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CIT Retail Outlook

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La plus grande part des ventes (46%) des retailers provient toujours encore des magasins physiques. Le web et le mobile génèrent quant à eux 41% des ventes.

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CIT Retail Outlook

  1. 1. CIT Retail Outlook © 2016 CIT Group Inc. CIT and the CIT logo are registered service marks of CIT Group Inc.  1 KEY HEADLINES FROM THE RESEARCH z Retailers Give Promising Outlook for FY2017: Pervasive Optimism for the Web; More Static in the Store and HQ z Retailers Predict a Successful Holiday Season: Biggest Boost from Internet z The Competitive Landscape Continues to Shift: Priority Placed on Fast Fashion and Pop-Ups z Brick-and-Mortar Stores Are in a State of Flux: Already in Transition to a Different Role that Supports Online z Web Presence Is Now the Price of Entry in Retail: Omni-Channel Approach Working for the Most Part z Mobile and Social Offer Competitive Advantage: Even Incorporated into Hiring Goals and Practices z Consumer Confidence Still High, According to Retailers: Regulations Also Favored by Slight Majority z Change Is the Name of the Game: Sharpen Focus Even More on Customer Needs z Efficient Supply Chain Is Essential: Same Concerns and Planning Remain as Last Year z Differences by Size of Retailer: Middle Market Retailers Are Generally More Optimistic about the Industry; but More Pessimistic about Their Own Growth Despite challenging same store sales, middle market retailers are surprisingly bullish. Most retailers are hopeful that they will have a successful Holiday Season and will achieve an increase in total sales for FY16. They also have plans to continue that growth for the next three years and to increase hiring for next year, especially in the internet/ mobile category. Not unexpectedly, the retail landscape continues to transition to a more online-heavy and store-light model. A web presence is now considered essential. Most middle market retailers have already begun to generate an omni-channel approach, with their physical stores playing a more complementary role to their digital plans than they did in the past. Retailers express a clear strategic focus on their growing e-presence including further technology development, a change in their hiring priorities and incorporation of a mobile channel. The general feeling is that brand strength and popularity of prominent retailers is steadily eroding, and many may not exist three years from now. Middle market retailers have experienced continued challenges from alternative offerings like fast fashion and pop-up shops, forcing a more analytic review of their customers’ needs and a sharper focus on innovation and flexibility. Most helpful to retailers in the coming year will be the strength of consumer confidence, the availability of consumer and business financing, and certain regulations involving labor, manufacturing and information security. Generally, the sentiment expressed by middle market retailers parallels that of large retailers, but the middle market demonstrates a more cautious optimism about their present condition, the upcoming holidays and the near-term future. They are similarly more reserved in their hopefulness about mobile and online. But that said, large retailers tend to have a more critical view of the industry landscape including the likely demise of several prominent retailers and competitive pressure from alternative options, like fast fashion and pop-ups. In order to uncover these trends and challenges (as well as the general outlook) for the retail industry, Harris Poll, on behalf of CIT, a leader in financing and treasury management services to the retail sector, conducted an online survey from August 3 to 26, 2016. Respondents are financial decision makers in 259 U.S.-based middle market retailers (revenue between $5 million and $2.9 billion) and 51 U.S.-based large business retailers (revenue of $3 billion or more).
