Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.
EUNIC Siena Cultural Relations Forum
2nd edition, June 26-29, 2019
Rectorate, University of Siena, Siena, Italy
“Bridging ...
First challenge - nationalist tendencies and aggravated image of the EU. In times, when the
European identity is being que...
networks serve as spaces to inspire, to test new ideas and to pilot new projects, to help the
culture sector to take risks...
their respective sectors and especially - those parts of it which are eager to work
internationally, thus networks can pro...
works. Showcasing artworks in other European countries and beyond promotes the
arts’ diversity and their social relevance ...
Prochain SlideShare
Chargement dans…5
×

Elena Polivtseva - Communication and Policy Manager IETM, International network for contemporary performing arts

The role of the artistic field and international networks in the EU international cultural relations

Livres associés

Gratuit avec un essai de 30 jours de Scribd

Tout voir
  • Soyez le premier à commenter

  • Soyez le premier à aimer ceci

Elena Polivtseva - Communication and Policy Manager IETM, International network for contemporary performing arts

  1. 1. EUNIC Siena Cultural Relations Forum 2nd edition, June 26-29, 2019 Rectorate, University of Siena, Siena, Italy “Bridging Theory and Practice. A European Strategic Approach to International Cultural Relations: The state of the art” The role of the artistic field and international networks in the EU international cultural relations Speaker: Elena Polivtseva, Communication and Policy Manager IETM, International network for contemporary performing arts IETM’s mission is to advocate the value of the arts and culture in a changing world and empower performing arts professionals through access to international connections, knowledge and a dynamic forum for exchange. We hold two plenary meetings a year in different European cities, and smaller meetings all over the world, where our members meet their peers and potential collaborators from other countries, learn about other realities, share experiences and know-how on how to cope with similar challenges. IETM was created in 1981, when internationalisation was a challenge, especially for the independent scene. Our members include festivals, companies, producers, theatres, research and resource centers, universities and institutional bodies. They are part of our network mainly because they value the international aspect of their work and want to sustain and enhance it. In my intervention, I would like to comment on the inclusion of the artistic field and cultural networks in the implementation of the EU strategic approach to international cultural relations. Civil society, grassroots and local cultural organisations figure prominently in the EU official discourse on international cultural relations, and there is a distinct commitment to pursue a people-to-people, bottom-up approach. However, it remains questionable whether the process of implementing the EU strategic approach has been fully inclusive and participatory up to this point, and whether the grassroot organisations, networks and artistic field have had real opportunities to play one of the leading and significant roles in the process. I am going to highlight the arguments why the field and the networks deserve a much better integration in the EU international cultural relations strategy. Further on, I will lay down briefly what should be the main principles and steps of their integration. To start with, I would like to highlight that IETM, as one of the oldest and largest international cultural networks, has always been very supportive of the EU endeavor to include culture in its international cultural relations, and we believe the joint communication “Towards an EU strategy for international cultural relations” (2016) and its subsequent implementation came in a very right moment. Nevertheless, it is essential to consider seriously that the reality Europeans live in today is changing very rapidly, and a more careful, realistic and inclusive approach should be developed to make sure the different challenges the Union is living through, don’t hinder the development of a truly revolutionary and forward-looking EU strategy on international relations.
  2. 2. First challenge - nationalist tendencies and aggravated image of the EU. In times, when the European identity is being questioned and shaken by nationalistic and Eurosceptic tendencies (and not only tendencies, but real happenings, such as Brexit), it is crucial to overcome a dangerous crisis of confidence which may overwhelm the EU, if not yet. In this reality, the ambition of becoming a global superpower may be a little less realistic than quite some time ago. What is more urgent and relevant today is shaping and strengthening Europeans’ understanding of their own common core values. Moreover, the EU should aim at nourishing cultural understandings and helping create a climate of international trust by focusing on equal, two-way people-to-people connections and long-term relationships. This can enhance the EU’s credibility as a global actor. Recalling the main role the EU plays in the cultural domain according to the treaty, (supporting, coordinating or supplementing the actions of member-states), the EU can bring an added-value in the field of international cultural relations by reinforcing intercultural dialogue, counteracting the negative images certain member states may have in the world (inter alia due to their colonial past), and creating a badly missing space where cultural differences are respected and celebrated, where different identities can co-exist and interact in a productive dialogue, without picturing the EU identity as a superior one. Second challenge - the rapidly changing European societies, due to migration and digitization. In my view, the EU should be careful promoting its values and identity not only to the outside world, but also within its own borders. First of all, the concept of European identity has been on our tongues for a few decades now, while societies changed dramatically, new communities were formed, and citizens are ever more connected globally. It is no longer clear what the