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SIDS
AGRI-FOOD CHALLENGES
& OPPORTUNITIES
LEN ISHMAEL
BRUSSELS
STRUCTURE OF CONVERSATION
A. SIDS & THEIR CHARACTERISTICS
B. SYSTEMIC ISSUES RELATED TO SIZE
C: CLIMATE EMERGENCY
HOW THES...
IDENTIFICATION OF SIDS AS A SPECIAL GROUP
OF
DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
FIRST GLOBAL CONFERENCE ON SUSTAINABLE
DEVELOPMENT OF SM...
59 COUNTRIES : 69.9 M POPULATION: <1%
WP
GENERALLY NOT AMONG THE POOREST OF
THE POOR
 Many SIDS have achieved relatively high human development
indices
 64% are ...
SIDS/PARADISE/BEAUTY
PARADISE IS ALSO A FACADE
SIDs face real challenges in the bid to seek
development, modernize societies and to ensure the
...
SYSTEMIC CHARACTERISTICS
IMPLICATIONS FOR DEVELOPMENT
• ENVIRONMENTALLY FRAGILE ECOSYSTEMS
• NARROW RESOURCE BASE
• HIGHLY...
SOME - THE PACIFIC ISLANDS - REMOTE
EXTRAORDINARILY VULNERABLE
ENVIRONMENTALLY & ECONOMICALLY
Location in tropics – exceptionally vulnerable to tropical cyclo...
SIGNIFICANT GDP IMPACT
Example: 2004: CAT 5 Hurricane Ivan in Grenada - 20 hours –
Damages US$900 million - 200% GDP
Cat 5...
SOCIAL & ECONOMIC VULNERABILITIES
• Among the most highly indebted countries in the world
• Highly open economies vulnerab...
DEFINING CHARACTERISTIC - SIZE
Within the SIDS Grouping:
Size is a relative concept – Cuba 11.4 Million
Niue 1610.
SIZE – CONSTRAINING FACTOR
• Small size – constrains size of domestic markets, high per unit
cost of production & inputs s...
MINI – CASE STUDY 1
GREEN GOLD: THE CASE OF
WINDWARD ISLAND BANANAS
A POLICY ISSUE – TOOL FOR SOCIAL
MOBILITY
• In 1960’s & 70’s Eastern Caribbean Countries purchased
plantations owned by UK...
RADICAL TRANSFORMATION OF RURAL LIFE
• Feeder Roads & solid homes built
• Farmers purchased trucks to take crop to ports
•...
LOADING THE BANANA
BOAT
GREEN GOLD - BUT LACK OF SCALE
• Windward island Bananas – represented < 0.04% of world
production of bananas
• Caribbean ...
RELATIVELY SMALL OUTPUT BUT BIG LOCAL
IMPACT
• 25,000 farmers with huge multiplier effects
• Represented 50% of exports fo...
IN 1993 EU ANNOUNCED PREFERENTIAL
TREATMENT FOR BANANAS FROM FORMER
COLONIES
• US – a non banana producer - took EU to WTO...
DOLLAR BANANAS VS SMALL SCALE
FARMERS
• Caribbean Av farm size 1.5 acres (0.6 ha)
• VS Ecuador: 5000 farmers – 300,000 acr...
EU LOSS AT WTO
COLLAPSE OF BANANA PRODUCTION
• Without preferential access – Caribbean small producers unable
to compete w...
COMPETITION IS CHALLENGING FOR SIDS
Similar story for Caribbean Sugar.
STK and Nevis dependency ratio of HH dependent on s...
CHALLENGES EXIST, BUT SO DO
OPPORTUNITIES TOURISM - AGRICULTURAL
LINKAGES
Makes sense – tourism vital sector for islands –...
“The Tourism industry mainly relies on food imports as opposed
to accessing the local market. Despite many years – little ...
A VITAL LINK NOT FULLY EXPLOITED
CASE EASTERN CARIBBEAN
Eastern Caribbean States Tourism Sector demand
Less than 30% suppl...
UNEXPLOITED: YACHTING SECTOR
Example:
MULTIMILLION DOLLAR YACHING INDUSTRY - BVI – GREAT SOUCE OF
DEMAND FOR FRESH FOODS, ...
