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SEL, Emotional intelligence & Emotional Equity

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A critical look at the current trends in SEL and Emotional Intelligence with Emotional Equity as a critical approach to providing integrative support

Publié dans : Formation
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SEL, Emotional intelligence & Emotional Equity

  1. 1. Social Emotional Learning (CASEL) Emotional Intelligence (RULER) & Emotional Equity Connected to Integrative “Thriving” Kurt Love, Ph.D. Central Connecticut State University
  2. 2. Artist: Jessica Perlstein
  3. 3. Marc Brackett RULER
  4. 4. RULER (Emotional Intelligence)
  5. 5. Mood Meter Emotional Intelligence Our ability to identify and communicate our emotions clearly and use emotions as “guideposts” in order for us to make meaningful and intentional decisions.
  6. 6. To What Extent Do Schools Help or Harm?
  7. 7. To What Extent Do Schools Help or Harm? Social Emotional Learning (CASEL) Emotional Intelligence (RULER) Culturally Responsive Teaching Character Education Anti-bullying Parents’ Nights Community Learning Events Testing & anxiety Tracking (internal re- segregation by race/class) Bullying ISS/OSS/expulsion Culturally biased curriculum Over-identification of students of color for SPED Globally competitive, 21st Century Learners (employeeism) Loss of purpose/meaning Dehumanizing/devaluing of exploited people Lock-down drills & school shootings Condescending teachers Reductive, decontextualized, irrelevant learning Trauma-Informed or Traumatizing?
  8. 8. What is missing from RULER and CASEL?
  9. 9. What is missing from RULER and CASEL?
  10. 10. Sustainability (external stability) Well-being (internal stability)
  11. 11. Sustainability (external stability) Well-being (internal stability) Currentlyseenasseparate
  12. 12. Well-being (internal stability) + Sustainability (external stability) = Thriving Thriving needs us to have an integrative view of well-being and sustainability
  13. 13. Ideology of greed (exploitation for wealth concentration) Well-being (limited to the role of “pre- employee”) Current push in public schools as “social justice” and “equity”
  14. 14. Legalized exploitation (exploitation for wealth concentration)
  15. 15. Ideology of greed (exploitation for wealth concentration) Well-being (student = “pre-employee”) Current push in public schools as “social justice” and “equity”Legalized exploitation (exploitation for wealth concentration) U.S. Department of Education Mission Statement: ED's mission is to promote student achievement and preparation for global competitiveness by fostering educational excellence and ensuring equal access. Societal Impact on Well-being of Students
  16. 16. To What Extent Do Schools Mirror Stresses of Upper Middle Class Employees? Testing & anxiety Tracking (internal re- segregation by race/class) Bullying ISS/OSS/expulsion Culturally biased curriculum Over-identification of students of color for SPED Globally competitive, 21st Century Learners (employeeism) Loss of purpose/meaning Dehumanizing/devaluing of exploited people Lock-down drills & school shootings Condescending teachers Reductive, decontextualized, irrelevant learning Is this the social justice that we want? Anxiety-disorder Segregation by race/class in the workplace Hostile workplace environment Being fired or retaliation Culturally biased workplace Over-identification of employees of color for performance evaluation Globally competitive, 21st Century employees Loss of purpose/meaning & depression Dehumanizing/devaluing of exploited people Workplace violence Condescending supervisors Reductive, decontextualized, unrewarding work
  17. 17. “Self” cannot fully thrive in a place that is socially and environmentally exploited. “Community” health affects “self” health and vice versa. Contributing to exploitation denies us well-being. Public schooling is designed to make students contribute to exploitation (consumerism, wealth concentration, exploiting people around the planet) not towards thriving. CASEL and RULER (similarly with restorative justice), by themselves, may do more harm than good because they are creating expectations of “regulation” in contexts of exploitation and loss of meaning/purpose. Partial (Implicitly Biased) View of SEL in Schools SEL Bias Towards “ProuDociletarianism” Self-regulate as a greed-oriented, pre-employee who measures success against “American” affluent consumerism -- which creates depression, lack of purpose, and exploitation mindsets.