  2. 2. CIT Retail Outlook © 2016 CIT Group Inc. CIT and the CIT logo are registered service marks of CIT Group Inc.  2 For the most part, middle market retailers offer a confident and positive view of the current state of their business. Holding steady for the past two years, 4 in 5 describe their finances as healthy or very healthy—and most envision more sales growth in 2017. The progress is not seen as coming from each sales channel equally. Middle market retailers are far more optimistic about sales from their website and mobile offering than their store, catalog or phone channel (for which expectations have been pulled back significantly since last year). As an example, last year, two-thirds of retailers believed that their physical stores would see a sales lift over the coming three years. Today, there has been a big drop in optimism as only 2 in 5 feel that way. By contrast, at least 7 in 10 envision sales continuing to rise from website and mobile over the same near-term period. Middle market retailers also anticipate growth across a wide variety of employees cohorts, but again most commonly in the internet/mobile category, along with hourly staff. Only about one-quarter believe the number of executives working at their headquarters will rise. Notably the optimism regarding staff seems to be more cautious today. The expected growth in mobile/internet and in-store exempt employees is more limited than it was one year ago. Retailers Give Promising Outlook for FY2017 Pervasive Optimism for the Web; More Static in the Store and HQ VIEW ON SALES STAFF OUTLOOK IN 2017 Number of staff devoted to internet/mobile sales channels 2016: 54% vs. 2015: 62% Total number of hourly employees 2016: 52% vs. 2015: 54% Number of in-store exempt employees 2016: 40% vs. 2015: 51% z Looking forward to 2017, 48% expect that the total number of hours worked by hourly employees will increase, and 26% say the number of headquarters executives will increase. Less than half anticipate an increase from in-store sales (much less than the 65% last year) Believe they will see an increase in catalog/phone sales (compared to 40% in 2015) Though slightly down from last year, nearly 1 in 5 retail executives (17%, down from 22%) anticipate an increase in total sales of more than 10%. z Almost 4 in 5 (79%) anticipate an increase in total sales of 1% or more for fiscal year 2016, similar to previous years. Only 9% expect a decrease, whereas 13% expect sales to remain the same. 80% OF RETAILERS SAY... their overall financial condition is healthy or very healthy Similar to 2014 and 2015 after an increase from only 70% in 2013 SALES WILL INCREASE As seen last year, more than 7 in 10 retailers believe... FROM WEBSITE (75%) AND MOBILE (72%) THREE YEARS FROM NOW 42% 24% Though muted from last year, many retailers expect an increase in…
  3. 3. CIT Retail Outlook © 2016 CIT Group Inc. CIT and the CIT logo are registered service marks of CIT Group Inc.  3 The majority of middle market retailers offer a promising picture of what the holidays (from Thanksgiving to New Year’s) will look like this year. More than 1 in 5 (21%) expect an increase of more than 10% in sales this Holiday Season— almost no one today thinks sales will decline. In all areas, middle market retailers are optimistic that during the holidays, the number of hourly employees will increase as well as their hours worked. The number of other employees (like in-store exempt or headquarter executives) will also likely hold steady or rise. The price of fuel isn’t seen as having nearly the impact that it did last year. Rather, the biggest contributors to holiday sales are expected to be online shopping, in-store or online discounts and Black Friday promotions. In response to the perceived relevance of the internet, over 1 in 2 middle market retailers also believe they will need to dedicate even more staff to web/mobile channels (though expectations for staff growth are not as dramatic as a year ago, perhaps because they have already increased staff to the necessary level). Retailers Predict a Successful Holiday Season Biggest Boost from Internet DURING THE 2016 HOLIDAY SEASON z The price of fuel is not expected to have nearly as big of an impact as it did last year (32%, compared to 39% in 2015). 3 in 5 retailers anticipate total sales for the 2016 Holiday Season to increase by 6% (or more) over the previous season 60%expect an increase in 2016 Holiday Season sales 56%NUMBER OF HOURLY EMPLOYEES 54%STAFF DEVOTED TO INTERNET/MOBILE SALES 52%HOURS WORKED BY HOURLY EMPLOYEES 40%NUMBER OF IN-STORE EXEMPT EMPLOYEES 47% 44% BLACK FRIDAY PROMOTIONS IN-STORE OR ONLINE DISCOUNTS expect an expansion of expect an expansion of Most retailers expect to increase the… NEARLY HALF EXPECT AN INCREASE IN ONLINE SHOPPING to have the biggest incremental impact on holiday sales compared to only 1 in 3 retailers (33%) back in 2013. 49% ONLINE SHOPPING
