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Digital Marketing Best Practices Guide

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Download the PDF: https://www.demandmetric.com/content/digital-marketing-best-practices-report

It has been said that “All Marketing is Digital Marketing.” And with good reason! In the last decade (or less), the marketing environment has been transformed.

Marketing has moved from an environment in which traditional marketing, brick and mortar storefronts and Digital Marketing options all competed for the time, attention and resources of the marketing department to one in which Digital Marketing reigns supreme – with an occasional nod in the direction of the storefront, or traditional marketing (direct mail, print advertising, etc.)

One of the biggest challenges of Digital Marketing is the speed of which it has taken over the marketing organization, often in an ad hoc, uncoordinated fashion.

Demand Metric’s research has consistently shown that Digital Marketing has a very significant and positive impact on the organizations that are employing it when they do so by following best practices and processes in a coordinated, holistic approach.

In this Best Practices Report on Digital Marketing we will cover the Digital Marketing landscape in five distinct categories - Content Marketing, Social Media Marketing, Mobile Marketing, Video Marketing and Public Relations

Publié dans : Marketing

Digital Marketing Best Practices Guide

  1. 1. DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE Best Practices, Insights, & Vendor Analysis
  2. 2. Table of Contents 1 3 2 6 3 11 Executive Summary What is Digital Marketing? Digital Marketing & The MMO Digital Marketing Landscape Digital Marketing Roles Matrix Digital Marketing Maturity Model Analyst Bottom Line DIGITAL MARKETING Best Practices Guide 184 6 35 377 408 41Action Plan 51About Demand Metric
  3. 3. 3DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDEEXECUTIVE SUMMARY It has been said that “All Marketing is Digital Marketing,” and with good reason! In the last decade (or less), the marketing environment has been transformed. Marketing has moved from an environment in which traditional marketing, brick and mortar storefronts, and Digital Marketing options all competed for thetime,attention,andresourcesofthemarketingdepartmenttooneinwhich Digital Marketing reigns supreme – with an occasional nod in the direction of the storefront, or traditional marketing (direct mail, print advertising, etc.). One of the biggest challenges of Digital Marketing is the speed at which it has taken over the marketing organization, often in an ad hoc, uncoordi- nated fashion. Demand Metric’s research has consistently shown that Digital Marketing has a very significant and positive impact on the organizations that are employing it when they do so by following best practices and processes in a coordi- nated, holistic approach. In this Best Practices Report on Digital Marketing we will cover the Digital Marketing landscape in six distinct categories. Executive Summary This report covers: Social Media Marketing Mobile Marketing Video Marketing Content Marketing Action Plan Public Relations
  4. 4. 4DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDEEXECUTIVE SUMMARY We present four models to enable Modern Marketers to take a holistic approach to Digital Marketing. These four models are: The Modern Marketing Department Structure, which offers a look at the key functions needed to fully address Digital Marketing initiatives across the organization. The Marketing Organization Maturity Model, which shows the progression and pathway a marketing depart- ment should take to mature from a Cost Center to a World Class Organization, responsible for, and measured on, driving sales and revenue. The Digital Marketing Maturity Model, which shows the pathway an organization should take to mature in its use of Digital Marketing from Ad Hoc to World Class. The Digital Marketing Roles Matrix, which highlights the roles, responsibilities, processes, technology, content, and metrics for effective Digital Marketing strategies. Orientation STAGE 1 - Undefined STAGE 2 - Progressive STAGE 3 - Mature STAGE 4 - World-Class Tools & Platforms No defined strategy or process for Digital Marketing or digital properties Ad hoc development; Point tools for Email, Content and Social Media Marketing; No mobile or video apps Platforms that perform specific func- tions with coordinated tools, applica- tions and workflows Platforms connected to each other i.e. Web Content Management to Content Marketing to Social Listening API integration to Enterprise CRM and MA systems Utilizes comprehensive, end-to-end system integration of all Digital Marketing related platforms with tight integration to Enterprise CRM, MA and other legacy ERP systems Defined strategy and processes exist for Digital Marketing in pockets in the organization Defined, integrated strategy and processes exist for Digital Marketing across an Enterprise Defined, integrated strategy for Digital Marketing exists across an Enterprise; Campaigns are tracked and measured by effectiveness of engagement and conversion Leadership Does not see difference between Digital and Traditional Marketing Views digital as new marketing channel; Allocates budget & staff resources Recognizes that Digital Marketing is omni- channel and the key component in audi- ence engagement to drive preference & loyalty; Long term commitment; Willing participant; Resources for growth Views Digital Marketing as key component in customer engage- ment strategy and primary focus for marketing team; Organization aligned and measured around Digital Marketing’s contribution to revenue Digital Marketing DIGITAL MARKETING Maturity Model LEVEL 1 - Cost Center LEVEL 2 - Revenue Neutral LEVEL 3 - Revenue Contributor LEVEL 4 - Profit Center World Class Marketing Organization Leadership Staffing Budget Orientation Marketing plan aligned with and drives business planning CMO, VPs, Directors, Managers and Program Managers CMO compensation tied to revenue & marketing performance Budgeting is connected to revenue growth targets Very reactive, operational, not strategic, no plan No senior leadership in Marketing, possibly a Manager Informal roles & responsibilities, no job description No budget exists, spending is Ad Hoc Still reactive, some campaign plan- ning, no strategic plan Director of Marketing, with Project or Program Managers Basic job descriptions in place but rarely updated A small budget exists for items such as trade shows, etc. Working from a strategic marketing plan and campaign plans VP, Director of Marketing, Program Managers Job descriptions & performance reviews done regularly A budget exists and business cases are created to justify spend WORLD CLASS MARKETING ORGANIZATION Maturity Model V I E W R E S O U R C E V I E W R E S O U R C E V I E W R E S O U R C E V I E W R E S O U R C E
  5. 5. 5DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE Our goal is to enable the Modern Marketing Organization (MMO) to create a holistic, end-to-end, enterprise-level approach to Digital Marketing. Here are some of the highlights: The depth and breadth of Digital Marketing has created a compelling need within the MMO to gain control of it. Digital Marketing has evolved in four stages, externally and internally. Externally, we have seen the customer experience mature from mass display and broadcast to highly personalized real-time experiences. Internally, we have seen technologies mature from ad hoc point solu- tions to fully integrated, end-to-end systems connected across the Enterprise, at every touchpoint and delivery channel. Our Solutions section covers the Digital Marketing systems, vendors, and applications from the five Digital Marketing functions: Content Marketing, Social Media Marketing, Mobile Marketing, Video Marketing, and Public Relations. Each of these categories is covered in more detail in our Digital Marketing Solution Study Series. Additionally, Digital Marketing teams need to evaluate and integrate their approach to websites, landing pages and microsites, online advertising and SEO, creative design services, and virtual events. These will be covered in detail in our Customer Experience Virtual Summit. Demand Metric’s key recommendation from this report is that Digital Marketing can make a significant and positive impact on organizations that are employing it, when they do so by following best practices and processes holistically integrated across the five key categories listed above. We offer this Best Practices Report to enable your organization to make your Digital Marketing function the best that it can be. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
  6. 6. 6DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDEWHAT IS DIGITAL MARKETING? Digital Marketing is, at its most basic, the use of electronic means to present a company, product, and services to customers, prospective buyers, and the marketplace. The term Digital Marketing is so broad that it has almost lost all contextual meaning. The purpose of this report is to put a solid framework around Digital Marketing so that Modern Marketing Organizations can measure their progress and success in achieving their Digital Marketing goals. Broadly, Digital Marketing includes the creation and distribution of marketing through software, the Internet, and Social Media. It also covers the produc- tion of documents by electronic means such as digital printing. Since virtu- ally all documents today are designed in software such as Adobe Photoshop or InDesign and printed on digital printers, it is easy to see why we say all marketing is Digital Marketing. What is Digital Marketing? Demand Metric defines Digital Marketing as: The strategies, processes, tools, and technologies that support the development, deployment, management, and measurement of digital elements used for marketing and advertising. Bottom-line Digital Marketing drives revenue by creating a unique and memorable digital experience for the customer or prospect.
