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Presented by:
Debanjan Parbat
M.E in Biomedical Engineering
1st year
Roll No: 001430201008
Medical applications for 3D printing are expanding rapidly
and are expected to revolutionize health care .The application
...
Medical uses for 3D printing, both actual and potential, can
be organized into several broad categories, such as:
 Tissue...
 3D Printing is the reverse of traditional
machining where material is removed from a
block by drilling, cutting, chisell...
 A 3D scanner can also be used to copy an existing
object. The scanner makes a 3D digital copy of an
object and puts it i...
The type of 3D printer chosen for an
application often depends on the materials to
be used and how the layers in the finis...
 Selective Laser Sintering
 An SLS printer uses powdered material as the
substrate for printing new objects. A laser
dra...
 Thermal inkjet Printing
 Inkjet printing is a “noncontact” technique that
uses thermal, electromagnetic, or piezoelectr...
 Fused Deposition Modeling
 An FDM printer uses a printhead similar to an
inkjet printer. However, instead of ink, beads...
 A computer-aided bioadditive manufacturing
process has emerged to deposit living cells
together with hydrogel-based scaf...
The figure below shows different Bioprinting techniques including
 (a) laser-based writing of cells,
 (b) inkjet-based s...
The current medical uses of 3D printing can be
organized into several broad categories:
 tissue and organ fabrication;
 ...
 Organ printing takes advantage of 3D printing
technology to produce cells, biomaterials, and cell
laden biomaterials ind...
A process for bioprinting organs has emerged:
 1) create a blueprint of an organ with its vascular
architecture;
 2) gen...
 The precise placement of multiple cell types is required
to fabricate thick and complex organs, and for the
simultaneous...
 Implants and prostheses can be made in
nearly any imaginable geometry through the
translation of xray, MRI, or CT scans ...
Scientists have created a revolutionary new electronic membrane that could replace
pacemakers, fitting over a heart to kee...
 The individual variances and complexities of the
human body make the use of 3Dprinted models
ideal for surgical preparat...
 3D printing technologies are already being used
in pharmaceutical research and fabrication, and
they promise to be trans...
 The primary 3D printing technologies used for
pharmaceutical production are inkjet based or inkjet
powder based 3D print...
 Personalized 3D printed drugs may particularly
benefit patients who are known to have a
pharmacogenetic polymorphism or ...
 The manufacturing and distribution of drugs by
pharmaceutical companies could be replaced by
emailing databases of medic...
 In the future, it could even be possible to take
stem cells from a child’s baby teeth for lifelong
use as a tool kit for...
 3D printing has become a useful and potentially
transformative tool in a number of different fields,
including medicine....
 C. Lee Ventola, MS , Medical Applications for 3D
Printing – Current and Projected Uses, P T. 2014 Oct;
39(10): 704–711. ...
Applications of 3 d printing in biomedical engineering
Applications of 3 d printing in biomedical engineering
Applications of 3 d printing in biomedical engineering
Applications of 3 d printing in biomedical engineering
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Applications of 3 d printing in biomedical engineering

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This presentation deals with the recent and futuristic trends in the field of 3D Printing technology and its applications in the field of bio engineering and medical applications. The 3D printing technology can change the perception of the whole manufacturing industry to health care applications.

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Applications of 3 d printing in biomedical engineering

  1. 1. Presented by: Debanjan Parbat M.E in Biomedical Engineering 1st year Roll No: 001430201008
  2. 2. Medical applications for 3D printing are expanding rapidly and are expected to revolutionize health care .The application of 3D printing in medicine can provide many benefits, including:  Customization and personalization of medical products, drugs, and equipment;  Cost effectiveness;  Increased productivity;  The democratization of design and manufacturing; and  Enhanced collaboration.
  3. 3. Medical uses for 3D printing, both actual and potential, can be organized into several broad categories, such as:  Tissue and organ fabrication;  Creation of customized prosthetics, implants, and anatomical models; and  Pharmaceutical research regarding drug dosage forms, delivery, and discovery. However, it should be cautioned that despite recent significant and exciting medical advances involving 3D printing, notable scientific and regulatory challenges remain and the most transformative applications for this technology will need time to evolve.
