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Design Sprints 

for Awesome Teams
Running Design Sprints for

Rapid Digital Product Development
Image by citizenoftheworl...
@ahreelee@dmitroff
Dana Ahree
#DesignSprint #DesignThinking #MW17
Introductions
What are we talking about today?
DESIGN
THINKING
AGILEDESIGN
SPRINTS
A codified, repeatable process for problem-
solving, creativity, and innovation.
What is design thinking?
What is agile?
A software development framework that
focuses on incremental units of work,
iterative releases, and adaptiv...
What are design sprints?
A multi-step team process for answering
critical questions through researching,
prototyping, and ...
Our process
7
Sample sprint schedule
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
UNDER-
STAND
DEFINE
DIVERGE
BUILD TEST
CONVERGE
Image by the Stanford d.school
Let’s dive in!
Image from flickr by Carlos Javier / CC BY 2.0
your mission today:
Redesign the Cleveland
visitor experience.
Understand: methods
immerse
observe
engage
Immerse
Image courtesy
Maryanna Rogers
What? How? Why?
Observe
What people say, what people

do, and what they say they do

are entirely different things.

-Margaret Mead
What? How? Why?
Engage
Understand: Your turn
Interview best practices
Encourage stories
Use open-ended questions
Always ask “Why?”
Allow space for silence
Take notes!
Roles
Volunteer interviewee 

(should not be someone who lives in Cleveland)
Primary interviewer
Note-taker / Observer(s)
Decide on your roles
Interviewee moves to
another team
Conversation guide 3 rounds
Have you been here before?
(If yes) Tell me about the best part of that experience.
(If no, mo...
Define
Synthesize our information
Begin to reframe the problems

and opportunities
Identify user needs + insights
Image by ...
If I had 20 days to solve a problem,
I would take 19 to define it.
-Albert Einstein
Human emotional and physical
necessities.
Verbs, not nouns
Opportunities, not solutions
Needs are…
Something you can see from the
outside that your user cannot see.
An “aha,” a contradiction, a surprise
Insights are…
What does this girl need?
Needs + insights mapping
Insights:
What + why behind the needs
Needs:
Verbs, not nouns
Examples
Insights:
What + why behind the needs
To reach
To get
attention
To gainknowledge
She wants to feelsmarter than he...
Select 1 of your 3 interviewees
Which interview
stands out the most?
Which was the richest
or most surprising?
Your turn!
Needs:
Verbs, not nouns
10 min as a team
Insights:
What + why behind the needs
At least 2 
At least 5
Image by the Stanford d.school
Why do we use “How might we”?
Allow us to defer judgment during
brainstorming
Focus brainstorming in actionable
directions
Best practices
Use actionable verbs
help, make, foster, encourage, promote, support,
identify, celebrate
Don’t “bake in” t...
Actionable verbs
achieve
align
amplify
assemble
build
change
connect
construct
create
customize
develop
disrupt
educate
em...
Examples
How might we help her feel like an
adult?
HMW support her independence?
HMW build on her thirst for
knowledge?
HM...
Write at least 5 HMW statements
4 min on your own
Use actionable verbs
Don’t bake in the solution
Write ONE HMWper Post-it...
Post your HMWs on wall for team to see
1 min on your own
The best way to have a
good idea is to have
lots ofideas.
-Linus Pauling
Warm-up:
Remember our trip to …?
44
Brainstorm rules
Build on ideas / “yes, and”
Go for quantity
Go for wild ideas
Defer judgment
Be visual + capture all ideas
Idea generation with Crazy 8s
5 min on your own
Who had the most?
Prizes!!!
Pick one idea and storyboard it out
6 min on your own
Post + share
Post all storyboards on the wall
Elect a timekeeper in your team
Each individual gets 1 minute to share