  7. 7. 7DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE Marketing’s focus on Digital Marketing continues to grow as more orga- nizations learn how to use digital resources for website traffic, demand generation, content marketing, online advertising, and mobile/video marketing development. The most sophisticated marketers realize that the value of Digital Marketing is not just for lead generation and nurturing, advertising, and content marketing. The true power rests in creating digital experiences that can drive brand equity, create lasting relationships, and directly impact sales, revenues, and profits. Demand Metric’s Digital Marketing Landscape Benchmark Report exam- inedthemajorfactorsdrivingDigitalExperiencesincludingbudgets,creation priorities, platforms, sophistication of digital experiences, approaches, and measurements. Driving Forces None 16 to 30% 46 to 60% 61 to 85% More than 85% 31 to 45% Don’t know 1 to 15% 4% 18% 8% 10% 14% 12% 6% 28% FIGURE 1: PERCENTAGE OF MARKETING BUDGET ALLOCATED TO DIGITAL WHAT IS DIGITAL MARKETING? DIGITAL MARKETING LANDSCAPE Benchmark Report V I E W R E S O U R C E
  8. 8. 8DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE 58% of study participants are allocating less than half of their budgets to digital marketing, which leaves room for growth. Yet, marketers have long understood that the digital marketing dollar goes farther than the traditional marketing dollar, so the budget for digital initiatives don’t directly indicate their impact (Figure 1). 59% of study participants rated the creation of digital experiences either “high” or “very high” as a marketing priority (Figure 2). A relationship exists between placing a high priority on digital expe- rience marketing and revenue growth. 76% of study participants that reported revenue growth in the most recent fiscal year also put a high priority on digital experience creation. For organizations that reported declining revenue growth, only 6% reported that digital experience creation was a high priority. The more sophisticated or advanced the digital experience, the more magnified the effect is on brand perception: 91% of study participants that are deploying sophisticated digital experiences report that these efforts have a favorable influence on brand perception. At the basic level of sophistication, only 50% of participants report this favorable impact. For organizations in which sophistication is advanced in the creation of digital experiences, 83% are also experiencing revenue growth. Just 6% and 11% of organizations, respectively, that are also deploying advanced or more sophisticated digital experiences are in flat or declining revenue growth situations. Here are some conclusions from the report: FIGURE 2: DIGITAL EXPERIENCE CREATION PRIORITY Very low High Moderate Low Very high 3% 35% 30% 8% 24% WHAT IS DIGITAL MARKETING?
  9. 9. 9DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE The benefits of effective Digital Marketing span across the MMO, touching several roles and departments, including Senior Management, Strategic Communications, Demand Generation, Content Marketing, Community, Social Media, Public Relations, Product Marketing, and Customer Experience. Creates the best digital experience to drive engagement. Creates an ongoing, real-time relationship with customers and prospects. Drives brand perception across all channels and touch points. Provides targeted, personalized, localized content at the right audi- ence at the right time. Increases conversion rates across all media channels. Provides a consistent customer experience by providing content for a specific buyer persona at a targeted stage in the buyer’s journey. Increases website and blog traffic and SEO. Collects more relevant and accurate customer data across multiple touch points. 1 2 3 Provides a native mobile customer experience, not one re-designed from web. Gets an integrated view of the customer’s total experience that is not fragmented by the device and software they are using. Stays connected to the customer as they move from PC to phone to tablet and back. Provides better customer service by handling problems and complaints quickly and personally using social listening. Gains product knowledge for future products and services by learning what customers are asking for on social networks. Learns who has the influence and clout in various social communi- ties and develops deeper relationships with them. Uses video to provide collateral for social marketing, enhance content initiatives, and produce more realistic customer experiences. 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Benefits of Digital Marketing WHAT IS DIGITAL MARKETING? Here are some of the top benefits we have observed in a comprehensive look at Digital Marketing. More benefits, directly related to each category, are found in the respective solution studies.
  10. 10. 10DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE Despite the benefits being achieved by those doing Digital Marketing well, some marketing organizations continue to struggle with the transi- tion from traditional to Digital Marketing. Not surprisingly, the two key barriers to embracing Digital Marketing are education and resources. Marketing organizations already stretched for time and money are reluc- tant to take on more responsibility or embrace change. Much of this is driven by Senior Management leadership. Barriers to Digital Marketing WHAT IS DIGITAL MARKETING? Senior Management that discounts or views Digital Marketing as just another channel option do not expend the resources to create engaging digital experiences, while those that see digital as the primary marketing channel see significant revenue gains.