FOR MANY SIDS – CHALLENGES FACE
AGRICULTURAL SECTOR
TRANSPORTATION AS AN IMPEDEMENT TO INTRA-REGIONAL
TRADE WELL DOCUMENTE...
MANY SIDS: AGRICULTURE
CHARACTERISTICS
• STILL LOW LEVELS OF TECHNOLOGY, ENTREPRENEURSHIP
• LOW PRODUCTIVITY
• LOW CAPACIT...
OTHER ELEMENTS
• AVERAGE AGE OF FARMERS IS 55+
• SOCIETAL MIND SET – WORK IN AGRICULTURE MENIAL
• SOCIETIES HAVE EVOLVED T...
HIGH IMPORT FOOD BILLS
EXAMPLE CARICOM:
FOOD IMPORTS - $2.08 B - $ 4.25 B 2011 – ON TARGET TO HIT
$8-10 B 2020.
HIGH IMPORT FOOD BILLS - COSTS?
CROWDING OUT DOMESTIC AGRICULTURE
BURDEN ON CURRENCY EXCHANGE RESERVES
INCREASING PROCESSE...
AGRICULTURE UNEVEN CONTRIBUTION TO
GDP
Agriculture represents 2 % of GDP in the Bahamas – 36% to Papua
New Guinea
AVERAGE ...
INVERSE CORRELATION
GDP/CAPITA AND SHARE OF AGRIC IN GDP
2: SIDS & CLIMATE CHANGE
FRONTLINE OF CLIMATE EMERGENCY
A TICKING CLOCK
CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESETS A SYSTEMIC THREAT FOR SID...
LITERALLY SINKING
VULNERABILITY – KEY CHARACTERISTIC OF
SIDS
HARD HIT BY THE GLOBAL FINANCIAL CRISIS OF 2008–2010
THE FOOD AND FUEL CRISES O...
CLIMATE CHAGE HAS DEEPENED
VULNERABILITY
Climate Change existential threat – to PACIFIC ISLANDS
TUVALU, NAURU, KIRABTI, MA...
CLIMATE SCIENCE NOTES
• MORE EXTREME WEATHER EVENTS: DROUGHT, FLOODS,
CYCLONES
MOVEMENT OF BIOME ALREADY AFFECTING 25% OF ...
2017 – COSTLIEST PERIOD IN CARIBBEAN
HISTORY
10 Hurricanes
6 Major Hurricanes (CAT3+)
3,364 deaths
Approx. $295 billion
SI...
GLOBAL TEMPERATURES TO INCREASE
1985-2009 WORLD AVERAGE 0.13C
EASTERN CARIBBEAN 0.27C
IMPACTS ON SEA TEMPERATURES, CORALS,
FISHERIES
POOREST COUNTRIES MOST AT RISK
Within regions, the poorest communities and
populations typically are the most vulnerable t...
ADAPTATION HAS BEEN ONGOING – BUT
PACE AND SCALE NEED TO INCREASE
SIGNIFICANTLY
ADAPTATION COULD FACE TECHNICAL LIMITS AND...
AGRICULTURE – SECTOR MOST
SUSCEPTIBLE TO CLIMATE CHANGE
IMPACTS ON AGRICULTURE
● Increases in agricultural pests and diseases
● Effect of extreme events on agricultural infrastru...
• Reduction in crop yields
● Damage to agricultural infrastructure and assets
● Mass disruption to food security
● Loss of...
IMPACTS ON THE BLUE ECONOMY:
LOSS OF MARINE RESOURCES DUE TO DESTRUCTION OF
SPAWNING GROUNDS
VALUABLE RESOURCE!
Capture fisheries are the wealth of many SIDS especially in
the Pacific SIDS, where fisheries can contr...
CHALLENGE TO INCREASE SHARE LANDED
BY SIDS
Share actually taken by SIDS domestic fleets and/or
processed in SIDS facilitie...
STEPS ARE BEING TAKEN
IN OCTOBER 2019 VANUATU ANNOUNCED PLANS TO EXPORT 1.5
TONNES OF YELLOWFIN AND BLUEFIN TUNE/WEEK TO U...
FAO ASSESSMENT: CARIBBEAN NEEDS BLUE
REVOLUTION
Paper on fisheries and aquaculture suggests that a Caribbean
Blue Revoluti...
BLUE GROWTH INITIATIVES
• Aquaculture has been proposed as a way to BOOST food
security for Pacific SIDS.