his/...
Image by the Stanford d.school
Sticker voting
Identify 1 idea that the team would want
to move forward for prototyping
52
How it works
Stickers are like money—spend it where
and how you want!
Voting is a silent, solo activity
Criteria
Most likely to delight our user
RED
Easiest to implement/build
BLUE
[You can use different criteria in your own sp...
Silent voting on your own
3 min on your own
Most likely to delight our user
RED
Easiest to implement/build
BLUE
Most game-...
Come to consensus
4 min as a team
Most likely to delight our user
RED
Easiest to implement/build
BLUE
Most game-changing/b...
Image by the Stanford d.school
Product or service?
Welcome
to
Cleveland
Prototype examples
Mobile app
Image courtesy Ellen Deutscher
Mobile tour
In-gallery interactive
#mw2014proto
Program
Services
Web interface
Hand over your
prototype
Don’t ”sell” your idea
Ask “Why?”
Testing best practices
How many users?
Source: Nielsen, Jakob, and Landauer, Thomas K.: "A mathematical model of the finding of usability problems...
70
Name your prototype.
Something short and memorable. Example: Uber for tourists
Your names.
PROTOTYPE PLANNING WORKSHEET...
71
Name your prototype.
Something short and memorable. Example: Uber for tourists
Your names.
PROTOTYPE PLANNING WORKSHEET...
Test your assumptions.
Assumption Test with… Validated if…
Example: Tourists will want to spend a few
hours with a strange...
73
Name your prototype.
Something short and memorable. Example: Uber for tourists
Your names.
PROTOTYPE PLANNING WORKSHEET...
Name your prototype.
Something short and memorable. Example: Uber for tourists
Your names.
PROTOTYPE PLANNING WORKSHEET
De...
Wrapping up
Case study: The British Museum
“How might we improve wayfinding
in the British Museum?”
Start small
Design thinking resources
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szr0ezLyQHY
Tips for running your own sprints
Find a flexible space
Plenty of wall space
Food, music, and mess OK!
Invite a cross-functional group
Ideal group size is between 6-16
Appoint two sprint masters
Make your sprint work visible
Set your schedule
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Understand Define
Diverge
Build Test
Converge
Day 1 Day 2
Unders...
Assemble your supplies
Establish device rules
Image by Devon Christopher Adams on Flickr /https://www.flickr.com/photos/nooccar/10393631416/
Image by Devon Christopher Adams on Flickr /https://www.flickr.com/photos/nooccar/10393631416/
Make it fun!
Resources
Resources
www.thesprintbook.com
www.thesprintbook.com/sprintbot
Resources
Thoughtbot Playbook
http://playbook.thoughtbot.com
Google Design Sprint Methods Playbook
https://developers.goog...
Prototyping tools
Paper
Keynote

Keynotopia
Marvel
InVision
InDesign
and many others!
UNPAK
Retrospective
I Like I Learned I Wonder
dana@DesigningInsights.com
@dmitroff
mail@ahreelee.com
@ahreelee
DesignThinkingforMuseums.net
DesigningInsights.com
Thank y...
Design Sprints for Awesome Teams: Workshop at Museums & the Web 2017
Design Sprints for Awesome Teams: Workshop at Museums & the Web 2017
Design Sprints for Awesome Teams: Workshop at Museums & the Web 2017
Design Sprints for Awesome Teams: Workshop at Museums & the Web 2017
Design Sprints for Awesome Teams: Workshop at Museums & the Web 2017
Design Sprints for Awesome Teams: Workshop at Museums & the Web 2017
Design Sprints for Awesome Teams: Workshop at Museums & the Web 2017
Design Sprints for Awesome Teams: Workshop at Museums & the Web 2017
Design Sprints for Awesome Teams: Workshop at Museums & the Web 2017
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Design Sprints for Awesome Teams: Workshop at Museums & the Web 2017

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Slides from "Design Sprints for Awesome Teams: Running Design Sprints for Rapid Digital Product Development" at the 2017 Museums and the Web conference in Cleveland, Ohio.

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Design Sprints for Awesome Teams: Workshop at Museums & the Web 2017