  11. 11. 11DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE Digital Marketing & The MMO The wide variety of Digital Marketing opportunities has created a compel- ling need within the MMO to gain control of Digital Marketing. In most companies, Digital Marketing has grown organically with many independent initiatives cropping up to address one marketing need after another. Unlike the days of yore when all computers and systems were under the control of IT departments, Digital Marketing’s budgets, tools, and technol- ogies are spread across the organization and “in the cloud.” The challenge with that approach is that the success rate of Digital Marketing initiatives are limited when they do not include enterprise data integration with existing CRM, SFA, and Marketing Automation systems. To address that challenge for the MMO, this report, combined with our Solution Study Series, examine the primary platforms for five digital func- tions – Content Marketing, Social Media Marketing, Mobile Marketing, Video Marketing, and Public Relations. Overview DIGITAL MARKETING & THE MMO Our Digital Marketing Solution Studies can be best described as follows: Our Content Marketing Solution Study looks at the range of content platforms. We examine the landscape, vendors and solutions for the three foundation platforms – Web Content Management (WCM), Content Marketing (CMS), and Content Distribu- tion (CDS). These platforms and toolsets provide the structure that content marketers need to create relevant and personal- ized content for each of their individual audiences. CONTENT MARKETING Solution Study V I E W R E S O U R C E
  12. 12. 12DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE Our Social Media Marketing Solution Study examines Social Media strategies and processes on four key plat- forms – Social Listening, Social Engagement, Social Expe- rience, Social Analytics, and the major Social Networks. Our Public Relations Solution Study provides insights and analysis to help marketers understand the solutions available to help the modern PR practitioner. Our Video Marketing Solution Study examines the land- scape, vendors, and solutions for video development, production, and marketing. We evaluate the primary video hosting and sharing plat- forms that enable marketers to provide information, education, advice, and/or entertainment to their target audiences. Our Mobile Marketing Solution Study is designed to provide a solid understanding of the current Mobile Marketing environment. We examine the landscape, vendors, and solutions for two categories of Mobile Marketing – Mobile Application Development (MADP) and Mobile Content Development & Management (MCDP) – to enable marketers to incorporate mobile within their broader Digital Marketing Strategy. PUBLIC RELATIONS Solution Study VIDEO MARKETING Solution Study MOBILE MARKETING Solution Study SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING Solution Study V I E W R E S O U R C E V I E W R E S O U R C E V I E W R E S O U R C E V I E W R E S O U R C E DIGITAL MARKETING & THE MMO
  13. 13. 13DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDEDIGITAL MARKETING & THE MMO As the organization progresses in maturity through Level 2 (Neutral) and Level 3 (Contributor), it is able to provide evidence for its increasing revenue contribution through metrics that justify marketing spend and staff resources. At Level 4 (Profit Center) the organization has strong executive manage- ment support. It is led by an executive able to to fully staff and resource the organization for success. Metrics such as Customer Lifetime Value (CLV), Brand Equity measure- ments, and Customer Cost to Acquire provide quantitative support for marketing’s role. Not surprisingly, our studies show that more mature organizations, which also have a more coordinated approach to Digital Marketing, reap the benefits. As noted in our Digital Marketing Landscape Benchmark Study, 59% of the participants rated the creation of digital experience high or very high. Equally important, 76% of the study participants reporting revenue growth in the most recent fiscal year put a high priority on digital experience creation. The Modern Marketing Organization Demand Metric defines the Modern Marketing Organization (MMO) as driving the revenue of the company through the acquisition, engagement, development, and maintenance of long-term, cost effective relationships with customers. In brief, the MMO has responsibility for sustained revenue generation, Sales Enablement, and authority over all of the processes, technologies, tools, and talent that support the “customer universe.” That new responsibility for revenue generation is a key driver for Digital Marketing to create better digital experiences which will result in better leads, more sales opportunities, and sustainable customer relationships. As Demand Metric’s World Class Marketing Organization Maturity Model shows (next page), the more mature the organization, the more it contributes to the overall revenue picture. Demand Metric’s World Class Marketing Organization Maturity Model examines seven marketing components across four stages, illustrating common or best practices at each stage. At Level 1, the marketing organization is viewed as a Cost Center, primarily responsible for sales support with few resources and no way to effectively show its contribution to revenue. For a more detailed look at the MMO, please download our How-To Guide: The Modern Marketing Organization. V I E W R E S O U R C E
  14. 14. LEVEL 1 - Cost Center LEVEL 2 - Revenue Neutral LEVEL 3 - Revenue Contributor LEVEL 4 - Profit Center World Class Marketing Organization Leadership Staffing Budget Orientation Marketing plan aligned with and drives business planning CMO, VPs, Directors, Managers and Program Managers CMO compensation tied to revenue & marketing performance Budgeting is connected to revenue growth targets Very reactive, operational, not strategic, no plan No senior leadership in Marketing, possibly a Manager Informal roles & responsibilities, no job descriptions No budget exists, spending is Ad Hoc Still reactive, some campaign plan- ning, no strategic plan Director of Marketing, with Project or Program Managers Basic job descriptions in place but rarely updated A small budget exists for items such as trade shows, etc. Working from a strategic marketing plan and campaign plans VP, Director of Marketing, Program Managers Job descriptions & performance reviews done regularly A budget exists and business cases are created to justify spend WORLD CLASS MARKETING ORGANIZATION Maturity Model
  15. 15. Want to rate your organization’s World Class Marketing maturity with an interactive tool? Download our World Class Marketing Assessment and get started today! LEVEL 1 - Cost Center LEVEL 2 - Revenue Neutral LEVEL 3 - Revenue Contributor LEVEL 4 - Profit Center Processes Systems Metrics Executive Perspective of Marketing All processes are defined, measured, managed, and optimized All systems fully integrated, analytics & business intelligence Customer lifetime value (CLV), brand equity, cost to acquire, ROI Source of revenue, strategic function No processes, activities done ad hoc, reactive in nature Minimal marketing technology in place No metrics or a focus on adver- tising: #impressions, #ads Cost-center, not a strategic function Activities are repeatable and some processes are defined Legacy customer database or CRM system, email marketing Perational metrics such as open rates, click-thrus, registrations Cost-center, sales support function All processes are defined and some measurement in place CRM, marketing automation, with some integration. Cost per lead (CPL), renewal rate %, #sales qualified leads created Cost-center, flashes of brilliance WORLD CLASS MARKETING ORGANIZATION Maturity Model V I E W R E S O U R C E World Class Marketing Organization
  16. 16. 16DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE Digital Marketing Responsibilities As noted earlier, responsibility for the various elements of Digital Marketing spans the organization. Figure 3 (on the next page) shows an org chart for a mid-level to enterprise size Modern Marketing Organization. All roles are important here. If the company does not have headcount for each role, the functions can still be handled through marketing activities. DIGITAL MARKETING & THE MMO Within this structure, digital marketing responsibilities are shared by the CMO, VP of Demand Generation, Content Marketing Manager, Event Marketing Manager, VP of Strategic Communications, Community and Social Media Managers, Public Relations Manager, Product Marketing and Customer Experience Management Team.