  4. 4. CIT Retail Outlook © 2016 CIT Group Inc. CIT and the CIT logo are registered service marks of CIT Group Inc.  4 No longer do prominent and well-established retailers hold the top position in the retail world. At least, they are not seen as having the same cachet as they did in the past, and instead may be losing ground to alternative options like pop-up retailers and fast fashion stores. A slight majority of middle market retailers believe that fast-fashion and pop-up options present a rising challenge to middle market and large retailers. And, nearly 2 in 5 go further to say that these foreign fast fashion retailers have hurt their business and have hampered their ability to compete. More than 1 in 2 middle market retailers have already seen some erosion in the consumer appeal and overall brand value of the more prominent retailers (a slight increase in pessimism from last year). Seven in ten now believe that at least one prominent retailer will shut down in the next one to three years. More than half (51%) do not believe that offbrand or outlet stores are a good idea, instead potentially causing harm to a company’s image. Three-fourths of retail executives say they use sales tactics that focus on markdowns and bundle pricing. And most put forward these sales quite frequently (for over one-third, at least once a month or more). The Competitive Landscape Continues to Shift Priority Placed on Fast Fashion and Pop-Ups z Middle market and large retailers agree (53%) that fast fashion retailers (such as HM, Zara, Uniqlo, etc.) are taking consumers away from U.S. middle market retailers and pose a threat to other categories of goods. â Almost 2 in 5 (37%) say that foreign fast fashion retailers have affected their ability to compete, especially for online-only retailers (68%) more than omni-channel retailers. z Three in five (60%) believe that pop-up retailers are creating greater competition for larger, more established retailers. z More than 1 in 2 retailers (55%, up from 50% in 2015) feel that the consumer appeal and overall brand value of prominent retailers is on the decline. â However, this sentiment was much higher two years ago in 2014 (65%). z Seven in ten (70%, up from 66% last year) believe one or more prominent retailers will likely disappear in the next 1-3 years. z Over half (51%) believe that offbrand and outlet stores erode a brand’s value. THREE-QUARTERS OF RETAILERS (76%) USE SALES TACTICS THAT FOCUS ON OF RETAILERS OVER 3 IN 5 RETAILERS (63%) have sales multiple times per year but less than once per month, especially online-only retailers (75%) compared to omni-channel retailers (47%). have sales at least once a month, if not more often BUNDLE PRICING MARKDOWNS 44% 32% 36%
  5. 5. CIT Retail Outlook © 2016 CIT Group Inc. CIT and the CIT logo are registered service marks of CIT Group Inc.  5 Today, retail sales from physical stores still outperform, on average, those from website and mobile combined (46% to 41%, respectively). And, many believe that innovation (and creating a unique shopping experience) is a way to attract more customers to the brick-and-mortar channel. That said, over 1 in 2 middle market retailers believe that it will be impossible to survive in the future without an online presence. Already today, physical stores appear to be going through a transition. Almost 3 in 5 (though less than last year) are using their stores differently than they have in the past, and over 4 in 5 have adapted the role of their physical stores to be more closely aligned with their digital strategy. The majority feel that their stores are just the right size right now to manage the demand, but at the same time, many (more than one-third) admit they have certain stores that underperform and would like to shut them down. Nearly 3 in 5 retailers believe they are using physical stores differently than they were one year ago (56%, less than the 65% from 2015). z 82% feel they are using their physical stores in a way that complements their digital channels. Brick-and-Mortar Stores Are in a State of Flux Already in Transition to a Different Role that Supports Online SALE SOURCES More than one-third of retailers (35%) say they have too many stores in underperforming locations and would like to close them. z These underperforming stores are most likely characterized by an inconvenient location (56%), or being too close to (53%) or too far away from (52%) relevant competition. More than 4 in 5 (81%) feel that providing a unique shopping experience is an innovative way to attract new customers to brick- and-mortar stores. 82% Over 4 in 5 retailers say... their stores are the right size PHYSICAL STORES CATALOG/PHONE 13% WEBSITE MOBILE 46% On average, retailers say that their sales come from the following places… 26% 15%
  6. 6. CIT Retail Outlook © 2016 CIT Group Inc. CIT and the CIT logo are registered service marks of CIT Group Inc.  6 Middle market retailers are much more likely to say that their revenue is growing from website sales than from physical in-store sales. This gap is greater today than it was the previous year: 30 percentage points (75% from website vs. 45% in-store) in 2016, compared to 12 percentage points (71% vs. 59%) in 2015. So it is not surprising that having an online presence is the #1 strategic investment for 2016 (also in the top four are two other components of e-commerce: social media and digital marketing). Nearly all retailers believe that their omni-channel approach is working well right now. The channels are also supporting each other rather than competing; 3 in 5 even say very well. Furthermore, they use their online sales growth as the primary gauge. Technology is the biggest challenge in getting everything to work seamlessly, and by extension, it is also the most prominent part of the strategy going forward. Middle market retailers are less likely to feel struggles with the omni-approach this year, compared to one year ago. And