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Managing Project Change Like a Boss

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Managing Project Change Like a Boss

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Change happens. In today’s global world, change happens faster and more frequently than ever and consequently that means projects experience constant change.

While rapid response and flexibility are critical to competitive response, stakeholders making that change do not always move at the same speed. Understanding the change process from a behavioral perspective we and others experience will ease the facilitation of that change.

Change happens. In today’s global world, change happens faster and more frequently than ever and consequently that means projects experience constant change.

While rapid response and flexibility are critical to competitive response, stakeholders making that change do not always move at the same speed. Understanding the change process from a behavioral perspective we and others experience will ease the facilitation of that change.

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Managing Project Change Like a Boss

  1. 1. 1 Your presenter is: Alison Sigmon, M.Ed., PMP Managing Change In an Ever Changing Project World
  2. 2. What’s on tap for our time together today… 2  Change is all around us  Types of change – it’s not always bad!  Effective change needs leadership and process  Change process described  Application of the change process  Wrap it up! Change happens. In today’s global world, change happens faster and more frequently than ever and consequently that means projects experience constant change. While rapid response and flexibility are critical to competitive response, stakeholders making that change do not always move at the same speed. Understanding the change process from a behavioral perspective we experience and others experience will ease the facilitation of that change. Agenda
  3. 3. 3 Change – the only constant in projects Impact on you and others
  4. 4. 4 From strategy to reports to documentation to relationships, project managers experience a bevy of challenges that require a wide range of skills.  Work through others to get work done  Get results in nearly impossible conditions and situations  Manage without authority  Spend 80 to 90 percent of time communicating  Navigate and leverage politics  Build and support project relationships  Facilitate stakeholder interaction and contributions  Analyze data  Sell ideas and solutions  Manage conflict Juggling never ends
  5. 5. 5 Things can get REALLY complicated! And when you throw change into the mix…
  6. 6. 6 Change is a huge part of managing projects, and our attitude about it will drive the results and response to it. We’d love for our plan to be etched in stone, but the reality is that it simply can’t be. Anyone who has managed a project knows that the farther we look out at our project schedule, the less accurate the plan will be. This is the premise of Rolling Wave planning. There are just too many variables and unknowns to prevent changes from happening. Change is all around us…
  7. 7. 7 With the evolution of technology, today’s business climate has changed to keep pace. The ability to manage and respond to change fast is now the norm rather than the exception for a business to remain competitive. Rapid change is here to stay… Change is moving faster…
  8. 8. 8 Change helps companies respond to shifting trends, but in the project trenches change can be experienced as a disturbance to our way of seeing and doing things. Stakeholder tolerance for change varies. It’s important to be able to envision and communicate the possibilities of the big picture while managing the emotions that surround the upheaval of change. Let’s take a look at how change may be viewed. Change requires balance…
  9. 9. 9 The attitude that you and other key stakeholders bring to the project affect how others respond. How do you and the stakeholders on your project view change?  Does it feel like an interruption to stability or the start of a journey  Perhaps it seems like a response to a disturbance or a path to innovation  Maybe it is immediately experienced as a problem or seen as a great opportunity Attitude can make or break…
  10. 10. 10 Thriving on change is fundamental to success as a project manager. Understanding the nature of change allows us to work with it instead of against it. But is all change bad??? Leveraging change to lessen stress…
  11. 11. 11 Types of change No, fortunately not all change is bad… There are two types of change: Eustress – This is a type of change that is experienced as positive. You may feel excitement and motivating energy or anxiousness. Landing a new job or project, getting married, or buying a home are examples. Distress – This type of change is usually experienced as negative. You might feel upset, unsettled, or angry. Schedule cuts, scope changes, and delivering bad news are examples.
  12. 12. 12 Changing conditions The way you and others view change drives two main things: • How quickly the change is responded to • How fast stakeholders bounce back from the initial news of change What can help? Understanding and respecting the process…
  13. 13. 13 Managing change as a process Process will pull you through