• Legal and tech...
SKILLS, TECHNOLOGY & INFRASTRUCTURE
GREATER INVESTMENTS IN SKILLS, TECHNOLOGY &
INFRASTRUCTURE
Science-based standards for...
EXPLOITING LINKS BETWEEN TOURISM &
MARINE ENVIRONMENT
Greater support to SIDS in promoting ecotourism and
sustainable use ...
TOURISM & THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT
• Cooperatives established to manage manatee stocks in Belize.
• Fiji combining tourist r...
MODEL OF LOMBOK ISLAND - INDONESIA
Blue Growth implementation in Lombok Island, Indonesia has
been suggested as model for ...
AGRI -TECH & SIDS?
Technology has its place in aiding progress in Agriculture – much
discussion on climate resistant varie...
Many opportunities already exist which
have not yet been fully exploited
SPECIFICALLY TARGET SMALL PRODUCERS
• PROVIDE TECHNICAL AND FINANCIAL SUPPORT TO ACHIEVE
COMMERCIALIZATION & INCLUSION IN ...
STRENGTHEN
DOMESTIC & REGIONAL MARKETS
• STRENGTHEN LINKS BETWEEN DOMESTIC AGRICULTURE &
TOURISM
• BUILD & EXPLOIT REGIONA...
OPPORTUNITIES EXIST TO DO MORE WITH
WHAT EXISTS
• EDUCATE CONSUMERS – HEALTH BENEFITS TO EATING AND
BUYING LOCAL
• EDUCATE...
FINAL REFLECTIONS?
Behind the myth of paradise – are real people, with real
lives, needing jobs and looking to make ends m...
FOR SIDS CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES
WILL ALWAYS EXIST
Sometimes In Scoping Far And Wide For Opportunities –
We Fail To Exp...
THANK YOU!
Brussels Briefings n.60; Len Ishmael: What agrifood challenges and opportunities ahead for Small-Island Developing States?
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Brussels Briefings n.60; Len Ishmael: What agrifood challenges and opportunities ahead for Small-Island Developing States?

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The Brussels Development Briefing n.60 on “The future of food and agricultural transformation” organised by CTA, the European Commission/EuropeAid, the ACP Secretariat and CONCORD was held on Wednesday 26 February 2020 (9h00-13h00) at the ACP Secretariat, Avenue Georges Henri 451, 1200 Brussels.
The briefing presented trends and discussed the sustainable and healthy food systems, the future of work in agriculture and the need for new skills in very complex food chains, the effects of disruptive innovations, fair and inclusive value chains and trade.
The audience was made up of ACP-EU policy-makers and representatives of the EU Member States, civil society groups, research networks and development practitioners, the private sector and international organisations based in Brussels as well as representatives from ACP regional organisations.

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Brussels Briefings n.60; Len Ishmael: What agrifood challenges and opportunities ahead for Small-Island Developing States?

  1. 1. SIDS AGRI-FOOD CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES LEN ISHMAEL BRUSSELS
  2. 2. STRUCTURE OF CONVERSATION A. SIDS & THEIR CHARACTERISTICS B. SYSTEMIC ISSUES RELATED TO SIZE C: CLIMATE EMERGENCY HOW THESE AFFECT THE AGRICULTURAL SECTOR
  3. 3. IDENTIFICATION OF SIDS AS A SPECIAL GROUP OF DEVELOPING COUNTRIES FIRST GLOBAL CONFERENCE ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF SMALL ISLAND DEVELOPING STATES 1994 & THE BPA.
  4. 4. 59 COUNTRIES : 69.9 M POPULATION: <1% WP
  5. 5. GENERALLY NOT AMONG THE POOREST OF THE POOR  Many SIDS have achieved relatively high human development indices  64% are Middle Income  Highest concentration in the Caribbean all, except Haiti are middle income countries
  6. 6. SIDS/PARADISE/BEAUTY
  7. 7. PARADISE IS ALSO A FACADE SIDs face real challenges in the bid to seek development, modernize societies and to ensure the well being of their people.