  18. 18. “Emotional equity” with an eye on the external stability is a more meaningful, complete way to support both well-being and moving towards sustainability.
  19. 19. Step 1: Recognize and be open Step 2: Envision a thriving community Step 3: Social injustices and relentless stress Step 4: Transition from “bad” to “good” stress Step 5: Humanize before extreme emotion Step 6: Humanize after extreme emotion Step 7: Strategies for growth Step 8: Purpose, relationships, growth Integrative Emotional Equity in 8 Steps Schools should be spaces for joyfulness and intentional growth
  20. 20. Integrative Emotional Equity - Step #1 Legalized and Intentional Exploitation Acknowledge the past openly and willingly. The U.S. has been a punishing place for people of color and remains so. And, that’s just racism! Providing emotional support is tied to historically created identities. Recognize history, implicit bias, and current conditions of exploitation
  21. 21. Integrative Emotional Equity - Step #2 Working for Foundational Societal Change Are we truly in favor of a new human paradigm? Have some solid views of that possible existence. How are currently exploited people living in that existence? How are you responsible for supporting change? Start by having a mindset of thriving people and nature. You can’t change everything, but you can change your treatment of people. Envision a thriving community where we are responsible to each other and nature.
  22. 22. Integrative Emotional Equity - Step #3 Teachers as Emotional Stabilizers Students in chronic stress due to social injustices and exploitation need adults who believe in them and give them more emotional supports to get to the high bar. Don’t give up on them. They need you. Aim to be a strong emotional stabilizer in their lives. Social injustices are sources of chronic, relentless stress.
  23. 23. Integrative Emotional Equity - Step #4 Challenge, Accomplishment & Recovery We cannot grow into our fully actualized selves without challenges, but they need to be coupled with accomplishment and recovery. Know your students relationship with “bad” chronic stress before challenging them with “good” stress. Students with high levels of “bad” chronic stress first need caring adults who have a stabilizing effect on them. Transition from “bad” stress to “good” stress.
  24. 24. Integrative Emotional Equity - Step #5 Before an Extreme Emotion Understand that high levels of chronic stress make for more extreme emotions when new stress is added. Be aware of students who are “hitting the wall” emotionally before an extreme behavior arrives. Give students breaks. Talk with them. Let them know that you have their back. Do that BEFORE an extreme emotional response. Humanizing students and preventing extreme emotions
  25. 25. Integrative Emotional Equity - Step #5 Teachers As Emotional Analyzers Ask if you’re adding stress into the classroom that is adding to “bad” stress even if you think that it is “good” stress. Are your students “calm,” “alert,” or “alarmed?” Look for students in the “alert” stage. Emotionally stabilizing comes with reassurance that they can make mistakes, but still rely on you and trust that emotional recovery is always possible. Return to emotional calm is needed prior to cognitive activity (“good” stress)
  26. 26. Integrative Emotional Equity - Step #6 After an Extreme Emotion Chronic stress will make anyone have more extreme moments. Provide understanding and sympathy. Address the source of the emotion BEFORE discussing any problematic behavior. Problematic behaviors are a symptom of insecurities and emotional wounds. Attend to those first. Kids with chronic stress need solid strategies going forward. Humanizing students and addressing extreme emotions
  27. 27. Integrative Emotional Equity - Step #7 Strategies for Life Growth over punishment. Schools provide students with formal learning experiences addressing sources of stress and specific strategies for living with them. Schools should be emotions-oriented (personal growth and stability), not behavior-oriented (no ISS/OSS/expulsion). Strategies for stability Strategies for growth Strategies beyond school
  28. 28. Integrative Emotional Equity - Step #8 Well-being and Sustainability Teaching towards happiness is at the core of social emotional learning. A thriving society needs people who are well equipped to work with each other, connect their purposes with mindsets of responsibility, not greed. Deep growth happens in the context of purpose, not just for its own sake. Creating a more thriving society is a worthy context. Purpose Relationships Growth

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