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Morality and narrative persuasion

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How and where moral intuitions interact with story features to impact attention to and learning from narratives.

Publié dans : Formation, Technologie
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Morality and narrative persuasion

  1. 1. Morality and narrativepersuasionAllison EdenVU University Amsterdam
  2. 2. Outline of talk• Why Morality ?• How Morality?• Morality and narrative persuasion– 3 intersections of morals and persuasion
  3. 3. • We like it when…– Good things happen to good people– Bad things happen to bad people• We dislike it when…– Good things happen to bad people– Bad things happen to good people
  4. 4. Zillmann, 2000, p 60-61“In order to predict more accurately whichretributive events foster delight andwhich repugnance in whom, it will benecessary to stake out existing moralitysubcultures and to determine thejudgmental properties that characterizeand distinguish them.“
  5. 5. Moral Foundations Theory (MFT)
  6. 6. MFT and US Politics1. Harm/care2. Fairness/reciprocity3. Ingroup/loyalty4. Authority/respect5. Purity/sanctity(Haidt & Graham, in press, SJR)(Compassion, Peace)(Equality, Justice)(Patriotism, Solidarity)(Obedience, Duty)(Chastity, Wholesomeness)LiberalsConservatives
  7. 7. Enjoyment of morally salientnarratives
  8. 8. Interaction betweenBroad Moral Domain and Trait Progressivismx = 49 x = -2 x = -13-0.06-0.010.040.090.14Progressives ConservativesRight Temporal Pole-0.18-0.13-0.08-0.030.020.07Progressives ConservativesLeft Precuneus-0.18-0.13-0.08-0.030.020.07Liberal ConservativesLeft Superior Frontal GyrusAutonomy CommunityLiberal Liberal
  9. 9. Morality and narrative persuasion• Two premises–We are affected most by content that ismorally relevant to us–We can be moved by this content to changeour behavior or attitudes
  10. 10. Morality and persuasion• Fiction as simulation• Emotional effects• Transportation
  11. 11. Story as simulation
  12. 12. Narrative∆Non-Narrative∆F pCare 0.07 -0.07 6.89 0.01Fairness 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.92Loyalty 0.09 0.00 4.16 0.04Authority 0.09 0.00 2.05 0.16Purity 0.08 0.02 2.22 0.14
  13. 13. Some questions for“story as simulation”• Is this simply social cognitive theory orpriming?
  14. 14. Some questions for“story as simulation”• What must be made salient?• What content works?• Is it the simulation or the message?• How much exposure is required?• Does this translate beyond the moral itself tobehavior (or behavioral intentions?)
  15. 15. CarePurity
  16. 16. Is it relevant? Is it emotional?Care = 1Purity = 0Elevationb = 1.42**CareSaliencePuritySalienceb = .31 b = .09, nsInt x b = .55** Int x b = -.15, ns∆R2 = .03*
  17. 17. Content x relevance x emotion =behavioral intentionCare = 1Purity = 0Elevation Pro-socialIntentions-1 SD: b = .97 **Care M: b = 1.27 **+1 SD: b = 1.57 **CareSalienceb = .25, nsInt x b = .48**
  18. 18. CareHello!
  19. 19. Content x relevance x emotion =behavioral intentionCare = 1Control = 0Elevation Pro-socialIntentionsResidual direct effect = -.81*-1 SD: b = .24 **Care M: b = .47 **+1 SD: b = .69 **CareSalienceInt x b = 1.34**
  20. 20. • Some evidence that moral intuitions canbe combined with entertainment andemotion models to predict behavior• But are there other mechanisms viawhich morality may affect attitudechange via stories besides socialemulation and particular moralemotions?
  21. 21. Transportation
  22. 22. Group affiliation
  23. 23. In conclusion….
  24. 24. Thanks for listening!Collaborators:Ron Tamborini, Michigan State U.Matthew Grizzard, U. BuffaloNicholas D. Bowman, West Virginia U.Robert Lewis, U. TexasRene Weber, UCSBPaul Skalski U. CincinnatiTilo Hartmann, Jolien Arendsen, Bo vanGrisvan, Gino Mulder, Jeroen Wolper, VUUniversity

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