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RUDYARD
KIPLING
an English short-story writer, poet, and
novelist.
one of the most popular writers in England,
in both prose and verse, in...
Born on December 30, 1865 in Bombay, India
Mother: Alice MacDonald Kipling
Father: John Lockwood Kipling
Joseph Rudyard Ki...
At the age of 6, he was sent to Southsea,
England where he attended school and lived
with a foster family, the Holloways.
...
By the age of 11, Kipling was on the verge
of a nervous breakdown.
In 1882, Kipling was told by his parents that they
didn...
1890, Kipling ‘s star power started to grow.
Along with that is the time when he met
Caroline, his wife.
1891, Eight days ...
1893, his first daughter, Josephine was
born, and a second daughter, Elise (born
in 1896). Then his third child, John, his...
1899, his first daughter was gravely ill with
pneumonia and died.
Kipling never recovered from her death and
vowed never t...
The Tragedy of Kipling’s Son
Kipling's son John died in the First World War, at the
Battle of Loos in September 1915, at a...
January 18, 1936 Kipling suffered from a
painful ulcer, which eventually took his life.
CAREER
Poet, essayist, novelist, journalist, and writer of short
stories.
Worked as a journalist for Civil and Military Ga...
WORKS
Plain Tales from the Hills (1888)
American Notes (1891)
Barrack-Room Ballads (1892)
The Jungle Book (1894)
The Seven...
Rudyard Kipling
first published
in Rewards and
Fairies, 1910.
The poem is inspired
by Leander Starr
Jameson, and is
written in the form of...
"Britain's favorite poem."
The poem has become such an integral
part of British culture that officials at
Wimbledon's All England Lawn Tennis
and Cro...
Rudyard Kipling
If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you; B
If you can trust yourself when all...
If you can dream - and not make dreams your maste
If you can think - and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with ...
If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your...
If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch;
If neither foes nor loving...
STRUCTURE
4 stanzas with 8 lines
11 and 10 syllables rotating
Rhyme Scheme of ABABCDCD
One complete stop at the end
of the...
• Didactic poem • Closed form
• Octameter
STYLE
Didactic Poetry, is instructional poetry. The
poet expected the reader to ...
Analys
is
Who’s being referred to?
Who’s speaking?
If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;
If you can keep your
head means to r...
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too;
At the same time, we
should t...
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or, being lied about, don't deal in lies,
The lines advise
patience, honesty,...
Or, being hated, don't give way to hating,
And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise.
Advises fortitude of
character
...
If you can dream -- and not make dreams your master;
If you can think -- and not make thoughts your aim;
A consummate man ...
If you can meet with triumph and disaster
And treat those two imposters just the same;
If you can manage to
face both succ...
If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
You can speak with all the tru...
Or watchthe thingsyougave your life to broken,
And stoopand build'em up withworn-out tools;
If you can watch
everything yo...
If you canmake one heap of allyour winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
Symbolizes
willingness
to risk
ever...
And lose, and start again at your
beginnings
And never breathe a word about
your loss;
When you risk
everything at
a singl...
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is ...
If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with kings -- nor lose the common touch;
If you can talk with ma...
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you;
If all men count with you, but none too much;
If all men
support you
or f...
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds' worth of distance run --
Unforgiving
minute is a way
of saying,...
Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it,
And -- which is more -- you'll be a Man my son!
If the addressee can do ev...
Who’s being referred to?
Who’s speaking?
A father
His son
To young readers
About the
poem- A dissertation on the virtues of a good leader and exemplary manhood.
- The poem celebrates stoicism, fort...
Subject Matter
Manhood
Leadership
Ideal Characteristics
Attitude towards life
Time
Dreams
Patience
Poetic
DevicesAlliteration
don’t deal (1st stanza, 6th line)
for fools (2nd stanza, 6th line)
with worn-out (2nd stanza, 8...
Poetic
DevicesPersonification
Triumph and Disaster
Will
Unforgiving minute
Poetic
DevicesParadox
Almost every line is an example of paradox.
Kipling says do this, without doing that.
An example is,...
Poetic
DevicesPolysyndeton
It is the use of conjunctions in rapid succession instead of
punctuation marks
…heart and nerve...
Poetic
DevicesAsyndeton
Omission of conjunctions that ordinarily join coordinate
words or clauses.
Or watch the things you...
Poetic
DevicesHyperbole
“Yours is the Earth and everything in it”
Poetic
DevicesMetonymy
“Or walk with kings – nor lose the common touch”
Poetic
DevicesAnaphora
Repetition of a word/s or expression at the beginning of
successive phrases, clauses, sentences, or...
Poetic
DevicesMetaphor
A word or phrase for one thing that is used to refer to another thing in order to show
that they ar...
Poetic
DevicesSymbol
A symbol represents an idea.
Knaves represent scoundrels, liars or conman.
Crowds symbolize the commo...
The
meFollow your
dreams but
have a realistic
approach
Know the value of
self-worth without
being TOO proud of
your own qu...
If by Rudyard Kipling Analysis
If by Rudyard Kipling Analysis
If by Rudyard Kipling Analysis
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If by Rudyard Kipling Analysis

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Biography of Rudyard Kipling.
