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Team Meetings 
Dilawar Abbas
Introduction 
Plan your work and work your plan. 
Teams differ from groups because teams function from a common set of gro...
Meeting Techniques 
Ground Rules “I” Time Go-Around Brainstorming 
Road Map Parking Lot Prioritizing Slip Method
Ground Rules 
Ground rules help manage group dynamics and establish how the team will operate. Groups function most effect...
Team Roles 
1. The roles of facilitator, recorder, and timekeeper will rotate evenly among all team members. 
2. No team m...
“I” Time 
Definition of "I" Time 
"I" Time is individual time or introvert time. In this technique, people spend a few qui...
When to Use "I" Time 
When team members are diverse, "I" Time allows people to be alone with their thoughts without feelin...
Go Around 
Definition of a Go-Around 
In a go-around, the facilitator sequentially asks each team member to submit his or ...
Other Notes 
When combined with "I" Time, go-around allows people to have ownership of an idea even if they didn't suggest...
Brainstorming 
Definition of Brainstorming 
Brainstorming is often used as a first step in the creative process. It is rap...
When to Brainstorm 
If you want many ideas and an entirely new way of looking at things, consider brainstorming. 
Other No...
Slip Method 
Definition of the Slip Method 
The Slip Method allows team members to offer ideas and suggestions anonymously...
When to Use the Slip Method 
The slip method is useful when the topic may be sensitive. It allows people to "speak" freely...
Prioritizing 
Definition of Prioritizing 
Prioritizing is useful to cut through many items to identify what's important to...
1. Go-Around - Ask each team member to select his or her top choice from the collected list. Place a check mark next 
to t...
Parking Lot 
Definition of the Parking Lot 
Parking lots are temporary holding areas for ideas or suggestions that are not...
When to Use a Parking Lot 
An idea or suggestion that the team agrees merits additional discussion is brought up during th...
Road Map 
Definition of a Road Map 
A road map is an agenda format that organizes an effective meeting. It helps a team kn...
When to Use Road Maps 
Use road maps for all meetings! This is particularly true for longer, all-day meetings. 
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Facilitating effective meetings
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Team Meeting, how to conduct meeting effectively using meeting Techniques

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Team Meetings

  1. 1. Team Meetings Dilawar Abbas
  2. 2. Introduction Plan your work and work your plan. Teams differ from groups because teams function from a common set of ground rules, procedures and expectations. Team members know: • Why they are coming to meetings. • What they will do when they get there, and • What expectations are made of them when the meeting is completed. Any team or meeting can be improved by first establishing common ground rules and then utilizing simple meeting techniques.
  3. 3. Meeting Techniques Ground Rules “I” Time Go-Around Brainstorming Road Map Parking Lot Prioritizing Slip Method
  4. 4. Ground Rules Ground rules help manage group dynamics and establish how the team will operate. Groups function most effectively when they have up-front agreements on how they will conduct themselves, how decisions will be made, and when and where the team will meet. Establishing Ground Rules One way to establish ground rules is to ask team members what the team would look like if it were operating effectively and accomplishing all of its goals. The facilitator might ask people what the behavioral norms and conduct would be. The product of this dialogue could form the vision for the team. Meeting Times 1. The team will meet every other Monday from 9 to 11 a.m. Members agree to keep this time free for all meetings. 2. Meetings will rotate from office to office in order to give all members shared responsibility for room set-up.
  5. 5. Team Roles 1. The roles of facilitator, recorder, and timekeeper will rotate evenly among all team members. 2. No team member will be forced to fill a role he or she is uncomfortable with. Decision Making 1. The team will use the democratic process for all decisions. 2. All team members must provide input regarding decisions. Communication 1. Team members agree to maintain confidentiality regarding information shared in meetings. Remember this... Reviewing ground rules occasionally is a good idea. For example, if rotating the meeting location is troublesome, change that ground rule.