  8. 8. SYSTEMIC CHARACTERISTICS IMPLICATIONS FOR DEVELOPMENT • ENVIRONMENTALLY FRAGILE ECOSYSTEMS • NARROW RESOURCE BASE • HIGHLY DEPENDENT ON THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FOR GOODS & SERVICES • HIGH RATIOS OF SEA TO LAND MASS
  9. 9. SOME - THE PACIFIC ISLANDS - REMOTE
  10. 10. EXTRAORDINARILY VULNERABLE ENVIRONMENTALLY & ECONOMICALLY Location in tropics – exceptionally vulnerable to tropical cyclones – with their ability to wipe out years of GDP growth, housing & capital infrastructure – in a few hours
  11. 11. SIGNIFICANT GDP IMPACT Example: 2004: CAT 5 Hurricane Ivan in Grenada - 20 hours – Damages US$900 million - 200% GDP Cat 5 Topical Cyclone Pam – 2015 – damages to Vanuatu $692 + fatalities Hurricane Sandy East Coast USA – 2012 $70.2 Billion in USD 16.16 trillion GDP Impact on US GDP: 0.4%
  12. 12. SOCIAL & ECONOMIC VULNERABILITIES • Among the most highly indebted countries in the world • Highly open economies vulnerable to external shocks – impacts of 2008/09 financial markets collapse - Antigua & Barbuda - 12% Anguilla -18% . National Banks failed • High levels of unemployment • World Bank reports indicate some Caribbean SIDS have highest levels of youth unemployment – in the world ( close to 38% for some C’s)
  13. 13. DEFINING CHARACTERISTIC - SIZE Within the SIDS Grouping: Size is a relative concept – Cuba 11.4 Million Niue 1610.
  14. 14. SIZE – CONSTRAINING FACTOR • Small size – constrains size of domestic markets, high per unit cost of production & inputs such as capital, energy • Affects absorption capacity of technology • Implications for size of labor force, skills • Topography – further implications for development including agriculture • Lack of SCALE – Implications for competitiveness – absent of S & D measures
  15. 15. MINI – CASE STUDY 1 GREEN GOLD: THE CASE OF WINDWARD ISLAND BANANAS
  16. 16. A POLICY ISSUE – TOOL FOR SOCIAL MOBILITY • In 1960’s & 70’s Eastern Caribbean Countries purchased plantations owned by UK MNC – GEEST – divided into small holdings distributed to peasant farmers – to lift people out of poverty, create an asset owning class with prospects for social mobility and good livelihoods • Banana production viable for GEEST since they owned all plantations in the EC, with vertical integration - transportation – ships – distributors, capital – Labor was the variable input.
  17. 17. RADICAL TRANSFORMATION OF RURAL LIFE • Feeder Roads & solid homes built • Farmers purchased trucks to take crop to ports • Kids went to school – they wore shoes • Stabilized rural – urban drift
  18. 18. LOADING THE BANANA BOAT
  19. 19. GREEN GOLD - BUT LACK OF SCALE • Windward island Bananas – represented < 0.04% of world production of bananas • Caribbean producers as a whole represented 3% of world exports and & 7% of EU banana imports • 300,000 tons/annum of 12 million produced/year • Cost of production – X2/3 times more than larger scale producers in Central America.