they are also much more likely to see the advantages (than the disadvantages) of encouraging this inter-dependence, with incentives like free shipping and free returns even in the store. About half of retailers are also allowing pick-up of online orders and fulfilling online orders in the store to connect their channels together and ensure they work together well. z Even more than last year, the most popular strategic investments are: having an online presence (50%), followed by digital marketing (46%), social media (44%) and traditional marketing (41%). z 77% agree that consumers’ ability to comparison shop online has created a greater need for retailers to be transparent about their pricing. Web Presence Is Now the Price of Entry in Retail Omni-Channel Approach Working for the Most Part z Retailers are less likely to say revenue is growing from stores (45%, compared to 59% in 2015) than the website (75%, compared to 71%). â Expected growth from mobile is also high at 65%, while phone/catalog is low at 28%. â About 1 in 5 (22%) say the website is growing faster than other channels, and almost the same proportion (20%) feel that way about mobile. z The vast majority (91%) believe that all the channels they have made available to customers are working together at least somewhat well to enhance the customer experience. 60% say “very well.” â Almost 3 in 5 (56%, less than last year at 63%) believe that it has been challenging to implement an omni- channel strategy that provides a seamless experience to consumers. â The primary challenges in getting all channels to work together are: updating technology (50%), followed by training retail associates on using different channels (41%) and building data management systems (38%). â In order to connect their channels, the key strategies have been to: update technology (51%), fulfill online orders in physical stores (49%) and offer online orders with pick up in the store (47%). â The criteria to determine if their channels are working successfully together are: online sales growth (65%), and less so, mobile sales growth (49%) and physical store sales growth (47%). z Most retailers (71%, up from 61% last year) believe the benefits outweigh the risks, if only slightly, of offering free shipping, free returns or in-store returns to customers who shop on the website. The biggest investment priority for omni-channel retailers is… 73%ONLINE PRESENCE
  7. 7. CIT Retail Outlook © 2016 CIT Group Inc. CIT and the CIT logo are registered service marks of CIT Group Inc.  7 Most middle market retailers feel relatively confident in their knowledge of social media strategies, continuing a steady upward trend from 2013. And virtually all retail executives know that social media must be a key part of their strategic plan (i.e., no one today is ambivalent). About 3 in 5 have even changed their hiring practices to keep pace with their digital and social strategy. Revenue is also seen as growing from mobile, even more than it was last year. Mobile apps are viewed as offering a competitive advantage to retailers, and half have already begun to create apps themselves. Most retailers have taken clear steps to invest in mobile, like updating their website and increasing their email campaigns. They also expect to add staff to their internet/mobile sales channels. Nearly 7 in 10 understand that it is a tricky balance in providing a highly customized and optimized customer experience while simultaneously easing customers’ anxiety about how much personal information they own (though this concern is somewhat diminished from last year). Similar to last year, almost 7 in 10 middle market retailers consider themselves “advanced” or “expert” (67%) when it comes to social media strategies (68% in 2015 and 53% in 2014). And like last year, almost no one today is ambivalent (2%). z Not surprisingly, online-only retailers (29%) are nearly three times more likely to feel they are an expert than omni-channel retailers (11%). z Nearly 3 in 5 (58%, less than last year at 68%) have changed their hiring practices to keep up with their digital and social strategy. Mobile and Social Offer Competitive Advantage Even Incorporated into Hiring Goals and Practices NEW TECHNOLOGIES z The most common steps that retailers use to take advantage of mobile technology remain: creating mobile applications (51%, up from 43% in 2015); updating their website to meet consumer needs (50%, up from 45%); and increasing email campaigns (46%, down from 52%). 65% OF RETAILERS BELIEVE REVENUE IS GROWING FROM MOBILE UP FROM 57% LAST YEAR A majority (54%) expects an increase in the number of staff they have devoted to internet/mobile sales channels. Almost 7 in 10 (67%, a decline from last year at 75%) believe that with their mobile strategy, they are constantly balancing providing an optimal, customized consumer experience without alarming consumers about the amount of information they hold. z Omni-channel retailers (88%) are more likely to feel this way than those who are solely online (65%). Three-fourths of retail executives say that retailers with mobile apps have an advantage over those who do not. 75% 53% mobile app advantage OF OMNI-CHANNEL RETAILERS HAVE REBALANCED MARKETING DOLLARS away from traditional channels (print, radio, etc.) toward new technologies to take advantage of mobile technology, compared to only 18% of online retailers and 27% of brick-and-mortar retailers.