  6. 6. “I” Time Definition of "I" Time "I" Time is individual time or introvert time. In this technique, people spend a few quiet moments reflecting on questions or problems. It is NOT an interactive time, just the opposite. People are encouraged to simply think and reflect. How to Facilitate "I" Time Instruct team members to either sit quietly or leave the room briefly to find space where they can concentrate and focus. Establish a time limit, at least one minute. The time will vary depending on the topic or question the team is considering. During this period, facilitators may want to repeat the question or instructions, or display them on an easel pad, slide, or overhead.
  7. 7. When to Use "I" Time When team members are diverse, "I" Time allows people to be alone with their thoughts without feeling pressured or put upon. Use "I" Time when it seems necessary to add more structure to the process, or when team members have not previously had the opportunity to think about the question or issue. Remember this... "I" Time allows people to have ownership of an idea even if they didn't suggest it.
  8. 8. Go Around Definition of a Go-Around In a go-around, the facilitator sequentially asks each team member to submit his or her idea. If a person doesn't have anything to say, he or she can pass during a round. Team members can also get back in and contribute on subsequent rounds. How to Facilitate a Go-Around If you're facilitating a go-around collect only ONE idea per person at a time. Don't let one person dominate! When to Use a Go-Around Use go-around when you want a few good ideas and not an exhaustive list of possibilities.
  9. 9. Other Notes When combined with "I" Time, go-around allows people to have ownership of an idea even if they didn't suggest it. Go-around allows introverted people the chance to provide input without having to "push" their way into the conversation. Remember this... Go-around is a good method to use when people don't know one another.
  10. 10. Brainstorming Definition of Brainstorming Brainstorming is often used as a first step in the creative process. It is rapid-fire suggestions designed to get the creative juices flowing! Facilitate Brainstorming Key to a brainstorming session is not allowing members to judge or evaluate suggestions. That tends to stifle the creative process. Keep posing the question again and again to the group and remind everyone that there are no bad ideas. Even a clarifying question can suggest disapproval. For example, someone might suggest, "Let's post all our quarterly reports on the web site." In response, someone might ask a clarifying question, "Do you mean quarterly reports from just our unit, or the entire division?" It's a good question, but even the slightest interruption can bog down an otherwise productive session.
  11. 11. When to Brainstorm If you want many ideas and an entirely new way of looking at things, consider brainstorming. Other Notes Brainstorming represents divergent thinking to get many good ideas out on the table before converging them into workable solutions. Team members are encouraged to build on previous ideas, adding to the creativity and number of ideas. Remember this... Brainstorming works best when the pace is fast. Try to keep evaluative comments to a minimum. Brainstorming is often used as a first step in the creative process. It is rapid-fire suggestions designed to get the creative juices flowing!
  12. 12. Slip Method Definition of the Slip Method The Slip Method allows team members to offer ideas and suggestions anonymously. No one knows who made the suggestion. How to Facilitate the Slip Method Distribute 3x5 cards or similar pieces of paper to the team. Pose the question and assign a time limit. One to three minutes is good. More complex questions may require more time. Pose the question, and instruct the team to work independently, and not to share thoughts with one another. Once the team members have completed writing down their ideas, the facilitator can collect the cards and begin writing down the comments. All responses should be written down and no judging or evaluation should take place. If two comments are identical or similar, a check mark on the easel pad will indicate that more than one team member offered the idea.
  13. 13. When to Use the Slip Method The slip method is useful when the topic may be sensitive. It allows people to "speak" freely without fear of being identified. Also, if the team is cautious or new to sharing ideas, the slip method is useful for pulling ideas out of the team. Another benefit to the slip method is that it allows private or introverted team members the opportunity to participate. Remember this... The slip method is a good starting point, but it does not allow team members the opportunity to build on others' ideas. To facilitate this, follow the slip method with a team discussion or go-around to continue building ideas.
  14. 14. Prioritizing Definition of Prioritizing Prioritizing is useful to cut through many items to identify what's important to the team. Prioritizing is simply voting on the items, ideas or actions facing the team. How those votes are cast or collected is important. How to Facilitate Prioritizing A good rule of thumb is to allow each team member a number of votes equal to 1/4 of the total items on the list. For example, if the list numbers 12 ideas, each team member can vote for his or her top 3 selections. Here are some ideas for the process of prioritizing.