  4. 4.  3D Printing is the reverse of traditional machining where material is removed from a block by drilling, cutting, chiselling, etc. for making objects. In 3D Printing an object is created by laying successive layers of materials as per requirement. This process is also known as additive manufacturing.  The process of printing 3D objects starts with making a virtual design of the object you want to create , using one of the supported computer aided design(CAD) software.
  5. 5.  A 3D scanner can also be used to copy an existing object. The scanner makes a 3D digital copy of an object and puts it into a 3D modelling program. This 3D model file is sliced into thousands of horizontal layers which are then printed by a 3D printer, layer by layer, creating the entire 3D object.  It is important to note that two dimensional (2D) radiographic images, such as x rays, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or computerized tomography (CT) scans, can be converted to digital 3D print files, allowing the creation of complex, customized anatomical and medical structures
  6. 6. The type of 3D printer chosen for an application often depends on the materials to be used and how the layers in the finished product are bonded. The three most commonly used 3D printer technologies in medical applications are:  Selective Laser Sintering (SLS),  Thermal Inkjet(TIJ) printing, and  Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM)
  7. 7.  Selective Laser Sintering  An SLS printer uses powdered material as the substrate for printing new objects. A laser draws the shape of the object in the powder, fusing it together.
  8. 8.  Thermal inkjet Printing  Inkjet printing is a “noncontact” technique that uses thermal, electromagnetic, or piezoelectric technology to deposit tiny droplets of “ink” (actual ink or other materials) onto a substrate according to digital instructions.
  9. 9.  Fused Deposition Modeling  An FDM printer uses a printhead similar to an inkjet printer. However, instead of ink, beads of heated plastic are released from the print head as it moves, building the object in thin layers.
  10. 10.  A computer-aided bioadditive manufacturing process has emerged to deposit living cells together with hydrogel-based scaffolds for 3-D tissue and organ fabrication.  It uses bioadditive manufacturing technologies, including laser-based writing , inkjet-based printing , and extrusion-based deposition .  Bioprinting offers great precision on spatial placement of the cells themselves, rather than providing scaffold support alone.
  11. 11. The figure below shows different Bioprinting techniques including  (a) laser-based writing of cells,  (b) inkjet-based systems, and  (c) extrusion-based deposition
  12. 12. The current medical uses of 3D printing can be organized into several broad categories:  tissue and organ fabrication;  creating prosthetics, implants, and anatomical models; and  pharmaceutical research concerning drug discovery, delivery, and dosage forms.
  13. 13.  Organ printing takes advantage of 3D printing technology to produce cells, biomaterials, and cell laden biomaterials individually or in tandem, layer by layer, directly creating 3D tissuelike structures.  Various materials are available to build the scaffolds, depending on the desired strength, porosity, and type of tissue, with hydrogels usually considered to be most suitable for producing soft tissues.  Although 3D bioprinting systems can be laser based, inkjet based, or extrusion based, Inkjet based bioprinting is most common.
  14. 14. A process for bioprinting organs has emerged:  1) create a blueprint of an organ with its vascular architecture;  2) generate a bioprinting process plan;  3) isolate stem cells;  4) differentiate the stem cells into organ specific cells;  5) prepare bioink reservoirs with organ specific cells, blood vessel cells, and support medium and load them into the printer;  6) bioprint; and  7) place the bioprinted organ in a bioreactor prior to transplantation.
  15. 15.  The precise placement of multiple cell types is required to fabricate thick and complex organs, and for the simultaneous construction of the integrated vascular or microvascular system that is critical for these organs to function. Tissue spheroids for blood vessel printing: (a) Deposition of straight filaments containing a string of tissue spheroids (stained in white) with agarose filaments as support material (stained in blue) both around cellular filaments and inside the core, (b) design for multicellular assembly with (c) printed samples with human umbilical vein smooth muscle cells and human skin fibroblast cells
  16. 16.  Implants and prostheses can be made in nearly any imaginable geometry through the translation of xray, MRI, or CT scans into digital .stl 3D print files.  In this way, 3D printing has been used successfully in the health care sector to make both standard and complex customized prosthetic limbs and surgical implants, sometimes within 24hours. This approach has been used to fabricate dental, spinal, and hip implants.