  8. 8. CIT Retail Outlook © 2016 CIT Group Inc. CIT and the CIT logo are registered service marks of CIT Group Inc.  8 A slight majority of middle market retailers identify several key external factors that they believe will give a positive boost to their business over the next year. Consumer confidence and availability of financing are both expected to offer a lift to business performance heading into 2017. Moreover, regulations involving labor, manufacturing and information security are expected to be most influential (in a good way) to about half of retailers. Consumer Confidence Still High, According to Retailers Regulations Also Favored by Slight Majority LABOR MANUFACTURING LAWS z The majority of retailers expect consumer confidence (63%) to have a positive impact on their business over the next twelve months, along with the availability of consumer (65%) and business (59%) credit/financing. MIDDLE MARKET RETAILERS VIEW The Marketplace Fairness Act MORE FAVORABLY THAN THEY DID ONE YEAR AGO... As in 2015, retailers see federal laws/ regulations involving labor (54%) and manufacturing (51%) as having the most positive impact on the growth of their business. z This is the same top two as last year, along with information security (51%). z Middle Market retailers are equally divided on the Marketplace Fairness Act. Half (50%, up from 46% in 2015) favor the act in order to level the playing field between remote sellers and local retailers. The other half (50%, down from 54% in 2015) oppose the act. SENTIMENT IS NOW EQUALLY DIVIDED more than omni-channel retailers (45% and 50%, respectively) LABOR LAWS MANUFACTURING LAWS 0NLINE-ONLY RETAILERS ARE MORE LIKELY TO CITE THE BENEFITS OF… 81% 73% Federal Laws/ Government Regulations WITH NEGATIVE IMPACT SALES TAXATION HEALTHCARE PAYROLL TAXATION MINIMUM WAGE 26% 23% 25% 21%
  9. 9. CIT Retail Outlook © 2016 CIT Group Inc. CIT and the CIT logo are registered service marks of CIT Group Inc.  9 The top trends in the retail industry still hold from last year, but in 2016 there appears to be an increased emphasis on standing out and being different. Today, middle market retailers see the most potential in both e-commerce and experience shopping. Moreover, being equipped with only traditional retail skills will not be sufficient in 2017; retail executives must also have a keen knowledge of analytics, technology and even engineering. And, they must actively consume and apply information about their customers’ needs and interests. In addition, there remain a few key challenges. Middle market retailers generally recognize that they need to demonstrate an effective plan to deal with cybersecurity risks and data breaches. Notably, over 7 in 10 agree that the current shift to chip-enabled credit and debit cards (EMV) provide protection for consumers. With changing trends in financial technology, 3 in 5 middle market retailers also mention that it can occasionally be a struggle to incorporate new forms of payment like Apple Pay and Google Wallet. Change Is the Name of the Game Sharpen Focus Even More on Customer Needs CHANGES TO BUSINESS z Approximately 4 in 5 (79%) say their business has an effective plan to deal with risks in cyber security and data breaches at point of sale, if these issues were to arise. z About three-quarters (72%) feel that the current shift to chip-enabled credit and debit cards (EMV) provides protection for consumers. z Around 3 in 5 (61%) feel that in light of the current economic climate, their company has decided to move business functions like design, warehousing, distributions and logistics in-house to improve profit margins. z Similar to previous years, a slight majority of retailers (52%, down from 54% in 2015), agree that U.S. consumers care more than ever about buying products that are exclusively “Made in America.” Almost three-fifths of retail executives SAY IT IS CHALLENGING TO INCORPORATE NEW FORMS OF PAYMENT59% Three-quarters (75%, down from 80% last year) believe that executives in the retail industry today need to be well versed in areas like analytics, technology and engineering in addition to having traditional retail skills. z More than 4 in 5 (84%) believe that now more than ever, it is important for retailers to use analytics and data to better understand who consumers are and how they want to engage with retailers. The STRATEGIES that are seen as having the most potential for growth for the retail industry as a whole are: 59% e-commerce 51% experience shopping