  1. 1. Design Sprints 
 for Awesome Teams Running Design Sprints for
 Rapid Digital Product Development Image by citizenoftheworld on flickr / CC 2.0 Museums and the Web 2017 Los Angeles, CA | April 19, 2017 Dana Mitroff Silvers and Ahree Lee Designing Insights designing insights
  2. 2. @ahreelee@dmitroff Dana Ahree #DesignSprint #DesignThinking #MW17 Introductions
  3. 3. What are we talking about today? DESIGN THINKING AGILEDESIGN SPRINTS
  4. 4. A codified, repeatable process for problem- solving, creativity, and innovation. What is design thinking?
  5. 5. What is agile? A software development framework that focuses on incremental units of work, iterative releases, and adaptive planning. Image by Dave Gray on flickr / CC BY-ND 2.0
  6. 6. What are design sprints? A multi-step team process for answering critical questions through researching, prototyping, and testing ideas with customers.
  7. 7. Our process 7
  8. 8. Sample sprint schedule Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday UNDER- STAND DEFINE DIVERGE BUILD TEST CONVERGE
  9. 9. Image by the Stanford d.school
  10. 10. Let’s dive in!
  11. 11. Image from flickr by Carlos Javier / CC BY 2.0 your mission today: Redesign the Cleveland visitor experience.
  12. 12. Understand: methods immerse observe engage
  13. 13. Immerse Image courtesy Maryanna Rogers
  14. 14. What? How? Why? Observe
  15. 15. What people say, what people
 do, and what they say they do
 are entirely different things.
 -Margaret Mead
  16. 16. What? How? Why? Engage
  17. 17. Understand: Your turn
  18. 18. Interview best practices Encourage stories Use open-ended questions Always ask “Why?” Allow space for silence Take notes!
  19. 19. Roles Volunteer interviewee 
 (should not be someone who lives in Cleveland) Primary interviewer Note-taker / Observer(s)
  20. 20. Decide on your roles Interviewee moves to another team
  21. 21. Conversation guide 3 rounds Have you been here before? (If yes) Tell me about the best part of that experience. (If no, move on to next question) What are you looking forward to experiencing in Cleveland? Why? Tell me a story about a visit to another city that stands out in your memory. What was the best part of that experience? Why? What was the worst part of that experience? Why? 4 minutes x 3 interviews
  22. 22. Define Synthesize our information Begin to reframe the problems
 and opportunities Identify user needs + insights Image by Alan Cleaver on Unsplash
  23. 23. If I had 20 days to solve a problem, I would take 19 to define it. -Albert Einstein
  24. 24. Human emotional and physical necessities. Verbs, not nouns Opportunities, not solutions Needs are…
  25. 25. Something you can see from the outside that your user cannot see. An “aha,” a contradiction, a surprise Insights are…
  26. 26. What does this girl need?
  27. 27. Needs + insights mapping Insights: What + why behind the needs Needs: Verbs, not nouns
  28. 28. Examples Insights: What + why behind the needs To reach To get attention To gainknowledge She wants to feelsmarter than herbrother—he’s beengetting all theattention these days! To feel like an adult Needs: Verbs, not nouns
  29. 29. Select 1 of your 3 interviewees Which interview stands out the most? Which was the richest or most surprising?
  30. 30. Your turn! Needs: Verbs, not nouns 10 min as a team Insights: What + why behind the needs At least 2 At least 5
  31. 31. Image by the Stanford d.school
  32. 32. Why do we use “How might we”? Allow us to defer judgment during brainstorming Focus brainstorming in actionable directions
  33. 33. Best practices Use actionable verbs help, make, foster, encourage, promote, support, identify, celebrate Don’t “bake in” the solution Can you think of at least 50 ways to solve it?
  34. 34. Actionable verbs achieve align amplify assemble build change connect construct create customize develop disrupt educate empower encourage energize engage explore generate help ignite imagine increase inspire instill invent leverage maximize motivate organize produce rally reduce reflect reframe replicate repurpose serve solve support transform unleash Based on the work of Mary Cantwell at www.DEEPdesignthinking.com.
  35. 35. Examples How might we help her feel like an adult? HMW support her independence? HMW build on her thirst for knowledge? HMW ignite a life-long love for reading? HMW channel her annoyance with her brother into something positive?
  36. 36. Write at least 5 HMW statements 4 min on your own Use actionable verbs Don’t bake in the solution Write ONE HMWper Post-it Make them legible!
  37. 37. Post your HMWs on wall for team to see 1 min on your own
  38. 38. The best way to have a good idea is to have lots ofideas. -Linus Pauling
  39. 39. Warm-up: Remember our trip to …? 44
  40. 40. Brainstorm rules Build on ideas / “yes, and” Go for quantity Go for wild ideas Defer judgment Be visual + capture all ideas
  41. 41. Idea generation with Crazy 8s 5 min on your own
  42. 42. Who had the most? Prizes!!!
  43. 43. Pick one idea and storyboard it out 6 min on your own
  44. 44. Post + share Post all storyboards on the wall Elect a timekeeper in your team Each individual gets 1 minute to share
 his/her solution with team mates 1 min per person
  45. 45. Image by the Stanford d.school
  46. 46. Sticker voting Identify 1 idea that the team would want to move forward for prototyping 52
  47. 47. How it works Stickers are like money—spend it where and how you want! Voting is a silent, solo activity
  48. 48. Criteria Most likely to delight our user RED Easiest to implement/build BLUE [You can use different criteria in your own sprint!] Most game-changing/breakthrough YELLOW
