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The Social Side of Mobile Health

Short talk given to the UBC School of Population and Public Health course on social media in health and medicine (SPPH 581H).

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The Social Side of Mobile Health

  1. 2. <ul><li>The social side of mobile health </li></ul><ul><li>Exploring the nature of mobile consumption, creation and connection for health </li></ul><ul><li>Daniel Hooker, MLIS </li></ul><ul><li>eHealth Strategy Office </li></ul><ul><li>@danhooker </li></ul>
  2. 3. <ul><li>Information is mobile </li></ul><ul><li>Health information on mobile devices is </li></ul><ul><li>consumed </li></ul><ul><li>created </li></ul><ul><li>contextual </li></ul><ul><li>connected </li></ul>
  3. 4. <ul><li>Health information is consumed on mobiles </li></ul>
  4. 5. <ul><li>Consumer-targeted </li></ul>
  5. 6. <ul><li>Professional-targeted </li></ul>
  6. 7. <ul><li>Health information is created on mobiles </li></ul>
  7. 8. <ul><li>Tracking health through behaviour </li></ul>
  8. 9. <ul><li>Tracking health through keywords </li></ul>
  9. 10. <ul><li>Tracking health through sentiment </li></ul>
  10. 11. <ul><li>Tracking health through location </li></ul>
  11. 15. <ul><li>Seemingly unrelated information has a way of becoming useful, too </li></ul>
  12. 16. <ul><li>Foursquare </li></ul>Image courtesy eelx on Flickr.
  13. 17. <ul><li>Foursquare, meet hospitals </li></ul>
  14. 18. <ul><li>Foursquare, meet healthy behaviour </li></ul>
  15. 19. <ul><li>But the true transformative power of mobile is in the users and their communities </li></ul>
  16. 20. <ul><li>Communities for behaviour change </li></ul><ul><li>Centola (2010): What kind of network structures spread health behaviours better? </li></ul>Science 2010;329(5996) doi: 10.1126/science.1185231
  17. 21. <ul><li>Communities for behaviour change </li></ul><ul><li>Centola (2010): What kind of network structures spread health behaviours better? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>” long-tie” networks that spread behaviours quickly but lack redundant exposures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>OR </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Clustered networks that don’t spread behaviour far, but have layers of exposure </li></ul></ul>Science 2010;329(5996) doi: 10.1126/science.1185231
  18. 22. Science 2010;329(5996) doi: 10.1126/science.1185231
  19. 23. <ul><li>Communities for behaviour change </li></ul><ul><li>Centola (2010): What kind of network structures spread health behaviours better? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>” long-tie” networks that spread behaviours quickly but lack redundant exposures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>OR </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Clustered networks that don’t spread behaviour far, but have layers of exposure </li></ul></ul>Science 2010;329(5996) doi: 10.1126/science.1185231
  20. 24. <ul><li>Mobile communities for behaviour change </li></ul><ul><li>Mobile devices have the potential to be effective in supporting these networks due to two unique, converging factors: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The “always-on” nature </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The relationship we create with the device itself </li></ul></ul>
  21. 25. <ul><li>The “always-on” nature </li></ul>
  22. 26. <ul><li>The relationship of user/device </li></ul>
  23. 27. <ul><li>User/device relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Belk (1988) looked at how we “extend” ourselves through our possessions, and may in fact associate portions of our self-concept through this extended self more so than an unextended self. </li></ul>Journal of Consumer Research 15(2), 139-168 http :// www.jstor.org /stable/2489522
  24. 28. <ul><li>User/device relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Belk (1988) looked at how we “extend” ourselves through our possessions, and may in fact associate portions of our self-concept through this extended self more so than an unextended self. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>photo albums </li></ul></ul>Journal of Consumer Research 15(2), 139-168 http :// www.jstor.org /stable/2489522
  25. 29. <ul><li>User/device relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Belk (1988) looked at how we “extend” ourselves through our possessions, and may in fact associate portions of our self-concept through this extended self more so than an unextended self. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>photo albums </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>cars </li></ul></ul>Journal of Consumer Research 15(2), 139-168 http :// www.jstor.org /stable/2489522
  26. 30. <ul><li>User/device relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Belk (1988) looked at how we “extend” ourselves through our possessions, and may in fact associate portions of our self-concept through this extended self more so than an unextended self. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>photo albums </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>cars </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[cell phones] </li></ul></ul>Journal of Consumer Research 15(2), 139-168 http :// www.jstor.org /stable/2489522
  27. 31. <ul><li>User/device relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Blom and Monk (2003) examined cell phone users’ motivations for personalizing their devices. </li></ul>Behaviour & Information Technology, 26:3, 237-24 doi: 10.1080/01449290500348168
  28. 32. <ul><li>User/device relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Blom and Monk (2003) examined cell phone users’ motivations for personalizing their devices. </li></ul><ul><li>“ There are significant positive correlations between the extent of personalization and… enduring emotional effects.” </li></ul>Behaviour & Information Technology, 26:3, 237-24 doi: 10.1080/01449290500348168
  29. 33. <ul><li>User/device relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Jarvenpaa and Lang (2005) outline the paradoxes of mobile usage </li></ul>Information Systems Management 22(4) 7-23 doi: 10.1201/1078.10580530/45520.22.4.20050901/90026.2
  30. 34. <ul><li>User/device relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Jarvenpaa and Lang (2005) outline the paradoxes of mobile usage </li></ul><ul><li>Does your device empower you? </li></ul><ul><li>Or enslave you? </li></ul><ul><li>Or both? </li></ul>Information Systems Management 22(4) 7-23 doi: 10.1201/1078.10580530/45520.22.4.20050901/90026.2
  31. 35. <ul><li>User/device relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Sherry Turkle at MIT has been a long-time thinker and scholar in this area, and wrote a paper that describes these events as a new form of technology that is “always on, always on you.” </li></ul>“ Always-on/Always-on-you: The Tethered Self . ” In Handbook of Mobile Communication Studies, James E. Katz (ed.). MIT Press, 2008.
  32. 36. <ul><li>User/device relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Sherry Turkle at MIT has been a long-time thinker and scholar in this area, and wrote a paper that describes these events as a new form of technology that is “always on, always on you.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ We occupy a liminal space between physical life and our life on the screen. We participate in both at the same time.” </li></ul>“ Always-on/Always-on-you: The Tethered Self . ” In Handbook of Mobile Communication Studies, James E. Katz (ed.). MIT Press, 2008.
  33. 37. <ul><li>This connection between user and device is becoming stronger all the time </li></ul>
  34. 42. Science 2010;329(5996) doi: 10.1126/science.1185231
  35. 43. Science 2010;329(5996) doi: 10.1126/science.1185231

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