinos
Great one-horned Rhinoceros
(Rhinoceros unicornis)
Javan Rhinoceros
(Rhinoceros sondaicus)
Sumatran Rhinocero...
Poaching : The Statistics
Rhinos were once abundant throughout Africa and Asia with an approximated worldwide population
o...
Nepal has a different story towards poaching
On World Wildlife Day, March 3 2013, Nepal celebrated 365 days with zero poac...
Threats for Rhinos
Poaching for Rhino Horns
1.Traditional Chinese Medicine
Rhino horn has been used in Chinese medicine fo...
REASONS TO SAVE RHINOS
At the turn of the 19th century, there were approximately one million rhinos. In 1970, there were
a...
Illegal Trade in Rhino Horn
Rhinos are being killed in record numbers for their horns.
To find and kill them, poachers are...
Backing Rhinos to Survive
www.nepalvisiontreks.com
977-1-4424762, 977-1-4423297
info@nepalvisiontreks.com
The Slide is pro...
Prochain SlideShare
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Wildlife crime rhino poaching

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The most disturbing trend has been the horrific increase in poaching of rhinos. South Africa has skyrocketed year on year in rhinos poaching whereas its different in the small asian country. 2011 and 2013 stats showed Zero poaching of Animals in through out Nepal.

Know more about the second biggest mammal, their remaining numbers, the possible threats directly affecting in the numbers of Rhinos.

Publié dans : Environnement
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Wildlife crime rhino poaching

  1. 1. #ENDWILDLIFECRIME Backing Rhinos to Survie
  2. 2. BASIC FACTS ABOUT RHINOCEROSES Rhinoceroses are the largest land mammals after the elephant. The word “rhinoceros” comes from the Greek “rhino” (nose) and “ceros” (horn). Fast Facts Size: Rhinos range from 6 to 12 feet long, and 4 to 6.5 feet tall. Weight: The five species range in weight from 1,300 to 7,000 pounds. Lifespan: Rhinos live up to 35 years in the wild. Top Speed: 30 miles per hour. Did You Know? Rhino horns are made of keratin – the same substance that makes up human hair and fingernails.
  3. 3. THE 5 SPECIES OF RHINOS White Rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum) There are five species of rhinos, two African and three Asian. African Rhinos Black Rhinoceroses (Diceros bicornis) Horn: Two Horned Habitat: Tropical and Subtropical Grasslands, Savan- nas and Shrublands. Current Range: South Africa, Botswana, Kenya, Na- mibia, Swaziland, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Uganda. Population: 20,405 Horn: Two Horned Habitat: Tropical and Subtropical Grasslands, Savan- nas, and Shrublands; Deserts and Xeric Shrublands. Current Range: Kenya, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Botswana, Malawi. Population: 5,055 Population figures are according to numbers published 31 December by the IUCN for African rhino species and results of a 2012 / 2013 census for Asian rhino populations.
  4. 4. Asian Rhinos Great one-horned Rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis) Javan Rhinoceros (Rhinoceros sondaicus) Sumatran Rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) Horn: One Horned Current Range: India and Nepal. Habitat: Tropical and Subtropical Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands. Population: 3,333 Horn: One Horned Current Range: Java (Indonesia) Habitat: Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests. Population: 58 - 61 Horn: Two Horned Current Range: Sumatra (Indonesia) and Sabah (Malaysia) Habitat: Dense highland and lowland tropical and sub-tropical forests Population: <100
  5. 5. Poaching : The Statistics Rhinos were once abundant throughout Africa and Asia with an approximated worldwide population of 500 000. However, poaching of this iconic species is dramatically increasing, pushing the remain- ing rhinos closer towards extinction. In fact, all five remaining rhinos species are listed on the IUCN Redlist of threatened species, with three out of five species classified as critically endangered. Rhino poaching has reached a crisis point, and if the killing continues at this rate, we could see rhino deaths overtaking births in 2016-2018, meaning rhinos could go extinct in the very near future. Data published by South African Department of Environmental Affairs (2015)
  6. 6. Nepal has a different story towards poaching On World Wildlife Day, March 3 2013, Nepal celebrated 365 days with zero poaching. It’s the sec- ond year of such success in Nepal. In 2011 the country also had none, and in 2012 it lost just one rhino to poaching. Good News for Animals in Nepal: A Full Year Without Poaching 2005 375 2011 534 2015 64521% This achievement is particularly notable in the face of increased poaching in Af- rica. Nepal’s record stands out. Nepal continues its successful fight against poaching. No rhinos, tigers, or elephants were killed.
  7. 7. Threats for Rhinos Poaching for Rhino Horns 1.Traditional Chinese Medicine Rhino horn has been used in Chinese medicine for more than 2000 and is used to treat fever, rheumatism, gout, and other disorders. 2. For Jambiya Handles Made into ornamental handles for daggers (jambiyas). 3. Aphrodisiac There is a belief in the West that rhino horn is used as an aphrodisiac and sexual stimulant but this is not correct and seems to have been misunderstood or misinterpreted by Western media. Habitat Loss Habitat loss is a major threat to rhino popu- lations. There are several ways in which this is manifested including clearance of land for human settlement and agricultural production, logging, authorised and illegal. In the case of the Sumatran rhino habitat loss has been a major factor in rhino numbers de- clining. Sumatran rhinos are now highly frag- mented from each other, declining the chances of breeding and recovering their numbers even more. Political Conflict It has become much easier for the poachers to kill rhinos and other endangered species where there is political instability.
  8. 8. REASONS TO SAVE RHINOS At the turn of the 19th century, there were approximately one million rhinos. In 1970, there were around 70,000. Today, there are only around 28,000 rhinos surviving in the wild. 40 Million Year Rhinos have been around for 40 million years. Rhinos have been an important part of a wide range of ecosystems. Humans are the cause of the drastic drop in rhino popula- tions, therefore we have a moral obligation to stop their demise and ensure the survival of this species. Umberlla Speices When protecting and managing a rhino population, rangers and sci- entists take in account all the other species interacting with rhinos and those sharing the same habitat. We all have an opportunity to get involved! Many people don’t know that rhinos are critically endangered. We can help raise awareness of the plight of the rhino! The more we do all together, the more people will learn about rhinos and the more field projects we will be able to support. If people do not know about these amazing animals and the problems they are facing, how can we expect them to want to do something to help save rhinos?
  9. 9. Illegal Trade in Rhino Horn Rhinos are being killed in record numbers for their horns. To find and kill them, poachers are using a variety of tools and techniques. But so are the people fighting to save them.
  10. 10. Backing Rhinos to Survive www.nepalvisiontreks.com 977-1-4424762, 977-1-4423297 info@nepalvisiontreks.com The Slide is produced by Nepal Vision Treks & Expedition, an Adventure-travel specialist in Nepal, Tibet, Bhutan and India. “An initiative for ethical tourism.” /nepalvision /nepalvisiontrek /nvtreks /+Nepalvisiontreks

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