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English
Romanticism
   1770-1850
What is Romanticism?
   Imagination
   Intuition
   Idealism
   Inspiration
   Individuality
Imagination

   Imagination emphasized over reason
   Backlash against Neoclassical Age of Reason
   Imagination necess...
Intuition

   Intuition, or feelings and instincts, emphasized
    over reason
   Emotions important in Romantic art
  ...
Idealism

   World can be made a better place
   Emphasis of spirit, language, and mind over matter
   Immanuel Kant: t...
Inspiration

   Artists, musicians, writers are “inspired creators”
    rather than “technical masters”
   Spontaneity f...
Mozart
Tchaikovsky
Individuality

   Importance of the individual, unique, even
    eccentric
   Bold, Romantic hero
   Rejection of absol...
Timeline

   1798-1832: from publication of Lyrical Ballads to
    death of Sir Walter Scott
   Problematic: Robert Burn...
Lyrical Ballads
   1792, William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor
    Coleridge
   Considered beginning of English literary
...
Preface

The majority of the following poems are to be considered as
experiments. They were written chiefly with a view to ...
Early Romantics

   Robert Burns
   William Blake
   William Wordsworth
   Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Robert Burns
   1759-1796

   Scottish poet, Scots dialect

   Well known poems:

        “To a Louse”

        “To a...
William Blake

   1757-1827

   Poet, painter, printmaker

   Songs of Innocence and
    Experience
William Wordsworth

   1770-1850

   England’s Poet Laureate,
    1843-1850

   Lyrical Ballads
Samuel Taylor Coleridge

   1772-1834

   Co-writer, Lyrical Ballads

   The Rime of the Ancient
    Mariner and “Kubla...
Later Romantics
   George Gordon, Lord Byron
   Percy Bysshe Shelley
   John Keats
   Mary Shelley
   Jane Austen
Lord Byron

   1788-1824

   “Byronic hero”

   Don Juan and Childe
    Harold’s Pilgrimage; “She
    Walks in Beauty,”...
Percy Bysshe Shelley

   1792-1822

   “Ozymandias,” “Ode to the
    West Wind,” “To a
    Skylark”
John Keats

   1795-1821

   “La Belle Dame Sans
    Merci,” “Ode on a Grecian
    Urn”
Trivia
The Romantics Death Triangle

1770           Wordsworth         1850
 1772           Coleridge      1834
    1788  ...
Mary Shelley

   1797-1851

   Wife of Percy Bysshe
    Shelley, daughter of
    William Godwin and Mary
    Wollstonecr...
Jane Austen

   1775-1817

   Pride and Prejudice, Sense and
    Sensibility, Emma, Mansfield
    Park, Persuasion, North...
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Romanticism

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Introduction to English Romantic literature.

Publié dans : Formation

Romanticism

  1. 1. English Romanticism 1770-1850
  2. 2. What is Romanticism?  Imagination  Intuition  Idealism  Inspiration  Individuality
  3. 3. Imagination  Imagination emphasized over reason  Backlash against Neoclassical Age of Reason  Imagination necessary for creation of all art  Samuel Taylor Coleridge: “intellectual intuition”
  4. 4. Intuition  Intuition, or feelings and instincts, emphasized over reason  Emotions important in Romantic art  William Wordsworth: Poetry is “the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings”
  5. 5. Idealism  World can be made a better place  Emphasis of spirit, language, and mind over matter  Immanuel Kant: the mind forces the world we perceive to take the shape of space and time
  6. 6. Inspiration  Artists, musicians, writers are “inspired creators” rather than “technical masters”  Spontaneity favored over precision
  7. 7. Mozart
  8. 8. Tchaikovsky
  9. 9. Individuality  Importance of the individual, unique, even eccentric  Bold, Romantic hero  Rejection of absolute systems (religion, philosophy)
  10. 10. Timeline  1798-1832: from publication of Lyrical Ballads to death of Sir Walter Scott  Problematic: Robert Burns and William Blake?  “Age of Revolutions”: American (1776) and French (1789) Revolutions predate 1798
  11. 11. Lyrical Ballads  1792, William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge  Considered beginning of English literary Romanticism  Experimental poetry  Vernacular language  Simple, uneducated people as subjects
  12. 12. Preface The majority of the following poems are to be considered as experiments. They were written chiefly with a view to ascertain how far the language of conversation in the middle and lower classes of society is adapted to the purpose of poetic pleasure.
  13. 13. Early Romantics  Robert Burns  William Blake  William Wordsworth  Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  14. 14. Robert Burns  1759-1796  Scottish poet, Scots dialect  Well known poems:  “To a Louse”  “To a Mouse”  “Auld Lang Syne”  “Comin’ Thro’ the Rye”
  15. 15. William Blake  1757-1827  Poet, painter, printmaker  Songs of Innocence and Experience
  16. 16. William Wordsworth  1770-1850  England’s Poet Laureate, 1843-1850  Lyrical Ballads
  17. 17. Samuel Taylor Coleridge  1772-1834  Co-writer, Lyrical Ballads  The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and “Kubla Khan”
  18. 18. Later Romantics  George Gordon, Lord Byron  Percy Bysshe Shelley  John Keats  Mary Shelley  Jane Austen
  19. 19. Lord Byron  1788-1824  “Byronic hero”  Don Juan and Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage; “She Walks in Beauty,” “We’ll Go No More a Roving”
  20. 20. Percy Bysshe Shelley  1792-1822  “Ozymandias,” “Ode to the West Wind,” “To a Skylark”
  21. 21. John Keats  1795-1821  “La Belle Dame Sans Merci,” “Ode on a Grecian Urn”
  22. 22. Trivia The Romantics Death Triangle 1770 Wordsworth 1850 1772 Coleridge 1834 1788 Byron 1824 1792 Shelley 1822 1795 Keats 1821
  23. 23. Mary Shelley  1797-1851  Wife of Percy Bysshe Shelley, daughter of William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft  Frankenstein
  24. 24. Jane Austen  1775-1817  Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, Emma, Mansfield Park, Persuasion, Northanger Abbey

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