concept means today, whether it reflects the complexity and multiplicity of European societies. In this reality, it is great if the EU creates awareness about its guiding values, but when it comes to the outside world, we should avoid being too arrogant or self-centered. Instead, we should be prepared to listen and learn from others as well. Again, we need to build intangible, human-based bridges between different cultures, histories, mentalities, which are initiated on a basis of an equal and fair dialogue, and not with an aim of imposing the European values and identity. Third challenge - the environmental sustainability. In times of environmental degradation, it has become ever more urgent to rethink the existing models of international relations, not only in terms of travelling - which is most often being discussed, but rather in terms of sustainability in all senses - economic, social, etc. Instead of one-shot initiatives, we need to construct meaningful and truly impactful cross-border connections, which are part of a forward-looking strategy meant to contribute to international relations, but also to the development of local communities and long-term interpersonal bonds, which will not fall apart once the political climate changes and will continue to nourish understanding and partnerships. This all is extremely urgent when the environmental crisis dictates us to be as meaningful as possible once it comes to any cross-border initiative. So, if we seriously consider those three challenges, it becomes apparent that the grassroots level and artistic networks should be given a central role in implementing the EU international cultural relations strategic approach. First of all, the most innovative, resilient and creative solutions to overcome the abovementioned challenges will not come only from governments and state-related agents. Reinventing democracy, and an honest and far- reaching reflection on identity require courage, creativity, the element of unexpected, sometimes subversive action. Only a deeply touched or shaken emotion can revive hope and bring people together in a collective endeavor to build a common future. In this sense, artists and cultural professionals are to play a huge role. And the cultural and artistic
  3. 3. networks serve as spaces to inspire, to test new ideas and to pilot new projects, to help the culture sector to take risks and meet new challenges. Secondly, a proper integration of the arts field and networks in the EU strategy of international relations would make the strategy more effective, sustainable and credible. In a context where equal people-to-people relations - independent from the governmental directives - prevail, the EU has higher chances to succeed. Here again, artists and their networks have an enormous potential to contribute. Arts are the best tools to reveal the complexity and multiplicity of identities and values, existing across Europe, and help people embrace them and accept this diversity. This opens minds and nourishes respect towards the "other", not only regarding other countries, but also in relation to the various communities co-existing within the same cities, settlements and neighbourhoods. What we need is not only the awareness about the differences that surround us, but also an ability to compromise, rethink and challenge some parts of our own identities. Developing such a space, sort of a grey zone, is a potential outcomes of cross-border collaborations led by the artistic field, including the networks which have a long experience in designing inclusive spaces, based on real curiosity and a thirst for equal and free conversation. Thirdly, if we are concerned about the sustainability of our planet and our global community, we should admit that the strongest ties and far- reaching and long-term relationships are built on the most intrinsic level - interpersonal, which should be free from rapidly changing discourses of dominant political elites and outdated national border paradigms. Culture and the arts have long time stopped to be dependent on the border concept. When interpersonal bonds across national frontiers are established, they are hard to break, even if political structures are falling apart; for example, Brexit does not seem to hinder the cross-border interpersonal connections within the art community (example of IETM), despite the toxic political discourse and the institutional changes to come. Nourishing people-to-people connections is already one of the guiding principles of developing EU’s international cultural dimension, according to the papers, thus grass-root actors, artistic organisations and their networks should be given a major role to play. I would like to emphasize that particularly small and micro-organisations and grass- root initiatives answer most efficiently to the many different needs of our fragmented societies. Being particularly flexible, agile and prone for international mobility, they are at the forefront of conceiving and fostering cross-border bonds and collaborations, which are essential for nourishing a feeling of common European culture and values. A few words about the role of networks (based on the statement “The Value of International Cultural Networks”). We cultural networks, are proud to promote and facilitate all forms of international collaboration and improve the access to arts and culture. As networks we build trust and nurture relationships across national borders that support people to overcome local as well as global difficulties and to exchange their ideas, knowledge and expertise. Our ‘raison d’être’ is to inspire, to be inclusive, to test new ideas and to pilot new projects, to help the culture sector to take risks and meet new challenges. Our strength is our members, thousands of organisations and individuals, working together, engaging with communities, learning from each other, sharing experiences and resources. Our role is to connect, bridge realities, coordinate joint efforts: we advise, we host, we mediate, inside our respective fields and beyond. Networks share values and ethics: we empower arts organisations to develop and let creative workers grow, we introduce an international dimension and support grassroots players facing difficult political and economic times that threaten to marginalise them. Networks are significant providers of capacity building - both within the EU borders and globally. IETM alone, over the past few decades has enhanced its capacity building element - trainings, summer school, toolkits, mentorship programmes, etc. - and it is growing every year. Networks are also very knowledgeable of the specifics of