  17. 17. 17DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE CMO Customer Advisory Council Customer Experience (CX) Management Team DIGITAL MARKETING & THE MMO VP Sales Enablement Marketing Operations Manager Lead Qualifica- tion Specialist CRM/Marketing Automation Systems Administrator VP Strategic Communications Community & Social Media Manager Public/Analyst/ Investor Rela- tions Manager Creative Director Graphic Designer Agency Project Manager(s) VP Product Development Market Analyst(s) Product Manager(s) Product Marketing Manager(s) Product Development Engineer(s) VP Customer Success Director, Professional Services Professional Services Consultant(s) Customer Success Manager(s) Customer Support Technician(s) Content Marketing Manager(s) Event Marketing Manager(s) Marketing Program Manager(s) Inside Sales Rep(s) VP Demand Generation FIGURE 3: MODERN MARKETING DEPARTMENT STRUCTURE
  18. 18. 18DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE Digital Marketing Landscape While electronic marketing has been around for decades in some form or another, Digital Marketing as we know it today traces its roots to the birth of the web. Digital Marketing has evolved in four stages, externally and inter- nally. Externally we have seen the customer experience mature from mass display and broadcast to personalized, real-time experiences, as follows: Display – Web pages (Web 1.0) Connection – Rich media content, social networks, blogs, Wikis (Web 2.0) Engagement – Convergence of content, social, mobile, and video experi- ences to create digital experiences Personalization – Personalized and localized content, delivered to personal devices in real-time through custom content and marketing apps History DIGITAL MARKETING LANDSCAPE Internally, we have seen tools and technologies mature from ad hoc point solutions to fully integrated, end-to-end systems connected across the Enterprise, as follows: Ad hoc – Point tools used by teams and departments Coordinated – Platforms that perform specific functions with coordi- nated tools, applications, and workflows Connected – Platforms connected to each other i.e. Web Content Management to Content Marketing to Social Listening API integration to enterprise CRM and MA systems Integrated – Comprehensive, end-to-end system integration of all Digital Marketing related platforms with tight integration to enterprise CRM, MA, and other legacy ERP systems.
  19. 19. 19DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE 1993 1994 1998 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2010 2011-2014 Stanford graduates create “Jerry and David’s Guide to the World Wide Web.” Amazon is launched in Seattle. The web is born and the first web page released by CERN April 30, 1993. Google launches & Aprimo (MA system) appears Digital Marketing Convergence iPhone introduced. Facebook launches. LinkedIn launches. YouTube launches. Twitter launches & first Video Marketing plat- forms become available. iPad introduced DIGITAL MARKETING LANDSCAPE FIGURE 4: DIGITAL MARKETING TIMELINE Figure 4 shows the timeline of some of the major milestones, vendors, and trends that have brought us the Digital Marketing environment we know today.
  20. 20. 20DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE The World Wide Web 1993: The web is born and the first web page released by CERN April 30, 1993. 1994: So many web pages are launched in one year that two Stanford graduates create “Jerry and David’s Guide to the World Wide Web.” In April, the Guide is renamed and re-launched as Yahoo. Also in this year, Amazon, one of the first large ecommerce sites, is launched in Seattle. 1995: The first Web Content Management Systems appear as extended document management systems. 1997: The first blog sites are launched. 1998: Google is launched. 1999 – 2004: Web 2.0 appears with rich media content (video, infographics, HTML5) combined with social networks and wikis. This becomes the standard platform for Digital Marketing. 2001 – 2003: Drupal & Wordpress are launched. 2008: Brightkit (now Hootsuite) is launched. Marketing Automation Social Media, Social Sharing, Mobile, Video 1998: Aprimo, first Enterprise Marketing Automation, appears. 1999: Silverpop, MindMatrix, Eloqua appear and extend Marketing Automation space. 2006-2009: Marketo, Hubspot, Paradot, Act-On, and second wave Marketing Automation vendors, appear. 2002: Friendster, social networking site, is launched. 2003: LinkedIn is launched. 2004: Facebook is launched. Social sharing begins with AddThis (2004). Also, Microsoft releases Single Sign-On Enterprise Security for Web Applications (Microsoft® ASP. NET) 2005: YouTube is launched and the Video Marketing land rush begins. Also, ShareThis is launched and advances social sharing. 2006: Twitter launches and Video Marketing platforms appear. 2007: The iPhone is introduced and mobile apps begin. 2010: The iPad is introduced. DIGITAL MARKETING LANDSCAPE
  21. 21. 21DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE Digital Marketing Convergence 2011 – 2014: Convergence of content marketing, social channels, web, and mobile & video development plat- forms enable truly personalized, localized digital expe- riences for each consumer and customer in real time. Playing Field Content Marketing Landscape As noted above, our analysis of the Digital Marketing landscape indicates that it is comprised of ten distinct categories. Of these, we have produced in-depth solution studies for five – Content Marketing, Social Media Marketing, Mobile Marketing, Video Marketing, and Public Relations. Each study looks at the benefits, trends, vendor landscape, and implementation strategies that impact that category. Here we summarize each landscape. All the of Digital Marketing Solution Studies include much more detailed information on each landscape and can be downloaded from the Demand Metric website. We have divided the Content Marketing vendor landscape into two primary categories. They are: Web Content Management (WCM) – these platforms provide the infrastructure and functionality for content creation and delivery across digital channels (web, blogs, search, social). They typically integrate with key internal CRM and MA systems. Content Marketing and Distribution (CMS/CDS) – these platforms provide the creation, organiza- tion, management, distribution, and measurement of content across all device types and channels. DIGITAL MARKETING LANDSCAPE
  22. 22. 22DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE CUTTING-EDGE Platforms NICHE Platforms COMPREHENSIVE Platforms STANDARD Platforms BASIC Platforms Figure 5 provides a combination of the vendor landscapes from WCM and CMS/CDS platforms. DIGITAL MARKETING LANDSCAPE FIGURE 5: CONTENT MARKETING VENDOR SOLUTION LANDSCAPE
  23. 23. 23DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE Deeper insights and analytics to enable marketers to view and respond to user engagement with relevant content. Tighter integration between content marketing and enterprise systems for a holistic customer view. Richer content and media ads that increase user engagement. More personalized experiences with rich media and relevant content through the integration of user social profiles. Increasing blend of owned, earned, and paid media to create higher level of “trusted content.” As the Content Marketing landscape evolves, Demand Metric expects to see the following trends take shape within the Web Content Management and Content Marketing and Distribution Platforms: DIGITAL MARKETING LANDSCAPE For our complete analysis on this segment, download our Content Marketing Solution Study. CONTENT MARKETING Solution Study V I E W R E S O U R C E