  10. 10. CIT Retail Outlook © 2016 CIT Group Inc. CIT and the CIT logo are registered service marks of CIT Group Inc.  10 There is fairly widespread agreement that an efficient supply chain is crucial to online retailers. But over 2 in 5 middle market retailers express some concerns about their supply chain’s viability and the impact of U.S. infrastructure (though this issue has dissipated somewhat from last year). Most middle market retailers feel somewhat—but not overwhelmingly­—prepared to deal with unexpected changes to their supply chain and have taken at least some action to prepare in advance (like expanding supplier partnerships, increasing technology use and building inventory early). z More than 4 in 5 (83%) believe that online retailers need an efficient supply chain to provide products in a timely manner. z Nearly half (48%, down from last year at 61%) believe that the state of the U.S. infrastructure is impacting their company’s ability to get goods from one place to another. However, there has been a significant decrease in those very concerned (from 19% in 2015 to 9%). z Over 2 in 5 retailers (44%) are concerned about the viability of their supply chain going forward, slightly down from the half (50%) who said they were concerned in 2015. Efficient Supply Chain Is Essential Same Concerns and Planning Remain as Last Year Large retailers are more worried about the viability of their supply chain (67% vs. 44%, respectively) and they are more likely to feel that the state of U.S. infrastructure (66% vs. 48%) will impact their ability to get goods from one place to another. Perhaps because of, or in spite of, this more elevated concern, they appear to be more prepared and have taken more steps to manage any unexpected changes in their supply chain. SUPPLY CHAIN CONCERNS z Nearly all retailers (94%, up from 90% in 2015) feel at least somewhat prepared to deal with unexpected changes in their supply chain, if they were to arise. 36% say they are very prepared. Most retailers have done the following in preparation for unexpected changes EXPANDING SUPPLIER PARTNERSHIPS 57%down from 61% BUILDING INVENTORY EARLY 57%up from 54% INCREASING USE OF TECHNOLOGY for logistic planning 55%down from 57%
  11. 11. CIT Retail Outlook © 2016 CIT Group Inc. CIT and the CIT logo are registered service marks of CIT Group Inc.  11 INVESTMENT PRIORITIESTwo segments of the retail industry—middle market and large businesses—were surveyed to provide a more comprehensive view of the industry’s outlook. Due to the smaller sample size of respondents from large retailers, caution should be used when interpreting results. The data suggests there may be some key directional differences between the two groups, in particular that while middle market retailers predominantly mirror the opinions of large retailers, they quite often feel less strongly or express less confidence. First and foremost, while most retailers articulate a fairly optimistic view of what the future will hold, middle market retailers are less likely to describe their financial condition as “very” healthy (26% middle market vs. 42% large) and to envision an increase in sales in the coming year (79% middle market vs. 89% large). Large retailers are also much more convinced that external factors (like the economy, gas/fuel prices, energy costs; industry consolidation; and various federal regulations) will have a positive impact on their company. And while both groups anticipate a fairly successful Holiday Season, these feelings are less widespread among the middle market (82% middle market vs. 93% large). Moreover, while middle market retailers offer a favorable view of their online and mobile presence, it is not quite as promising as it is for the large retailers. They are less confident in their mobile aptitude, less likely to characterize their ability as “expert” (13% middle market vs. 35% large) and three times more likely to call themselves “intermediate” or “beginner” (30% middle market vs. 11% large). They are less likely to say their various channels work “very” well together (60% middle market vs. 71% large); less likely to feel online shopping will make a key difference during the holidays; and less likely to foresee a boost from their Internet, mobile and catalog channels over the next three years. Differences by Size of Retailer Middle Market Retailers Are Generally More Optimistic about the Industry; but More Pessimistic about Their Own Growth NOTE: Throughout this section, percentage point differences are cited that have met or exceeded 10 percentage points. As noted, because the sample of large retailers collected for the study is small, more research will need to be done to confirm these hypotheses. The middle market generally seems to be placing much less priority on investing in physical stores and less emphasis on experience shopping, industry convergence, and in ads. 75% of middle market retailers think mobile apps have a key competitive advantage (vs. 87% of large retailers) and tend to employ a different strategy to take advantage of mobile technology 44% 41% 18% 52% SOCIAL MEDIA TRADITIONAL MARKETING MIDDLE MARKET INVESTING IN LARGE MARKET INVESTING IN vs. z Large retailers are much more likely to personally feel the strain of competition from fast fashion (51% vs. 37%) and pop-up retailers (78% vs. 60%). Larger companies are far more likely to feel that one or more key retailers will fail in the coming years (81% vs. 70%) and that a brick-and-mortar-only strategy cannot last (63% vs. 53%).