  4. 4. their respective sectors and especially - those parts of it which are eager to work internationally, thus networks can provide very valuable and unique policy advice. Traditionally, they also play the bridging role between the EU policy-making scene and the field - both in Europe and local partners in third countries. Practical recommendations on how to include the artistic field and networks in the process of implementing the EU’s strategic approach to international cultural relations. 1. Multilateral fora, including a variety of cultural players - and not only institutional actors - must be established and convened on a regular basis. IETM is a network which is unique of the diversity of its members - from small companies and freelance professionals to big organisations and national cultural institutes. Gathering this diversity of players around the table and giving them equal voice is one of the great strengths of our meetings which often reveal the most unexpected angles of topics discussed and help find the most robust and innovative solutions. 2. Beyond educating the outside world about the European culture, it should be a priority to help the European cultural sector to understand the political, historical, social and socio-cultural realities in which their international colleagues work. Empower the networks to share the expertise they have been already generating and collecting and support them in going deeper in it. Examples: IETM’s mappings (commissioned to local researchers), articles, publications featuring projects from all over the world, Caravans (exploratory trips), Satellites often focused on a region / city / country. When generating knowledge, listen to the variety of local partners, give them as much voice as possible, provide them with leading roles in organizing joint projects. 3. In the Joint Communication, it is stated that the strategic approach will be implemented “within the existing funding instruments”. It is necessary to analyse each existing instrument regarding its relevance and accessibility to the non-EU partners. For example, Creative Europe is a wonderful programme, which is, unfortunately, hard to access for many actors, which have low capacity to co-finance projects and even handle a very demanding application process. As a result, many EU countries are underrepresented in the programme, let alone the non-EU applicants. It is wished that the Creative Europe programme should consider the extreme diversity of the contexts and situations the potential applicants are locked in and thus be more flexible and less administratively burdensome. For instance, higher co-financing rates should be introduced in the future CE programme 2021- 2027. We welcome the intention to open a special call for CE cooperation projects involving partners from Western Balkans, with lower co-financing requested. At the same time, we would like to emphasise the necessity to monitor the quality of such partnerships (also in relation to any future calls aimed at inclusion of partners from special geographic areas) very carefully. Applicants should not be encouraged to tick boxes by including specific type of partners in their projects, without a meaningful ground behind their collaboration. 4. Enhanced support for mobility for artists and cultural operators should be regarded as a driving element of the EU international cultural relations. The joint communication explicitly mentions only the mobility of researchers, students and alumni, but we are happy that the Council conclusions highlight the mobility of artists and cultural professionals as well. We would like to stress that beyond individuals, it is incredibly valuable to support the mobility of collectives and circulation of artistic
  5. 5. works. Showcasing artworks in other European countries and beyond promotes the arts’ diversity and their social relevance and celebrating the togetherness of European citizens beyond national borders, social and cultural differences, and language barriers. When developing any scheme for mobility between the EU and non-EU countries, it must be taken into account that the visa regimes between some states pose real obstacles for artists and culture professionals to travel - despite the long-lasting advocacy efforts of the international cultural sector. This should be urgently addressed within the respective DG’s. 5. The environmental concern and sustainability in a larger sense should be given a central place within the EU strategic approach to international cultural relations. More long-term relationships (a series of actions which are undertaken as part of a long-term project, building connections with local partners and audiences, involving communities, etc.) should be favoured over the one-time initiatives, when it comes to project and mobility funding. Moreover, the application process must inspire reflection of each applicant on how environmentally and socially sustainable their envisaged action will be. Many cultural networks are reflecting on how their respective communities of artists and cultural operators can design and pursue more sustainable strategies. More support for networks at the EU level is needed to make it a large-scale and successful endeavor. 6. We would also like to support the point made in the opinion of the EESC that “(inter)cultural exchanges must not be limited to artists and cultural stakeholders but should include a strong dimension of outreach to and participation of all citizens.”

    Soyez le premier à commenter

The role of the artistic field and international networks in the EU international cultural relations

Vues

Nombre de vues

232

Sur Slideshare

0

À partir des intégrations

0

Nombre d'intégrations

173

Actions

Téléchargements

1

Partages

0

Commentaires

0

Mentions J'aime

0

×