  24. 24. 24DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE We have divided the Social Media Marketing vendor landscape into five categories. They are: Overview Social Listening Platforms These are platforms and apps that focus on social moni- toring/response. These platforms monitor conversations across social networks for mentions of a company/brand to collect opinions of and experiences with that company, brand, or product. Social Analytics Platforms Social Networks Social Engagement Platforms Social Experience PlatformsThese are platforms that focus on the collection, measure- ment, and benchmarking of social activity, behavior, opinion, and emotion across social networks and media types (owned, earned, and paid social media). Most analytics plat- forms create detailed and individual customer profiles. These are the social environments in which social interaction and commerce take place. In this study, we look at the major social networks for B2B and B2C business activity, such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+ and YouTube. Demand Metric provides a full listing of Social Networks in our Top SocialMediaSitesDatabaseandSocialMediaChannelMap. These platforms focus on apps that deepen the engage- ment between the company and the customer. While most of these platforms offer a monitoring component, they provide a deeper level of engagement via apps for increasing ease and speed of social sharing, developing online communities, content creation & publishing, and/or gamification. These platforms focus on changing the experience the customer has with the company or brand. Social Experi- ence platforms usually include components of both moni- toring and engagement; however, they go a step further with functionality that changes the way the customer inter- acts with a company. These solutions serve to extend the reach of a brand deeper into the customer’s environment. DIGITAL MARKETING LANDSCAPE
  25. 25. 25DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE CUTTING-EDGE Platforms COMPREHENSIVE Platforms STANDARD Platforms BASIC Platforms Figure 6 provides a combination of the vendor landscapes for Social Listening, Social Engagement, Social Experience, and Social Analytics platforms. DIGITAL MARKETING LANDSCAPE FIGURE 6: SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING VENDOR SOLUTION LANDSCAPE
  26. 26. 26DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE The evolution of the Social Media Marketing landscape will continue on the same trajectory that we see it occurring today with more engage- ment, better experiences, and tighter integration across social networks. That trend, plus better and deeper analytics and tracking systems, will enable marketers to further refine the relationship between companies and their customers in social media. Digital campaigns will rely on social networks and channels to distrib- uted higher quality, more immersive content, and digital experiences that increase conversion rates and drive higher revenue. The social connection will continue to move from a transactional rela- tionship between marketer and customer to a “circle of peers” with the buyer “owning” as much of the outcome as marketing. DIGITAL MARKETING LANDSCAPE For our complete analysis on this segment, download our Social Media Marketing Solution Study. SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING Solution Study V I E W R E S O U R C E
  27. 27. 27DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE We have divided the Mobile Marketing vendor landscape into two primary categories. They are: Mobile Application Development (MADP) Mobile Content Development & Management (MCDP)These are platforms and applications that focus on the infrastructure and tools needed to design, build, test, deploy, and manage mobile applications. Platform functionality ranges from those that only support native apps to those that provide native, Web/HTML5 and hybrid apps, and APIs for enterprise integration. We included platforms used to optimize existing Websites in this category. These platforms focus on the delivery of content across mobile devices to provide an optimized experience. Key functionality includes content publishing and presen- tation; integration of data, services, and applications; as well as engagement programs like payment and mobile messaging campaigns. Mobile Marketing Landscape DIGITAL MARKETING LANDSCAPE For our complete analysis on this segment, download our Mobile Marketing Solution Study. MOBILE MARKETING Solution Study V I E W R E S O U R C E
  28. 28. 28DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE CUTTING-EDGE Platforms COMPREHENSIVE Platforms STANDARD Platforms BASIC Platforms Figure 7 provides a combination of the vendor landscapes from MADPs and MCDPs. DIGITAL MARKETING LANDSCAPE FIGURE 7: MOBILE MARKETING VENDOR SOLUTION LANDSCAPE
  29. 29. 29DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE Demand Metric expects the Mobile Marketing landscape to continue to grow rapidly for the foreseeable future. Demand Metric expects to see the following trends take shape for appli- cation development and mobile content platforms: Better management of applications and devices across the enterprise and through all channels. Deeper insights and analytics to enable marketers to view and respond to mobile app engagement. Tighter integration between mobile apps and enterprise systems for a more holistic customer view. Richer content and media ads that increase user engagement. Mobile as the “spear point” – the first connection a prospect has with the company, product, or service and, as such, defines their on-going relationship with the company. DIGITAL MARKETING LANDSCAPE
  30. 30. 30DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE Video Marketing vendors fall into four main tiers, which can be seen in Figure 8, based on their functionality in the following six categories: Video Hosting & Streaming – the video hosting & streaming component of these platforms centers around the capacity of solu- tions to upload, download, view, and process video files. Video Content Management – video content management involves all of the activities that support the storage, organization, and modi- fication of video content. Video Distribution & Sharing – the manner in which videos are distributed and shared can be critical to the success of a video’s performance. This component of Video Marketing focuses heavily on the delivery of video content. Video Optimization – optimizing videos is a critical function of Video Marketing that is often overlooked by many organizations. Video optimization ensures that your video content is getting ample traffic from the proper audience. Video Marketing Landscape 1 2 3 4 5 6 Demand Metric expects that the need and desire for video content will continue to grow radically among Enterprises and SMBs. CRM video sharing, social sentiment and sharing analytics, video asset to ROI metrics, and video mapping to the sales cycle are several features that will notably change the Video Marketing spectrum in the near future. As the market begins to saturate with category-specific vendors, Demand Metric believes consumers will continue to gravitate toward vendors that offer more comprehensive, end–to-end solutions rather than niche solutions. For our complete analysis on this segment, download our Video Marketing Solution Study. VIDEO MARKETING Solution Study V I E W R E S O U R C E Video Monetization – videos provide an array of benefits, as mentioned previously, that will, ultimately, increase an organization’s bottom line. However, generating revenue directly from videos has become central to Video Marketing. Video Analytics – metrics are an integral part of implementing any technology in order to identify and prove ROI. DIGITAL MARKETING LANDSCAPE
  31. 31. 31DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE CUTTING-EDGE Platforms NICHE Platforms COMPREHENSIVE Platforms STANDARD Platforms BASIC Platforms DIGITAL MARKETING LANDSCAPE FIGURE 8: VIDEO MARKETING VENDOR SOLUTION LANDSCAPE