Analysis of the poem "If"

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If by Rudyard Kipling Analysis

  1. 1. RUDYARD KIPLING
  2. 2. an English short-story writer, poet, and novelist. one of the most popular writers in England, in both prose and verse, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He is regarded as a major innovator in the art of short stories. Joseph Rudyard Kipling
  3. 3. Born on December 30, 1865 in Bombay, India Mother: Alice MacDonald Kipling Father: John Lockwood Kipling Joseph Rudyard Kipling Head of the Department of Architectural Sculpture at the Jeejeebhoy School of Art in Bombay.
  4. 4. At the age of 6, he was sent to Southsea, England where he attended school and lived with a foster family, the Holloways. Joseph Rudyard Kipling
  5. 5. By the age of 11, Kipling was on the verge of a nervous breakdown. In 1882, Kipling was told by his parents that they didn’t have enough money to send him to college. 1889 met Wolcott Balestier, an American agent and publisher who quickly became one of Kipling's great friends and supporters.
  6. 6. 1890, Kipling ‘s star power started to grow. Along with that is the time when he met Caroline, his wife. 1891, Eight days after his return to England, Kipling and Caroline married.
  7. 7. 1893, his first daughter, Josephine was born, and a second daughter, Elise (born in 1896). Then his third child, John, his only son, was born in 1897.
  8. 8. 1899, his first daughter was gravely ill with pneumonia and died. Kipling never recovered from her death and vowed never to return to America.
  9. 9. The Tragedy of Kipling’s Son Kipling's son John died in the First World War, at the Battle of Loos in September 1915, at age 18. John had initially wanted to join the Royal Navy, but having had his application turned down after a failed medical examination due to poor eyesight.
  10. 10. January 18, 1936 Kipling suffered from a painful ulcer, which eventually took his life.
  11. 11. CAREER Poet, essayist, novelist, journalist, and writer of short stories. Worked as a journalist for Civil and Military Gazette, Lahore, India, 1882-89; assistant editor and overseas correspondent for the Allahabad Pioneer, Allahabad, India, 1887-89; associate editor and correspondent for The Friend, Bloemfontein, South Africa, 1900, covering the Boer War. Rector of University of St. Andrews, 1922- 25.
  12. 12. WORKS Plain Tales from the Hills (1888) American Notes (1891) Barrack-Room Ballads (1892) The Jungle Book (1894) The Seven Seas (1896) The Day’s Work (1898)
  13. 13. Rudyard Kipling
  14. 14. first published in Rewards and Fairies, 1910. The poem is inspired by Leander Starr Jameson, and is written in the form of paternal advice to the poet's son.
  15. 15. "Britain's favorite poem."
  16. 16. The poem has become such an integral part of British culture that officials at Wimbledon's All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club had a couplet from the poem inscribed above the entryway to Centre Court.
  17. 17. Rudyard Kipling
  18. 18. If you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you; B If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, But make allowance for their doubting too; If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, Or, being lied about, don't deal in lies, D Or, being hated, don't give way to hating, And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise;
  19. 19. If you can dream - and not make dreams your maste If you can think - and not make thoughts your aim; If you can meet with triumph and disaster And treat those two imposters just the same; If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools, Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken, And stoop and build 'em up with worn-out tools;
  20. 20. If you can make one heap of all your winnings And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss, And lose, and start again at your beginnings And never breathe a word about your loss; If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew To serve your turn long after they are gone, And so hold on when there is nothing in you Except the Will which says to them: "Hold on";
  21. 21. If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue, Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch; If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you; If all men count with you, but none too much; If you can fill the unforgiving minute With sixty seconds' worth of distance run, Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it, C And—which is more—you'll be a Man my son! D
  22. 22. STRUCTURE 4 stanzas with 8 lines 11 and 10 syllables rotating Rhyme Scheme of ABABCDCD One complete stop at the end of the poem with the use of an exclamation mark (!). Has parts with enjambments and caesurae.
  23. 23. • Didactic poem • Closed form • Octameter STYLE Didactic Poetry, is instructional poetry. The poet expected the reader to learn skills, science, philosophy, love, crafts, etc. from the didactic verses Closedform poetry, also known as fixed form, consists of poems that follow patterns of lines, meter, rhymes and stanzas. Octameter, a line of eight metrical feet.
  24. 24. Analys is
  25. 25. Who’s being referred to? Who’s speaking?
  26. 26. If you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you; If you can keep your head means to remain calm, collected and composed. Are losing theirs and blaming it on you - one should be able to maintain his composure even when faced with harsh criticism from those around him.
  27. 27. If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, But make allowance for their doubting too; At the same time, we should take into consideration other people’s sights and try our best to tolerate opposing views. "Look bro, if you can somehow act calmer and collected, and can believe in yourself, even when everybody else is losing it, well then…"
  28. 28. If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, Or, being lied about, don't deal in lies, The lines advise patience, honesty, and fortitude of character. Peoplemay doubtyour honestybut you shouldbe patient and tolerant to wait for the truth to emerge.