  20. 20. RELATIVELY SMALL OUTPUT BUT BIG LOCAL IMPACT • 25,000 farmers with huge multiplier effects • Represented 50% of exports for Dominica , 41% for the WI islands AV, and >50% labor in some islands
  21. 21. IN 1993 EU ANNOUNCED PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT FOR BANANAS FROM FORMER COLONIES • US – a non banana producer - took EU to WTO on behalf of Chiquita and Dole – citing discriminatory access for Caribbean bananas -Despite small size of holdings from the Caribbean which went mainly to UK market. • Chiquita and Dole main producers in Central America, different social model using peasant labor on vast plantations • CA supplied 94% of fresh bananas to USA
  22. 22. DOLLAR BANANAS VS SMALL SCALE FARMERS • Caribbean Av farm size 1.5 acres (0.6 ha) • VS Ecuador: 5000 farmers – 300,000 acres (125,000 ha)
  23. 23. EU LOSS AT WTO COLLAPSE OF BANANA PRODUCTION • Without preferential access – Caribbean small producers unable to compete with larger and cheaper Latin American countries • Results for WI catastrophic – farmers lost farms, trucks, homes , livelihoods -governments lost revenues – period of great economic, social and political instability
  24. 24. COMPETITION IS CHALLENGING FOR SIDS Similar story for Caribbean Sugar. STK and Nevis dependency ratio of HH dependent on sugar was 68% in early 2000’s. Dismantling of preferences devastating consequences for the political, economic and social security & stability of the islands
  25. 25. CHALLENGES EXIST, BUT SO DO OPPORTUNITIES TOURISM - AGRICULTURAL LINKAGES Makes sense – tourism vital sector for islands – replaced Sugar & Bananas in many islands - >50% GDP for some islands Significant demand for food from tourism plant Optimal for forward and backward linkages between agriculture – agro processing - tourism
  26. 26. “The Tourism industry mainly relies on food imports as opposed to accessing the local market. Despite many years – little success in supplying tourism demand from domestic production and value chains”
  27. 27. A VITAL LINK NOT FULLY EXPLOITED CASE EASTERN CARIBBEAN Eastern Caribbean States Tourism Sector demand Less than 30% supplied locally Hotelier complaints – unpredictability of supply, quality, and volume
  28. 28. UNEXPLOITED: YACHTING SECTOR Example: MULTIMILLION DOLLAR YACHING INDUSTRY - BVI – GREAT SOUCE OF DEMAND FOR FRESH FOODS, BANANAS & FLOWERS CHIQUITA & DOLE provisioned daily from Puerto Rico – YET THE BVI WAS A MEMBER OF THE REGION FIGHTING TO SALVAGE BANANAS YACHT COMPANIES CITED - WEAK REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION LINKAGES
  29. 29. FOR MANY SIDS – CHALLENGES FACE AGRICULTURAL SECTOR TRANSPORTATION AS AN IMPEDEMENT TO INTRA-REGIONAL TRADE WELL DOCUMENTED SECTOR CHARACTERISED BY MAINLY SMALL PRODUCERS – ACCESS TO CREDIT, SEEDS, REFRIDGERATED STORAGE, BETTER VARIETIES, IRRIGATION – DIFFICULT
  30. 30. MANY SIDS: AGRICULTURE CHARACTERISTICS • STILL LOW LEVELS OF TECHNOLOGY, ENTREPRENEURSHIP • LOW PRODUCTIVITY • LOW CAPACITY TO COMPY WITH MODERN FOOD SAFETY AND QUALITY STANDARDS • HIGH PRODUCTION COSTS & MARKETING
  31. 31. OTHER ELEMENTS • AVERAGE AGE OF FARMERS IS 55+ • SOCIETAL MIND SET – WORK IN AGRICULTURE MENIAL • SOCIETIES HAVE EVOLVED TASTES TOWARDS IMPORTED FOODS
  32. 32. HIGH IMPORT FOOD BILLS EXAMPLE CARICOM: FOOD IMPORTS - $2.08 B - $ 4.25 B 2011 – ON TARGET TO HIT $8-10 B 2020.
  33. 33. HIGH IMPORT FOOD BILLS - COSTS? CROWDING OUT DOMESTIC AGRICULTURE BURDEN ON CURRENCY EXCHANGE RESERVES INCREASING PROCESSED CONTENT HIGH LEVELS OF DIET RELATED NCD RURAL POVERTY LOSS OF JOBS
  34. 34. AGRICULTURE UNEVEN CONTRIBUTION TO GDP Agriculture represents 2 % of GDP in the Bahamas – 36% to Papua New Guinea AVERAGE 7-17% FOR THE CARIBBEAN OUTSIDE OF HAITI. INTRA REGIONAL TRADE IN AGRICULTURE < 17.3% 2000 – 12.7% 2010
  35. 35. INVERSE CORRELATION GDP/CAPITA AND SHARE OF AGRIC IN GDP
