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FGP Tech - APPA Conference - September 2015

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FGP Tech - APPA Conference - September 2015

  1. 1. Technology Workforce Challenges Facing Public Power
  2. 2. • A division of Find Great People, FGP Tech is a Greenville, SC headquartered IT Recruiting & Staffing firm. We assist companies nationwide in searches from the executive level down all the way to helpdesk • We are here because Public Power serves the greater community and it is our civic responsibility to ensure you know and can prepare for the challenges facing you pertaining to your IT workforce So who is FGP Tech and why are we here?
  3. 3. What that really means… • We are directly engaged with candidates and know what they are looking for in their careers • We have our fingers on the pulse of what skills are “hot” within the market and have the most current salary data available • Above all, we follow hiring trends as well as future forecasting specific to the IT industry This means that we are seeing both today and tomorrow’s pain points for Public Power… a severe shortage of IT talent
  4. 4. Drivers influencing the IT workforce The CloudSTEM BI IoTMillenials These factors and more are influencing your utility
  5. 5. So what is STEM… Science Technology Engineering Mathematics And now there is STEAM (which includes Art)
  6. 6. By the numbers… • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Computer and Information Technology occupations are projected to grow by 22 percent from 2010 to 2020! • More than half of all projected jobs in STEM elds arefi related to IT • Exploring Computer Science reported that the percentage of US high school students taking STEM courses has increased, but that it has dropped from 25% to 19% for Computer Science In short there are more IT-related jobs being created, but less children going into Computer Science-related majors
  7. 7. In addition… • Baby Boomers continue to leave the workforce • Tighter immigration laws and “in-sourcing” has impacted the available talent pool • The U.S. continues to slide in global rankings with regards to Math, Reading, and Science So, demand is increasing while supply is decreasing. At the same time we are falling behind in the key subject areas that directly correlate to Computer Science
  8. 8. At the same time… • Innovation is occurring at record pace (ex. operating system upgrades moving from 5 years to a continuous release models) • The number of product offerings and/or the increase of functionality are greater than ever before (creation of the need to specialize) • Reliance on technology has increased (we want it at all our fingertips and we want it all right now) • Cyber threats continue to grow
  9. 9. Three key innovation movements within IT • Business Intelligence (BI) • The Cloud • Internet of Things (IoT)
  10. 10. Business Intelligence (BI) • Business users increased demand real-time reporting and analytics • It is now easier to combine data from varied sources into one database • BI is moving in the direction of using natural language to empower end users to easily create their own reports/dashboards • BI is enabling organizations to automate decision-making
  11. 11. BI challenges • One of the hottest skills sets in the market, so that means it is a very expensive hire • If the initial data architecture is not done correctly it can become a money pit • The end user demands and desires continue to change and become a moving target • When dealing with complex algorithms there is a very real risk for human error
  12. 12. The Cloud • The move from on-premise to being web-based • Smaller organizations can now have enterprise-like capabilities • Cost is generally minimal when compared to “owning” it in- house • Updates and feature enhancements are generally free • Employees can typically access services/applications with greater ease when offsite
  13. 13. Cloud challenges • You don’t control when/how changes are made • Cyberattacks (vulnerability to DDoS attacks) • The Cloud has not been standardized (there are no clear- cut guidelines) • Business continuity (what happens when you lose access to the internet) • Many organizations don’t even know their terms and conditions with their Cloud providers (data ownership, disaster recovery guarantees, compliances met, conditions of termination, etc.)
  14. 14. The Internet of Things (IoT) • With everything connected you can control anything from anywhere • More points of data collection means more opportunities to make numerically supported decisions • Increased efficiency (be it time, automation, etc.) • Opens up a new realm of potential revenue streams
  15. 15. IoT challenges • More interconnectivity increases potential for large-scale attacks that could cripple US infrastructure • With no universal language or protocol compatibility will be an issue • More opportunity for device failures and domino effects
  16. 16. The Millennials are here • Millennials span 1982-2004 and have already surpassed Generation X to be the largest make up within the labor force • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics 53% of all managers say that it’s difficult to find and retain Millennials • 58% of Millennials expect to stay in their jobs less than 3 years (Generation X has averaged 5 years and Baby Boomers has averaged 7 years) • 69% of Millennials stated that they would choose to freelance if they knew that they could find enough work