  15. 15. 1. Go-Around - Ask each team member to select his or her top choice from the collected list. Place a check mark next to the selection. Once everyone has indicated his or her first choice, continue the process for collecting subsequent choices. 2. Get-Up - Invite team members to come to the front of the room and indicate their own choices. It's good to get people moving about. Be sensitive to any requirements of people with disabilities. 3. Group Like Items - If two suggestions are identical or similar, group together as one. 4. Slip Method - If the topic is sensitive, use the slip method to prioritize. Direct the team to write down their selections, and collect responses. This avoids people having to publicly indicate their preferences. When to Prioritize Generally, prioritizing is good for helping the team determine what it values, and it can be used to come to a decision or determine the team's preference. Prioritizing is useful whenever the team begins to feel stifled or not sure what to do next. Remember this... Prioritizing is a useful technique for cutting through clutter and identifying those items or issues critical to the team.
  16. 16. Parking Lot Definition of the Parking Lot Parking lots are temporary holding areas for ideas or suggestions that are not directly on-topic with the issue facing the group. The facilitator maintains a separate, visible easel pad to capture these ideas. It reminds the team member that his or her idea will not be discounted and could form the basis for a follow-up agenda or discussion point. How to Facilitate a Parking Lot Introduce the concept of the parking lot early in the meeting. Keep a separate flip chart labeled "Parking Lot" visible in the front of the room. If an idea is submitted, and the team agrees it's worthy of discussion, but not at this time, write the idea down in the parking lot for later discussion. At the conclusion of the meeting, review the parking lot items. Some may have been resolved during the normal course of the meeting. Others may not. Poll the group for those parking lot items that should be discussed at the next meeting.
  17. 17. When to Use a Parking Lot An idea or suggestion that the team agrees merits additional discussion is brought up during the meeting. However, no one is quite sure how the suggestion "fits" or moves the process along. This is a good item for the parking lot. Once the idea is acknowledged and written down, move on. Address the parking lot issues later in the meeting or at a future meeting. Remember this... Parking lots are visible reminders. Be sure to keep your group's parking lot visible to everyone. Parking lot items should be part of the meeting record.
  18. 18. Road Map Definition of a Road Map A road map is an agenda format that organizes an effective meeting. It helps a team know and agree on what they want to address (the TOPIC) and how (the PROCESS) they will go about doing it. Road maps offer an advantage over traditional bulleted agendas because road maps define DESIRED OUTCOMEs and assign TIME limits to each step. How to Facilitate a Road Map Typically, the team leader and facilitator develop a road map prior to the meeting. The team leader is responsible for identifying the tasks and outcomes, and the facilitator selects the process. Road maps can be prepared prior to the meeting and confirmed when the meeting begins, or road maps can be developed at the onset of the meeting. Agenda items for the road map can be identified at the beginning of the meeting, which allows team input. While these options are available, it is preferable to have the roadmap completed by the facilitator and the meeting sponsor/convener but allowing the opportunity for additions by the team. Once the road map is agreed upon, the facilitator has the primary responsibility for ensuring that the team stays on course.
  19. 19. When to Use Road Maps Use road maps for all meetings! This is particularly true for longer, all-day meetings. TOPIC WHO DESIRED OUTCOME PROCESS TIME Get organized Team Lead Team members will know their roles, the ground rules and understand the road map Discussion 5 min Introduce new members Team Member New members welcomed Go-Around 5 min Current purchase order form and process Team Member Ways for improving the purchase order form and process identified Brainstorm, Slip method, Prioritize 45 min Break All Participants refreshed 10 min Purchase order improvement All A plan that will reduce purchase order processing time by I-time, Discussion 30 min plan at least 25% Action Items Team Member Items reviewed, responsibility assigned, deadlines set Prioritize 20 min Feedback and closure All Next steps defined, roles assigned, next meeting scheduled; strengths and weaknesses of meeting shared Go-Around 10 min
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