  32. 32. 32DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE Vendors across the PR Solutions Landscape fall into four tiers based on the features and functionality of their offerings: Basic At the basic level, point solutions provide targeted func- tionality, commonly a media/influencer contact solution like Crowdbuilder, or news distribution such as PR.com. There is rarely integration with complementary PR solu- tions or functions. Standard Second tier vendors like Bulldog Media’s Media Pro or Business Wire bundle multiple PR functions, such as a media contact database with a news distribution func- tion. Some standard offerings are optimized for a specific vertical. Comprehensive The largest group of vendors fall into this tier, which includes solutions that provide the primary features of a PR solution, including media contact database & manage- ment, monitoring, distribution, and measurements & analytics. These areas of functionality are not integrated, or have just basic integration with each other. In other cases, functionality is provided through partnerships with other solution providers. Cutting Edge The most advanced tier is occupied by vendors like MarketWired, PR Newswire, and Vocus that provide a full suite of PR functionality, including a media contact database & contact management, online and traditional media monitoring, news distribution, and measurements & analytics with reporting. These functions are not only present in the solution suite, but are integrated to a moderate or high degree. Public Relations Landscape DIGITAL MARKETING LANDSCAPE
  33. 33. 33DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE CUTTING-EDGE Platforms COMPREHENSIVE Platforms STANDARD Platforms BASIC Platforms Figure 9 illustrates the Public Relations Vendor Landscape. DIGITAL MARKETING LANDSCAPE FIGURE 9: PUBLIC RELATIONS VENDOR SOLUTION LANDSCAPE
  34. 34. 34DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE The media and PR industry both continue to grapple with the new reality that everyone is becoming a publisher. The current crop of PR tools has always been helpful at securing earned media placements, and it is still important to do so. Where the tools are less effective is in identifying and reaching the broader spectrum of influencers whose names may not appear on a masthead, but have built an impressive following through social media or by blogging. PR solution providers must continue to develop ways for their users to identify and monitor the influencers that matter to them. DIGITAL MARKETING LANDSCAPE For our complete analysis on this segment, download our Public Relations Solution Study. PUBLIC RELATIONS Solution Study V I E W R E S O U R C E
  35. 35. 35DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE Our Digital Marketing Roles Matrix (next page) provides an at-a-glance view of the key components of Digital Marketing: roles, responsibilities, processes, technology, content, and metrics. Each of our six technology/vendor catego- ries is represented in the Digital Marketing Roles Matrix, as follows: The Organizational Big Picture Social Media Content Marketing Driven by the Community and Social Media Manager, Social Media processes, technologies, and platforms are used by Strategic Communications, Content Marketing, Community and Social Media, and Customer Experi- ence. The common metrics for Social Media include User Engagement, Sentiment Analysis, and Campaign ROI. Driven by the Content Marketing Manager, Content Marketing processes, technologies, and WCM platforms are used by Senior Management, Strategic Communi- cations, Community and Social Media Managers, Public Relations, and Product Marketing. The common metrics for Content Marketing include Content Views, Links Earned, Content Conversion, and Content Published. Mobile Marketing Mobile Marketing processes, technologies, and platforms are used primarily by Product Marketing, which is respon- sible for the development and deployment of mobile apps. That said, several other roles contribute to content development for these apps, including Strategic Commu- nications, Demand Generation, Content Marketing, Community and Social Media, and Customer Experience. Video Marketing Public Relations Video Marketing processes and technologies are used primarily by Content Marketing. However, several other roles contribute to video content, including Strategic Communications, Demand Generation, Community, Social Media, and Customer Experience. Driven by the Public Relations Manager, Public Relations processes, technologies, and platforms are used primarily by Public Relations and Strategic Communications to create relationships with external media, bloggers, and influencers for news stories and other earned media opportunities. DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES Digital Marketing Roles Matrix
  36. 36. 36DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE ROLES RESPONSIBILITIES PROCESSES TECHNOLOGY CONTENT METRICS Senior Management Revenue Accountability Staffing & Channel Management Reporting to CEO/Board Budgeting & Planning Reviews & Coaching Recruitment & Retention WCM Marketing Automation CRM Thought Leadership Blog Webinar Presentations Conference Keynotes Revenue by Channel Customer Lifetime Value, NPS Return on Customer (ROC) Strategic Communications Brand Strategy Digital Marketing Strategy Social Mobile Marketing Strategy Marketing Budget Agency Management Communications Management WCM Content Marketing Platforms Social Media Platforms Data Sheets, Whitepapers Case Studies/Testimonials Competitive Analysis Market Share, Profitability Brand Equity Content Usage Demand Generation Lead Generation & Events Inbound/Outbound Marketing Sales Opportunity Management Advertising/Sponsorship Lead Generation Tradeshows Marketing Automation/Email Digital Asset Management Event/Survey Management Advertising/SEO Email Campaigns Webinars Campaign ROI, Email Metrics Marketing Qualified Leads Contribution to Pipeline Content Marketing Web Content Management Content Marketing Content Distribution Content Creation Campaign Analysis Content Scoring WCM, Blogging Platforms, MA Content Mktg & Distribution Video Marketing Platforms Website and Blogs eBooks, Articles Videos Content Views, Links Earned Content Conversion Content Published Community & Social Media Online Community Management Social Listening Social Engagement Community Development Social Channel Management Social Reputation Management WCM Social Media Platforms Social Channels & Networks Posts, Tweets, Photos Forums, Chats, Comments Articles, Community News User Engagement Sentiment Analysis Campaign ROI Public Relations External Communications Media Relations Analyst Relations Influencer Identification Relationship Cultivation Content Creation/Distribution Media Contact Database News Distribution & Monitoring Analytics & Reporting News Content/Press Releases Thought Leadership Content Rich Social Media Content Mentions/Impressions Audience Growth & Engagement Sentiment Analysis Product Marketing New Product Development Mobile App Development Video Production/Development Product Launch Product Positioning Competitive Analysis WCM Mobile Development Platforms Video Production Platforms New Features/Ideas for R&D Gamification Competitive Analysis Avg. Revenue Per User Avg. Order Value Conversion Rate, Renewal Rate Customer Experience Interactive Experience Customer Satisfaction Customer Advocacy Customer Experience Customer Journey Mapping Customer Persona Creation Customer Profile Management Customer Support, Twitter Survey & Social Channels Buyer Personas Customer Journey Map Proposals, Presentations Customer Satisfaction Index Customer Lifetime Value Net Promoter Score (NPS) DIGITAL MARKETING ROLES MATRIX