  29. 29. Or, being hated, don't give way to hating, And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise. Advises fortitude of character In behaving righteously, a person must avoid smugness.
  30. 30. If you can dream -- and not make dreams your master; If you can think -- and not make thoughts your aim; A consummate man will always have his dreams, which is his noble ideals, with which he wishes to make the world a better place. But being a sophisticated person, a man of the world, he should not allow his ideals to master or control his thoughts and action completely.
  31. 31. If you can meet with triumph and disaster And treat those two imposters just the same; If you can manage to face both success and misfortune, And act the same way in each case then… “Impostors” – neither one lasts forever - both are short-lived
  32. 32. If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools, You can speak with all the truth you want, but there will always be rascals around who will twist it to mean whatever they want and use it for their own ends.
  33. 33. Or watchthe thingsyougave your life to broken, And stoopand build'em up withworn-out tools; If you can watch everything you dedicated your life to shattered, and yet still manage to pick up the pieces then…
  34. 34. If you canmake one heap of allyour winnings And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss, Symbolizes willingness to risk everything on a venture. The need for complete detachment with which an individual should regard both profit and loss, neither of which is permanent.
  35. 35. And lose, and start again at your beginnings And never breathe a word about your loss; When you risk everything at a single throw at a hopeful gain and loses everything you have achieved you should not be disheartened. Earn, take chances, lose, be quiet about it, and move on. On the contrary, you should launch again, with full passion and without any complaint, from the start to restructure your accomplishments and reclaim your loses.
  36. 36. If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew To serve your turn long after they are gone, And so hold on when there is nothing in you Except the Will which says to them: "Hold on"; You should compel your spirit, courage and strength, (heart and nerve and sinew) to assist you and make the utmost effort to restore your achievements. Even if everything is lost, you should not lose your passion. You should stand firm on your ideals and be determined to carry on with untiring efforts to fulfill your dreams
  37. 37. If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue, Or walk with kings -- nor lose the common touch; If you can talk with many people and still keep your ethics, or hang with kings but still keep your connection with the common folks then… “KINGS” and CROWDS symbolize two societal extremes. To hang with both groups but not to be swayed by either.
  38. 38. If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you; If all men count with you, but none too much; If all men support you or find you important, but none of them too much… Be strong, impervious to potential harm. Allow neither friends nor enemies to harm you.
  39. 39. If you can fill the unforgiving minute With sixty seconds' worth of distance run -- Unforgiving minute is a way of saying, “you only got sixty seconds in a minute” no more, no less. Carpe Diem! Distance run is a long way to take. Run as far as you can with that short span of time. Make everything worth the run.
  40. 40. Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it, And -- which is more -- you'll be a Man my son! If the addressee can do everything just described (not give into hate, risk his money and lose it and not complain, talk to kings and crowds just the same, inspire people just enough)… … then the earth, and everything in it, will be his. And, even better ("which is more"), he will be a man.
  41. 41. Who’s being referred to? Who’s speaking? A father His son To young readers
  42. 42. About the poem- A dissertation on the virtues of a good leader and exemplary manhood. - The poem celebrates stoicism, fortitude, and righteousness as the hallmark of manliness. - From the poem we can observe that there is much truth and wisdom within those motivational words given.
  43. 43. Subject Matter Manhood Leadership Ideal Characteristics Attitude towards life Time Dreams Patience
  44. 44. Poetic DevicesAlliteration don’t deal (1st stanza, 6th line) for fools (2nd stanza, 6th line) with worn-out (2nd stanza, 8th line) sixty seconds (4th stanza, 6th line) treat those two (2nd stanza, 4th line)
  45. 45. Poetic DevicesPersonification Triumph and Disaster Will Unforgiving minute
  46. 46. Poetic DevicesParadox Almost every line is an example of paradox. Kipling says do this, without doing that. An example is, “If you can think – and not make thoughts your aim” If you’re aiming to think, how can you not make thoughts your aim?
  47. 47. Poetic DevicesPolysyndeton It is the use of conjunctions in rapid succession instead of punctuation marks …heart and nerve and sinew
  48. 48. Poetic DevicesAsyndeton Omission of conjunctions that ordinarily join coordinate words or clauses. Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
  49. 49. Poetic DevicesHyperbole “Yours is the Earth and everything in it”
  50. 50. Poetic DevicesMetonymy “Or walk with kings – nor lose the common touch”
  51. 51. Poetic DevicesAnaphora Repetition of a word/s or expression at the beginning of successive phrases, clauses, sentences, or verses. “If you can…”
  52. 52. Poetic DevicesMetaphor A word or phrase for one thing that is used to refer to another thing in order to show that they are similar. If you can make one heap of all your winnings And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss, (2nd stanza, lines 1-2) Worn-out tools (2nd stanza, 8th line) refer to the feeling of total exhaustion that can force someone to give up.
  53. 53. Poetic DevicesSymbol A symbol represents an idea. Knaves represent scoundrels, liars or conman. Crowds symbolize the common folk/people. Kings represent the important people in society. Common touch represents humility.
  54. 54. The meFollow your dreams but have a realistic approach Know the value of self-worth without being TOO proud of your own qualities.

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