  36. 36. 2: SIDS & CLIMATE CHANGE FRONTLINE OF CLIMATE EMERGENCY A TICKING CLOCK CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESETS A SYSTEMIC THREAT FOR SIDS, GIVEN THEIR SIZE - AND FOR SOME – AN EXISTENTIAL THREAT
  37. 37. LITERALLY SINKING
  38. 38. VULNERABILITY – KEY CHARACTERISTIC OF SIDS HARD HIT BY THE GLOBAL FINANCIAL CRISIS OF 2008–2010 THE FOOD AND FUEL CRISES OF 2007–2008, AND NATURAL DISASTERS IN 2009–2010, 2015 - 2017 VERY LITTLE BY WAY OF SAFETY NETS TO CUSHION SHOCKS THEY ARE NOT ECONOMICALLY RESILIENT
  39. 39. CLIMATE CHAGE HAS DEEPENED VULNERABILITY Climate Change existential threat – to PACIFIC ISLANDS TUVALU, NAURU, KIRABTI, MALDIVES, MARSHALL ISLANDS – OTHERS • LOSS OF COASTAL INFRASTRUCTURE • DAMAGE TO NEAR COASTAL RESOURCES & ECOSYSTEMS
  40. 40. CLIMATE SCIENCE NOTES • MORE EXTREME WEATHER EVENTS: DROUGHT, FLOODS, CYCLONES MOVEMENT OF BIOME ALREADY AFFECTING 25% OF WORLD BY 2050 ALMOST EVERY COUNTRY AFFECTED – IMPACTS ON ECOSYSTEM SERVICES, HABITATS, LIVLIHOODS
  41. 41. 2017 – COSTLIEST PERIOD IN CARIBBEAN HISTORY 10 Hurricanes 6 Major Hurricanes (CAT3+) 3,364 deaths Approx. $295 billion SIDS in constant state of building & rebuilding even while owning public debt on capital infrastructure – private insurance scarce.
  42. 42. GLOBAL TEMPERATURES TO INCREASE
  43. 43. 1985-2009 WORLD AVERAGE 0.13C EASTERN CARIBBEAN 0.27C
  44. 44. IMPACTS ON SEA TEMPERATURES, CORALS, FISHERIES
  45. 45. POOREST COUNTRIES MOST AT RISK Within regions, the poorest communities and populations typically are the most vulnerable to climate events. They often lack financial means as well as support from public or private agencies.
  46. 46. ADAPTATION HAS BEEN ONGOING – BUT PACE AND SCALE NEED TO INCREASE SIGNIFICANTLY ADAPTATION COULD FACE TECHNICAL LIMITS AND COSTS HARD TRADE-OFFS NEED TO BE ASSESSED, INCLUDING “WHO AND WHAT TO PROTECT AND WHO AND WHAT TO RELOCATE.”
  47. 47. AGRICULTURE – SECTOR MOST SUSCEPTIBLE TO CLIMATE CHANGE
  48. 48. IMPACTS ON AGRICULTURE ● Increases in agricultural pests and diseases ● Effect of extreme events on agricultural infrastructure, livelihoods and assets ● Decrease in the availability of water resources ● Reduction in water quality due to saline intrusion into groundwater sources; ● Accelerated soil erosion due to the occurrence of extreme events (floods, hurricanes etc.); ● Reduction in soil fertility due to soil salinization caused by rising sea levels.
  49. 49. • Reduction in crop yields ● Damage to agricultural infrastructure and assets ● Mass disruption to food security ● Loss of employment and income ● Loss of foreign exchange ● Increased demand for foreign exchange for food import
  50. 50. IMPACTS ON THE BLUE ECONOMY: LOSS OF MARINE RESOURCES DUE TO DESTRUCTION OF SPAWNING GROUNDS
  51. 51. VALUABLE RESOURCE! Capture fisheries are the wealth of many SIDS especially in the Pacific SIDS, where fisheries can contribute as much as 10 percent of GDP. Of the 2.4 million tonnes of tuna caught in the Western Pacific Ocean, 1.4 million (58 percent) were taken in the waters of Pacific SIDS with a value of USD 2.8 billion.
  52. 52. CHALLENGE TO INCREASE SHARE LANDED BY SIDS Share actually taken by SIDS domestic fleets and/or processed in SIDS facilities remains relatively small.
  53. 53. STEPS ARE BEING TAKEN IN OCTOBER 2019 VANUATU ANNOUNCED PLANS TO EXPORT 1.5 TONNES OF YELLOWFIN AND BLUEFIN TUNE/WEEK TO USA/NZ THROUGH THE SINO VAN FISHERIES LT JOINT VENTURE
  54. 54. FAO ASSESSMENT: CARIBBEAN NEEDS BLUE REVOLUTION Paper on fisheries and aquaculture suggests that a Caribbean Blue Revolution is needed and possible. Aquaculture development can increase total fish production in the CARICOM states by 30 percent within 10 years Requirements? investments in enabling aquaculture policy and legal frameworks, supported by applied research, capacity building and information.
