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Meditation

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Meditation

  1. 1. Meditation: Seeing Things As They Really Are There are two types of meditation in Buddhism - one is samatha and the other is vipassanā meditation. Samatha meditation is to calm or tranquil the mind by means of concentration. Whereas, vipassanā meditation is to mould the mind into seeing all things as they really are – an insight into the true nature of reality. The main focus of vipassanā meditation is to attain pure awareness via mindfulness. Vipassanā is often preceded by samatha but nonetheless, both types are inter- dependable throughout the practices in order to achieve favourable results in meditation. Microscopic analysis of things If one were to zoom in the analysis of a solid ball by looking into the contents and then its basic matters i.e. atoms, one could realise that the ultimate result would yield to the absence of things (no things). At the end of the day, one could declare that form is empty in the real sense because there is no core essence within it except for the basic elements (energy, matter and space) that orientate and evolve constantly under the influence of the external conditions. In other words, one could mention that the form entity has a delusive nature i.e. it is an appearance, though not illusive, but devoid of inherent existence and constantly varies under the influence of conditional phenomena. Macroscopic analysis of things If one were to zoom out the analysis of a solid ball by receding into a long shot distance indefinitely, the solid ball would appear to be shrinking into a tiniest size and one could realise that the ultimate result would yield to the absence of things (no things). In other words, the broader the perspective that one engages in, the lesser the multiplicity of things would appear to be. For example, the viewing of the earth from far and near would yield a different result to the observer’s perception altogether.
  2. 2. Emptiness Macroscopic analysis (Zoom out) (Vipassanā meditation) Macro perspective (Uniformity & infinite) Micro perspective (Multiplicity & definite) Microscopic analysis (Zoom in) (Samatha meditation) Emptiness As a conclusion, the emptiness of phenomena is both the cause and consequence of the dependent nature of phenomena. It is the inherent quality of existence and is considered the ultimate truth because it inherently exists exactly as it is perceived when it is perceived directly by an enlightened mind. And discovering the ultimate truth is the key to overcoming the ignorant state of mind. Transcending the mind via meditation would allow the dilution of one’s personal ego under the light of pure awareness and subsequently, it would give rise to the original source connection – the emptiness of all things. More importantly, one should not confuse emptiness with nothingness. Emptiness cannot be meant as nothingness but instead, it is more associated with no-thing- ness. No thing can mean no becoming or no changing. No changing means no suffering. No suffering means no mind. Mind is the forerunner of all states. No mind means a completely neutralised state of affairs - that is nibbāna. The state of nibbāna is inexplicable in conventional terms but still, it can be tasted by the enlightened ones during deep meditation. MIND Jhāna & upekkhā

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