  37. 37. 37DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDEDIGITAL MARKETING MATURITY MODEL Digital Marketing Maturity Model Level of Commitment The strength of the commitment and the focus on excellence in Dig- ital Marketing initiatives and campaigns drives other best practices. Planning World Class Digital Marketers create strategies, goals, and KPIs for every point of their Digital Marketing effort. Processes World Class Digital Marketers develop measurable processes for each phase to ensure progress and success. Our Digital Marketing Maturity Model (page 37-38) illustrates seven key components. These are: Orientation – the posture the organization takes toward the discipline of Digital Marketing and its importance to the organization for marketing, sales, and revenue generation. Leadership – the view of executive/senior management toward the role Digital Marketing plays in driving sales, revenue, and profits, and its inherent value to the company. Tools and Platforms – used to create, deploy, manage, and measure Digital Marketing initiatives and campaigns. Demand Generation – how well the organization performs in this core attribute of Digital Marketing. Digital Experience – how well the organization performs in this fast emerging area of Digital Marketing. Budget/Staff – how well Digital Marketing is resourced with time, talent, tools, money, and authority. Metrics – how Digital Marketing initiatives and campaigns are tracked, measured, managed, and reported. The move from Stage 1 (Ad Hoc) to Stage 4 (World-Class) is characterized by the following best practices: Resources World Class Organizations ensure that sufficient resources (time, talent, tools, money) exist for each initiative, campaign, and phase of their plan. Management World Class companies effectively manage the change, progress, and results of Digital Marketing efforts.
  38. 38. Orientation STAGE 1 - Undefined STAGE 2 - Progressive STAGE 3 - Mature STAGE 4 - World-Class Tools & Platforms No defined strategy or process for Digital Marketing or digital properties Ad hoc development; Point tools for Email, Content, and Social Media Marketing; No mobile or video apps Platforms that perform specific func- tions with coordinated tools, applica- tions, and workflows Platforms connected to each other i.e. Web Content Management to Content Marketing to Social Listening API integration to Enterprise CRM and MA systems Utilizes comprehensive, end-to-end system integration of all Digital Marketing related platforms with tight integration to Enterprise CRM, MA, and other legacy ERP systems Defined strategy and processes exist for Digital Marketing in pockets in the organization Defined, integrated strategy and processes exist for Digital Marketing across an Enterprise Defined, integrated strategy for Digital Marketing exists across an Enterprise; Campaigns are tracked and measured by effectiveness of engagement and conversion Leadership Does not see difference between Digital and Traditional Marketing Views digital as new marketing channel; Allocates budget & staff resources Recognizes that Digital Marketing is omni- channel and the key component in audi- ence engagement to drive preference & loyalty; Long term commitment; Willing participant; Resources for growth Views Digital Marketing as key component in customer engage- ment strategy and primary focus for marketing team; Organization aligned and measured around Digital Marketing’s contribution to revenue Digital Marketing DIGITAL MARKETING Maturity Model
  39. 39. Digital Experience Budget & Staff Metrics No focus on creating digital experience Allocated budget for Digital Marketing is less than 15%; Staff is contracted or coordinator role No formal measurements in place Budget allocated; Defined roles and responsibilities; Resources up to 45% of total marketing budget Analytics to monitor and track app performance like QR codes, SMS, web traffic by device, and mobile ads Budget with business case to justify spend; Dedicated marketing roles for Digital Marketing; Resources up to 60% of marketing budget Dashboard monitors app performance, device usage & location, and user engagement by content asset Budget connected to marketing goals; Organization aligned for maximum impact of Digital Marketing; Resources of 60 to 85% or more of marketing budget Enterprise-wide dashboard with visual representation of user acquisition and engagement by behavior, experience, brand reach, etc. Little awareness; Digital experi- ence occurs as an afterthought, not the driving force behind a Digital Marketing initiative; Sophistication of digital experience created is low with minimal brand impact Creation of digital experience is a priority for marketing teams and based on detailed journey mapping; Sophisticated digital experience aligned to buyer engagement experiences and measured on revenue impact Alignment and delivery of digital experiences based on persona expec- tations; Defined cross-functionally to ensure touchpoint consistency; Sophis- tication of digital experience created is very advanced and drives behavior STAGE 1 - Undefined STAGE 2 - Progressive STAGE 3 - Mature STAGE 4 - World-Class Digital Marketing Demand Generation Personalized & localized content delivered to personal devices in real- time through custom content and apps; Native mobile optimized; Proactive social listening with reliable feedback; Fully aligned with sales for enablement Relies on website landing pages with limited content targeting; Company profile on Social Media networking sites; Social posting is sporadic and ad hoc; Lack of audience awareness; One-way dialog Offers rich media content, Social Networks, blogs, Wikis (Web 2.0); Growing subscriber lists for Email; Social customer & audience aware- ness; Mostly one-way dialog Convergence of content, social, mobile, and video experiences to create full digital experiences for conversion and sales opportunities; True social dialog; Recogni- tion of preferred audience DIGITAL MARKETING Maturity Model Want to begin increasing your organization’s Digital Marketing maturity? Download our Digital Marketing Framework and get started today! V I E W R E S O U R C E
  40. 40. 40DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDEBOTTOM LINE Bottom Line Digital Marketing is changing the way companies do business. While adoption rates among companies and industries varies, most marketing departments have begun to devote a portion of their budget to Digital Marketing. Demand Metric’s analysis of Digital Marketing in this report and companion solution studies offers the following key conclusions: Content is King and Context is Critical. As content marketing evolves, users and customers will become less tolerate of content that is not directly relevant to their needs and the stage of their buying journey. The right Content Marketing strategy, combined with the right platform and tools, will ensure that the Modern Marketing Organization uses its content for optimum success. For many customers, their mobile device will define the way that they relate to your company, product, or service. Creating a positive mobile experience is crucial in keeping customers engaged. Social Media Marketing will become the primary engage- ment engine for customers evaluating or choosing products and services. Companies searching for new ways to deliver their message and increase brand recognition, as well as orga- nizations looking to improve the success of their current video marketing program’s performance, should consider researching and implementing a Video Marketing platform. Many companies that have been digital marketers for years still strain after incremental improvements in clicks and click- thru rates by tweaking email copy here or HTML code there. By creating rich digital experiences instead of chasing clicks, marketers can break away from the pack. Demand Metric’s key recommendation from this report is that Digital Marketing can make a significant and positive impact on the organizations that are employing it when they do so by following best prac- tices and processes that are holistically integrated.