  14. 14. 14 Change needs leadership and leadership needs process… Whatever kind of change you have on your project, it’s likely going to present some challenge which means it’s also going to need leadership. For change leadership to be effective, vision and process are needed. Processes give us a touchstone that is a reliable and consistent point of reference as we move through uncertain times. Touchstone for uncertainty
  15. 15. 15 Stages of change Being familiar with a change process can help you and your stakeholders move through the emotions associated with it. While there are lots of change management models out there, this is fast and easy to understand.
  16. 16. 16 When chaos hits…experience When people first learn of a change, it can feel a bit chaotic. They may experience the following: • Swirl of emotions - Some strong, others not - Some positive, others not • Overwhelming change may cause numbness.
  17. 17. 17 If it’s not a crisis situation, giving time for everyone to process the change will help them respond to it in the long run. It doesn’t have to be long and protracted. Just give a bit of time for the information to sink it. After all, it is new to them. Consider the following: • Focus on the feelings • Talk about it with others • Express your feelings about the change in appropriate ways When chaos hits…managing it
  18. 18. 18 Finding clarity…experience This stage is like when the dust settles after a violent wind storm. Information about the change has sunk in and people can process it. Consider the following: • Change is incomplete • Idea may seems disjointed and not cohesive • Uncertainty is normal • Team begins to assess the implications and impact of the change
  19. 19. 19 Finding clarity…managing it Before putting a plan in motion, some people may need time to let go of the “old” way of doing and thinking about things. Consider doing the following: • Honor the past • Research and gather information • Visualize the future
  20. 20. 20 The Creativity Stage is a sign of some level of acceptance about the change. This is when people are beginning to think about how to meet the needs and demands of the change. When moving through this stage, consider the following: • Deeper understanding is established. Begin to “think outside the box” • Team starts to consider how to respond to the change • Questions are asked and challenges are faced in light of the new reality Feeling creativity…experience
  21. 21. 21 Feeling creativity…managing it The best way to facilitate stakeholders through this stage is to focus on the intention of the change. Rules are typically relaxed during this stage while people run their cycles on how best to respond. Consider doing the following: • Think outside your traditional role • De-emphasize the hierarchy of the organization • Find ways to stimulate new ways of looking at the situation • “Play” with ideas and options – this is the time when almost anything goes
  22. 22. 22 Living continuity…experience In this stage, stakeholders are beginning to live the “new” normal. The change is integrated and people assume a “business as usual” attitude. When moving through this stage, consider the following: • Move from the turbulence of change to the new work reality • New ways of working & behaving are established • People look for ways to fine-tune • Positive talk emerges
  23. 23. 23 Living continuity…managing it This is a very organic stage that cannot be forced. The nice aspect of this stage is it’s like a breather or a rest after what was likely a challenging and even stormy period. Consider doing the following: • Allow the continuity stage to occur naturally • Not everyone hits this stage at exactly the same time • Understand this stage will not last forever
  24. 24. 24 Stage experience & management considerations As you move forward with using this model, keep these things in mind: • Stages do not always go in order • Stages cannot ultimately be eliminated • Stages can be re-visited • Stages may involve resistance • There might be some stakeholders who can’t get to this stage
  25. 25. 25 Closing thoughts on change Survival of the fittest
  26. 26. 26 A PM’s work is never done… Project managers wear a lot of hats that require a variety of skills… Analysis Documentation Budgeting Communication Teamwork Intelligence Steadiness Time Management
  27. 27. 27 Awareness of the change experience and a process for managing it is just another way to keep a handle on the many things you do day in and day out to make your project a success. Practicing process makes perfect (well, almost )
  28. 28. Wrap up… 28 Questions??? Change happens. In today’s global world, change happens faster and more frequently than ever and consequently that means projects experience constant change. While rapid response and flexibility are critical to competitive response, stakeholders making that change do not always move at the same speed. Understanding the change process from a behavioral perspective we and others experience will ease the facilitation of that change. What we discussed  Change is all around us  Types of change – it’s not always bad!  Effective change needs leadership and process  Change process described  Application of the change process  Wrap it up!
  29. 29. Thank you! www.systemation.com Alison Sigmon, M.Ed, LPC, PMP asigmon@systemation.com Twitter @alisonsigmon www.slideshare.net/ahsigmon www.mindscraping.com 29

Notes de l'éditeur

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  • http://www.enterprise-pm.com/7-key-skills-of-a-project-manager
  • 1 January 2016

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