  17. 17. Scientists have created a revolutionary new electronic membrane that could replace pacemakers, fitting over a heart to keep it beating regularly over an indefinite period of time. The device uses a “spider-web-like network of sensors and electrodes” to continuously monitor the heart’s electrical activity and could, in the future, deliver electrical shocks to maintain a healthy heart-rate. Researchers used computer modelling technology and a 3D-printer to create a prototype membrane and fit it to a rabbit’s heart, keeping the organ operating perfectly “outside of the body in a nutrient and oxygen-rich solution”.
  18. 18.  The individual variances and complexities of the human body make the use of 3Dprinted models ideal for surgical preparation.  3Dprinted models can be useful beyond surgical planning.  3D printed neuroanatomical models can be particularly helpful to neurosurgeons by providing a representation of some of the most complicated structures in the human body.  Complex spinal deformities can also be studied better through the use of a 3D model.
  19. 19.  3D printing technologies are already being used in pharmaceutical research and fabrication, and they promise to be transformative .  Advantages of 3D printing include precise control of droplet size and dose, high reproducibility, and the ability to produce dosage forms with complex drug release profiles.  Complex drug manufacturing processes could also be standardized through use of 3D printing to make them simpler and more viable.  3D printing technology could be very important in the development of personalized medicine,too.
  20. 20.  The primary 3D printing technologies used for pharmaceutical production are inkjet based or inkjet powder based 3D printing.  In inkjet based drug fabrication, inkjet printers are used to spray formulations of medications and binders in small droplets at precise speeds, motions, and sizes onto a substrate. The most commonly used substrates include different types of cellulose, coated or uncoated paper, microporous bioceramics, glass scaffolds, metal alloys, and potato starch films, among others.  In powder based 3D printing, the inkjet printer head sprays the “ink” onto the powder foundation. When the ink contacts the powder, it hardens and creates a solid dosage form, layer by layer. The ink can include active ingredients as well as binders and other inactive ingredients. After the 3D printed dosage form is dry, the solid object is removed from the surrounding loose powder substrate.
  21. 21.  Personalized 3D printed drugs may particularly benefit patients who are known to have a pharmacogenetic polymorphism or who use medications with narrow therapeutic indices.  Pharmacists could analyze a patient’s pharmacogenetic profile, as well as other characteristics such as age, race, or gender, to determine an optimal medication dose.  A pharmacist could then print and dispense the personalized medication via an automated 3D printing system.  If necessary, the dose could be adjusted further based on clinical response.
  22. 22.  The manufacturing and distribution of drugs by pharmaceutical companies could be replaced by emailing databases of medication formulations to pharmacies for on demand drug printing. This would cause existing drug manufacturing and distribution methods to change drastically and become more cost effective.  The most advanced 3D printing application that is anticipated is the bioprinting of complex organs. It has been estimated that we are less than 20 years from a fully functioning printable heart.  It may also be possible to print out a patient’s tissue as a strip that can be used in tests to determine what medication will be most effective.
  23. 23.  In the future, it could even be possible to take stem cells from a child’s baby teeth for lifelong use as a tool kit for growing and developing replacement tissues and organs.  In situ printing, in which implants or living organs are printed in the human body during operations, is another anticipated future trend. Through use of 3D bioprinting, cells, growth factors, and biomaterial scaffolding can be deposited to repair lesions of various types and thicknesses with precise digital control.  Advancements in robotic bioprinters and robot assisted surgery may also be integral to the evolution of this technology.
  24. 24.  3D printing has become a useful and potentially transformative tool in a number of different fields, including medicine. As printer performance, resolution, and available materials have increased, so have the applications.  Researchers continue to improve existing medical applications that use 3D printing technology and to explore new ones.  The medical advances that have been made using 3D printing are already significant and exciting, but some of the more revolutionary applications, such as organ printing, will need time to evolve.
  25. 25.  C. Lee Ventola, MS , Medical Applications for 3D Printing – Current and Projected Uses, P T. 2014 Oct; 39(10): 704–711. [PMC Free Article] [Pub Med]  Ibrahim T. Ozbolat and Yin Yu , Bioprinting Toward Organ Fabrication: Challenges and Future Trends, IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 60, NO. 3, MARCH 2013.  www.fabathome.org  www.myminifactory.com  www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

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