  17. 17. What motivates Millennials • According to Deloitte’s Millennial Survey, 78% of Millennials are strongly influenced by how innovative a company is • Flexibility in the workplace and non-traditional work schedules • Millennials like collaborative environments • Motivated by career growth and development opportunities • Look for organizations that give back to the community • Money, surprisingly, isn’t their biggest motivator
  18. 18. Ask yourselves Look yourself in the mirror and give yourself an honest assessment… •Do we have any current IT hiring needs? •Are there any planned IT team loses we anticipate over the next 2 years? •Do we invest enough in IT and technology (would it excite someone to work here)? •Do we have a company culture that people want to be a part of? •What do we do for the community at large?
  19. 19. Let’s review the challenges that impact hiring •There is a severe and growing IT talent shortage •Technology is changing at breakneck speed •Organizations continue to rely more and more on technology and analytics to drive efficiency/revenues •The Millennials are vastly different than proceeding generations and so are the things that they are looking for
  20. 20. There are solutions •Concentrate on retention (it is almost always less costly) •Create contingency plans •Stop treating IT like a cost center and start treating it like an efficiency and revenue center •Monetize IT by offering aggregate IT services and look to similar organizations to augment talent/skill gaps •Ensure that you are committed to innovation, quality of life, and a service driven culture. Ask yourself, “do we offer those 3 things”
  21. 21. Retaining talent •Evaluate compensation and benefits structure – You don’t have to be a market leader, but you cannot lag behind either – Know what every person on your team could make on the open market (trust me, firms like us are calling them every day) •Listen to your employees and what motivates them – Poll your workforce to learn what they like and don’t like •Invest in their growth – Trainings/certifications relevant to their roles – Look for ways to expand their roles (lead projects, part of cross- functional teams/boards, etc., teach them the business, etc.) •Create a culture of treating people fairly, not equally – Top producers can earn right to work from home – Quarterly reviews with top grades earn an extra day off – Discretionary bonuses
  22. 22. Contingency planning •Are you following IT best practices… – Extensive documentation – Know your vendors and whether they offer consulting services (Staffing Firms and Managed Services Providers are additional potential solutions) – 3rd party IT health checks/audits •Cross-train employees to create redundancies •If you know someone is retiring consider bringing their replacement early for a 3-6 month overlap
  23. 23. Invest in technology •If you do not invest in technology you will lose talent •User “power in numbers” to drive down technology costs – Know what the pricing breaks are for various expenditures – Many industries are creating GPOs to increase negotiating power to reduce IT spend •Teach IT employees about the ROI of technology purchases – They will be happier if they are part of the of the decision-making process – Employees will better understand not making an IT purchase that has a poor ROI
  24. 24. Think outside the box •Offer aggregate IT services – Offer municipalities/customers MSP-like services (red tape and inability to generate revenue has left many of them with very real IT needs) – This can turn IT into a revenue center and pay for additional headcount and technology investments •Create partnerships to augment deficiencies – Split costs/time for employees – Swap or outsource to someone who already knows your industry
  25. 25. Change your brand You have to be a “brand” that people want to be a part of… •Innovation: Commitment to technology doesn’t always mean more money, it means openness to doing things differently •Quality of Life: Work-life balance, flexible scheduling (think sick children work from home forgiveness), paternal child leave, nursing care leave, including adoption benefits •Service Culture: Be an organization that gives back to the community, allow for volunteer opportunities during work hours, Computer Science outreach at the K-12 level
  26. 26. Hiring best practices •Interview, but always sell your organization – People like to feel wanted •Know your strengths and weaknesses, but share both – Being genuine and transparent wins candidates over because so many places don’t operate that way •Hire attitude and aptitude, skills can be taught – Don’t get caught in the “perfect” candidate trap •Don’t forget about internship programs – You can model these programs a number of ways to lock down future employees
  27. 27. Blake Coleman Business Development – FGP Tech www.fgptech.com Direct: 864-553-7222 E-mail: blake@fgptech.com Twitter: @FGPTech http://www.slideshare.net/blake_coleman/fgp- tech-appa-conference-september-2015

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