  55. 55. BLUE GROWTH INITIATIVES • Aquaculture has been proposed as a way to BOOST food security for Pacific SIDS. • Legal and technical support for aquaculture development is currently provided by the Network for Aquaculture in Micronesia (MASA).
  56. 56. SKILLS, TECHNOLOGY & INFRASTRUCTURE GREATER INVESTMENTS IN SKILLS, TECHNOLOGY & INFRASTRUCTURE Science-based standards for fish and fisheries products & implementation CODEX, eco-labelling, sustainability and traceability to combat IUU). ADVICE ON MARKET TRENDS & PRICING
  57. 57. EXPLOITING LINKS BETWEEN TOURISM & MARINE ENVIRONMENT Greater support to SIDS in promoting ecotourism and sustainable use of marine resources
  58. 58. TOURISM & THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT • Cooperatives established to manage manatee stocks in Belize. • Fiji combining tourist resort development with traditional coastal fishing villages. • Aquaculture sites and traditional cultures have been combined with various marine tourism activities such as snorkeling, diving, fishing, sailing and surfing. • Marine parks in the Caribbean support low impact tourism activities
  59. 59. MODEL OF LOMBOK ISLAND - INDONESIA Blue Growth implementation in Lombok Island, Indonesia has been suggested as model for the Blue Growth implementation in SIDS. Activities of tuna fisheries, shrimp culture, pearl oyster culture, seaweed culture, processing and marketing, salt ponds, rice-fish farming, mangrove forests, marine tourism
  60. 60. AGRI -TECH & SIDS? Technology has its place in aiding progress in Agriculture – much discussion on climate resistant varieties, use of blockchain & other digital techs to ensure quality – and more Tech played an impt role in Vanuatu’s ability to monitor illegal fishing
  61. 61. Many opportunities already exist which have not yet been fully exploited
  62. 62. SPECIFICALLY TARGET SMALL PRODUCERS • PROVIDE TECHNICAL AND FINANCIAL SUPPORT TO ACHIEVE COMMERCIALIZATION & INCLUSION IN TOURISM FOOD MARKETS • SUPPORT DEVELOPMENT OF FARMERS COOPERATIVES AND SMALL PRODUCER ORGANIZATIONS • CONSIDER CENTRALIZED MARKETING SUPPORT • SUPPORT SKILLS DEVELOPMENT & ENTREPEURNSHIP
  63. 63. STRENGTHEN DOMESTIC & REGIONAL MARKETS • STRENGTHEN LINKS BETWEEN DOMESTIC AGRICULTURE & TOURISM • BUILD & EXPLOIT REGIONAL VALUE CHAINS – CREATE SCALE • INVEST IN SYSTEMS OF MARINE TRANSPORTATION • INTRODUCE BEST PRACTICES & APPROPRIATE TECHNOLOGIES • CATALYSE BEHAVIORAL CHANGES FROM PRODUCTION TO CONSUMPTION • FOCUS ON DOMESTIC POLICIES –FOOD HYGIENE, SAFETY, LABELING
  64. 64. OPPORTUNITIES EXIST TO DO MORE WITH WHAT EXISTS • EDUCATE CONSUMERS – HEALTH BENEFITS TO EATING AND BUYING LOCAL • EDUCATE VISITORS – SUPPORTING LOCAL FARMS & EXPLORING DIFFERENT CULTURES • DEVELOP NICHE MARKETS SUCH AS YACHTING • LINK SMALL FARMERS TO VILLAGE TOURISM • DEVELOP POLICIES WHICH REWARD & VALUE AGRICULTURE
  65. 65. FINAL REFLECTIONS? Behind the myth of paradise – are real people, with real lives, needing jobs and looking to make ends meet.
  66. 66. FOR SIDS CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES WILL ALWAYS EXIST Sometimes In Scoping Far And Wide For Opportunities – We Fail To Exploit Those Which Are Already There IN THESE TIMES OF EVEN GREATER CHALLENGES - EVEN MORE ATTENTION NEEDS TO BE DEVOTED TO MANAGING – BETTER - THOSE ELEMENTS WITH THE POTENTIAL TO GENERATE SOLID RESULTS
  67. 67. THANK YOU!

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