  41. 41. 41DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE D I G I T A L M A R K E T I N G A C T I O N P L A N
  42. 42. DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE 42 Define requirements for Marketing and Sales Alignment with our Sales & Marketing Alignment Tool to ensure all activities are viable across the organization. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Build Organize Set Objectives Research Identify Plan Train Measure 1 Align Discover How To Align Your Sales and Marketing Efforts V I E W R E S O U R C E ACTION PLAN
  43. 43. DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE 43ACTION PLAN 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Build Organize Identify Train Measure 1 Align Make The Case For Digital Marketing To Key Stakeholders Build a Business Case for your Digital Marketing initiatives with our Business Case Template. V I E W R E S O U R C E Set Objectives Research Plan
  44. 44. DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE 44ACTION PLAN 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Organize Identify Train Measure 1 Align 2 Build Organize how your company will structure the Digital Marketing function. Use our Digital Marketing Roles Matrix to standardize roles & responsibilities for Digital Marketing. Understand All Required Digital Marketing Roles and Responsibilities V I E W R E S O U R C E Set Objectives Research Plan
  45. 45. 45DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDEACTION PLAN 4 5 6 7 8 9 Set Objectives Identify Train Measure 1 Align 2 Build 3 Organize Develop a solid 12-18 month plan for your Digital Marketing programs with: Content Marketing Strategy Scorecard Social Media Strategy Scorecard Mobile Marketing Strategy Scorecard Video Marketing Strategy Scorecard Public Relations Strategy Scorecard Plan Your Digital Marketing Programs In Advance V I E W R E S O U R C E Research Plan
  46. 46. DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE 46ACTION PLAN 5 6 7 8 9 Research Identify Train Measure 1 Align 2 Build 3 Organize 4 Review Potential Digital Marketing Vendors Begin the process of selecting a vendor to assist you in your Digital Marketing initiatives. Review the RFP templates in each of the Digital Marketing Solu- tion Studies as there are many solutions to choose from during this process. Content Marketing Solution Study Social Media Marketing Solution Study Video Marketing Solution Study Mobile Marketing Solution Study Public Relations Solution Study Set Objectives V I E W R E S O U R C E Plan
  47. 47. DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE 47ACTION PLAN 6 7 8 9 Identify Train Measure 1 Align 2 Build 3 Organize 4 5 Discover Key Digital Marketing Vendors Identify the key players in the market. We have already begun this process for you by researching a multitude of quality vendors. You can take a look at the vendors we have reviewed with Content Marketing Vendors Matrix Social Media Vendors Matrix Mobile Marketing Vendors Matrix Video Marketing Vendors Matrix Public Relations Vendors Matrix V I E W R E S O U R C E Set Objectives Research Plan
  48. 48. DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE 48ACTION PLAN 7 8 9 Plan Train Measure 1 Align 2 Build 3 Organize 4 5 6 Identify Ensure You Have a Strong Marketing Communications Strategy Develop an implementation strategy and communication plan to roll-out the initiative across the organization and through your channels. Use our MarCom Playbook to create your plan. Follow this simple step-by-step playbook to create a marketing communications plan that supports its marketing strategy. MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS PLAN Playbook & Toolkit V I E W R E S O U R C E Set Objectives Research
  49. 49. DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE 49ACTION PLAN 8 9 Train Measure 1 Align 2 Build 3 Organize 4 5 6 Identify 7 Train Your Team on Digital Marketing Best Practices Develop an education/training plan for all affected personnel: marketing, product development, operations, and sales. DIGITAL MARKETING Training Courses S TA R T L E A R N I N G Set Objectives Research Plan
  50. 50. DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE 50ACTION PLAN 9 Measure 1 Align 2 Build 3 Organize 4 5 6 Identify 7 8 Train Track and Measure Key Digital Marketing Metrics Measure the success of your Digital Marketing solutions imple- mentation and function with Content Marketing Metrics Dashboard Social Media Metrics Dashboard Mobile Marketing Metrics Dashboard Video Marketing Metrics Dashboard Public Relations Metrics Dashboard V I E W R E S O U R C E Set Objectives Research Plan
  51. 51. 51DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDEABOUT DEMAND METRIC Demand Metric provides Agile Marketing software powered by 1,000+ practical tools and resources to help our members complete their work faster and with more confidence. Our community of 125,000+ global members is composed of CEOs and business owners, marketing consultants and agen- cies, marketing executives and managers, and professionals who specialize in: product management, marketing operations, sales enablement, customer engagement, demand genera- tion, content marketing, project management, account-based marketing, and other disciplines. To learn more about Demand Metric, sign up for a free member- ship at: www.demandmetric.com V I E W W E B S I T E About Demand Metric
  52. 52. 52DIGITAL MARKETING BEST PRACTICES GUIDE © Demand Metric Research Corporation. All Rights Reserved. www.demandmetric.com Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Join Linkedin Group

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