  12. 12. CIT Retail Outlook © 2016 CIT Group Inc. CIT and the CIT logo are registered service marks of CIT Group Inc.  12 Methodology 310 interviews (259 middle market, 51 large) were conducted online from August 3 to August 26, 2016, averaging approximately 18 minutes in length. Qualified respondents were age 18+, employed full-time or self- employed, a financial decision maker, working in the retail industry with more than $5 million in revenue (middle market retailer: revenue between $5 million and $2.9 billion; large retailer: revenue $3 billion or more) and having one of the following titles: z Owner z Board Member z Chief Executive Officer (CEO) z Chief Operating Officer (COO) z Chief Financial Officer (CFO) Data for the middle market segment were weighted where necessary to bring them in line with the population of interest based on the 2015 CIT Topline by Harris Poll, for the following variables: industry, title, functional role, decision-maker role, revenue, company ownership structure, and location. Other qualifying material included working in the following functional roles: Finance, General management, Operations and production, Procurement, Strategy and business development, Supply-chain management, and Treasury. Percentages were rounded to the nearest whole percent. Differences in the sums of combined categories/answers are due to rounding. About Harris Poll Over the last five decades, Harris Polls have become media staples. With comprehensive experience and precise technique in public opinion polling, along with a proven track record of uncovering consumers’ motivations and behaviors, Harris Poll has gained strong brand recognition around the world. Harris Poll offers a diverse portfolio of proprietary client solutions to transform relevant insights into actionable foresight for a wide range of industries including health care, technology, public affairs, energy, telecommunications, financial services, insurance, media, retail, restaurant and consumer packaged goods. Contact us for more information: ConsumerInsightsNAInfo@nielsen.com. ABOUT CIT Founded in 1908, CIT (NYSE: CIT) is a financial holding company with more than $65 billion in assets. Its principal bank subsidiary, CIT Bank, N.A., (Member FDIC, Equal Housing Lender) has more than $30 billion of deposits and more than $40 billion of assets. It provides financing, leasing and advisory services principally to middle market companies across more than 30 industries primarily in North America, and equipment financing and leasing solutions to the transportation sector. It also offers products and services to consumers through its Internet bank franchise and a network of retail branches in Southern California, operating as OneWest Bank, a division of CIT Bank, N.A. cit.com www.cit.com To subscribe to the CIT View from the Middle newsletter, please send an email to: viewfromthemiddle@cit.com. FOR PRESS INQUIRIES, PLEASE CONTACT Matt Klein Director, Media Relations matt.klein@cit.com FOR BUSINESS INQUIRIES, PLEASE CONTACT Debbie Haeringer Director, Content Marketing debbie.haeringer@cit.com z Chief Information Officer z Chief Investment Officer z Other C-level executive z Sr. Vice President/Vice President/Director z Head of business unit/ Head of department

La plus grande part des ventes (46%) des retailers provient toujours encore des magasins physiques. Le web et le mobile génèrent quant à eux 41% des ventes.

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