  49. 49. Silent voting on your own 3 min on your own Most likely to delight our user RED Easiest to implement/build BLUE Most game-changing/breakthrough YELLOW
  50. 50. Come to consensus 4 min as a team Most likely to delight our user RED Easiest to implement/build BLUE Most game-changing/breakthrough YELLOW
  51. 51. Image by the Stanford d.school
  52. 52. Product or service? Welcome to Cleveland
  53. 53. Prototype examples
  54. 54. Mobile app Image courtesy Ellen Deutscher
  55. 55. Mobile tour
  56. 56. In-gallery interactive
  57. 57. #mw2014proto Program
  58. 58. Services
  59. 59. Web interface
  60. 60. Hand over your prototype Don’t ”sell” your idea Ask “Why?” Testing best practices
  61. 61. How many users? Source: Nielsen, Jakob, and Landauer, Thomas K.: "A mathematical model of the finding of usability problems, "Proceedings of ACM INTERCHI'93 Conference (Amsterdam,The Netherlands, 24-29 April 1993), pp. 206-213.
  62. 62. 70 Name your prototype. Something short and memorable. Example: Uber for tourists Your names. PROTOTYPE PLANNING WORKSHEET Describe it in one sentence. Example: On-demand, personalized, private tours of Cleveland with local residents Test your assumptions. Attach your winning storyboard here. Tape it down. Assumption Test with… Validated if… Example: Tourists will want to spend a few hours with a stranger in his/her car Fake sign-up form Number of sign-ups Example: Locals know enough to provide good tours Follow-up interviews with passengers who take the mock tour Users respond positively to the tour Design Sprints for Awesome Teams, Dana Mitroff Silvers and Ahree Lee, Museums and the Web 2017 www.designinginsights.com Prototype planning worksheet
  63. 63. 71 Name your prototype. Something short and memorable. Example: Uber for tourists Your names. PROTOTYPE PLANNING WORKSHEET Describe it in one sentence. Example: On-demand, personalized, private tours of Cleveland with local residents Attach your winning storyboard here. Tape it down. Prototype planning worksheet
  64. 64. Test your assumptions. Assumption Test with… Validated if… Example: Tourists will want to spend a few hours with a stranger in his/her car Fake sign-up form Number of sign-ups Example: Locals know enough to provide good tours Follow-up interviews with passengers who take the mock tour Users respond positively to the tour Design Sprints for Awesome Teams, Dana Mitroff Silvers and Ahree Lee, Museums and the Web 2017 www.designinginsights.com Test your assumptions
  65. 65. 73 Name your prototype. Something short and memorable. Example: Uber for tourists Your names. PROTOTYPE PLANNING WORKSHEET Describe it in one sentence. Example: On-demand, personalized, private tours of Cleveland with local residents Test your assumptions. Attach your winning storyboard here. Tape it down. Assumption Test with… Validated if… Example: Tourists will want to spend a few hours with a stranger in his/her car Fake sign-up form Number of sign-ups Example: Locals know enough to provide good tours Follow-up interviews with passengers who take the mock tour Users respond positively to the tour Design Sprints for Awesome Teams, Dana Mitroff Silvers and Ahree Lee, Museums and the Web 2017 www.designinginsights.com 10 min as a team Prototype planning worksheet
  66. 66. Name your prototype. Something short and memorable. Example: Uber for tourists Your names. PROTOTYPE PLANNING WORKSHEET Describe it in one sentence. Example: On-demand, personalized, private tours of Cleveland with local residents Test your assumptions. Attach your winning storyboard here. Tape it down. Assumption Test with… Validated if… Example: Tourists will want to spend a few hours with a stranger in his/her car Fake sign-up form Number of sign-ups Example: Locals know enough to provide good tours Follow-up interviews with passengers who take the mock tour Users respond positively to the tour Design Sprints for Awesome Teams, Dana Mitroff Silvers and Ahree Lee, Museums and the Web 2017 www.designinginsights.com 2 minutes per team 74 Share-outs
  67. 67. Wrapping up
  68. 68. Case study: The British Museum
  69. 69. “How might we improve wayfinding in the British Museum?”
  70. 70. Start small
  71. 71. Design thinking resources https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szr0ezLyQHY
  72. 72. Tips for running your own sprints
  73. 73. Find a flexible space Plenty of wall space Food, music, and mess OK!
  74. 74. Invite a cross-functional group
  75. 75. Ideal group size is between 6-16
  76. 76. Appoint two sprint masters
  77. 77. Make your sprint work visible
  78. 78. Set your schedule Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Understand Define Diverge Build Test Converge Day 1 Day 2 Understand Converge Define Build Diverge Test Or whatever schedule works for you!
  79. 79. Assemble your supplies
  80. 80. Establish device rules Image by Devon Christopher Adams on Flickr /https://www.flickr.com/photos/nooccar/10393631416/
  81. 81. Image by Devon Christopher Adams on Flickr /https://www.flickr.com/photos/nooccar/10393631416/ Make it fun!
  82. 82. Resources
  83. 83. Resources www.thesprintbook.com
  84. 84. www.thesprintbook.com/sprintbot
  85. 85. Resources Thoughtbot Playbook http://playbook.thoughtbot.com Google Design Sprint Methods Playbook https://developers.google.com/design-sprint/product/
  86. 86. Prototyping tools Paper Keynote
 Keynotopia Marvel InVision InDesign and many others!
  87. 87. UNPAK Retrospective I Like I Learned I Wonder
  88. 88. dana@DesigningInsights.com @dmitroff mail@ahreelee.com @ahreelee DesignThinkingforMuseums.net DesigningInsights.com Thank you!

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