Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.

Diversity.zachariah bernard

512 vues

Publié le

Managing Multigeneration employees and employees with disabilities.

Publié dans : Business
  • Soyez le premier à commenter

  • Soyez le premier à aimer ceci

Diversity.zachariah bernard

  1. 1. By: Zach Bernard<br />Managing multigenerational employees and employees with disabilities <br />
  2. 2. For the first time in history, the workplace includes four often distinct generations, each with unique strengths, expectations, motivations, and work styles. <br />The prospect of managing workgroups consisting of such a wide potential age range presents several challenges, but it also can yield significant opportunities.<br />What is a multigenerational workforce?<br />
  3. 3. A Generational Snapshot<br />Understanding the Generational Characteristics in the Workforce<br />Impact on the workforce<br /> Strategies for a multigenerational workforce<br />Outline<br />
  4. 4. Silent Generation<br />Silent Generation / Traditionalists (Born between 1920 - 1945).<br />Great Depression and World War II <br />Currently as of 2010 their ages range from 65 to 90.<br />Baby Boomers<br />The United State Census Bureau considers this to be someone born during the demographic birth boom between 1946 and 1964.<br />Dramatic Social change and The Vietnam War<br />Currently as of 2010 their ages range from 46 to 64.<br />A Generational Snapshot….<br />
  5. 5. A Generational Snapshot….<br />Generation X<br />Born between 1965–1979. This generation is the children of both Traditionalists and Baby Boomers.<br />Fall of the Berlin Wall and Desert Storm<br />Currently as of 2010 their ages range from 31 to 45.<br />Generation Y<br />Gen Y / Millennial’s (Born between 1980-1999). <br />September 11 and Barrack Obama<br />Currently as of 2010 their ages range from 11 to 30.<br />
  6. 6. Understanding the Generational Characteristics in the Workforce<br />
  7. 7. Understanding the Generational Characteristics in the Workforce<br />
  8. 8. Understanding the Generational Characteristics in the Workforce<br />
  9. 9. Understanding the Generational Characteristics in the Workforce<br />
  10. 10. Understanding the Generational Characteristics in the Workforce<br />“How are they motivated?”<br />
  11. 11. Impact on the Workforce<br />
  12. 12. Impact on the Workforce….“A Forecast for the Future”<br />Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Projections<br />
  13. 13. “All employees no matter what generation want ……”<br />To be respected and receive equitable and fair treatment<br />Flexibility to balance work, family and personal needs and goals<br />Provided opportunities for education, training, feedback and advancement <br />Strategies for a Multigenerational Workforce<br />
  14. 14. Strategies for a Multigenerational Workforce<br />The Five pathways to success<br />
  15. 15. Strategies for a Multigenerational Workforce<br />Retention strategies <br />
  16. 16. Strategies for a Multigenerational Workforce<br />Retention strategies <br />
  17. 17. Managing Employees with Disabilities<br />Outline<br />What does the ADA consider a disability<br />What accommodations must employers make for a disabled employee<br />Myths and Facts employers need to know<br />The Big three, “Reasons to hire disabled workers.”<br />Disability toolkit for managers<br />
  18. 18. What Qualifies as a Disability?<br />The ADA has a three-part definition of "disability.“<br />Under the ADA, an individual with a disability is a person who:<br />Has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities; <br />Has a record of such an impairment; or <br />Is regarded as having such an impairment. <br />
  19. 19. A physical impairment is defined by the ADA as:<br />"Any physiological disorder or condition, cosmetic disfigurement, or anatomical loss affecting one or more of the following body systems: neurological, musculoskeletal, special sense organs, respiratory (including speech organs), cardiovascular, reproductive, digestive, genitourinary, hemic and lymphatic, skin, and endocrine."<br />What Qualifies as a Disability?<br />
  20. 20. A mental impairment is defined by the ADA as: <br />"any mental or psychological disorder, such as mental retardation, organic brain syndrome, emotional or mental illness, and specific learning disabilities."<br />What Qualifies as a Disability?<br />
  21. 21. What accommodations do employers have to make for disabled employees.<br />Reasonable accommodation may include:<br /><ul><li>Providing or modifying equipment or devices
  22. 22. Making the workplace readily accessible to and usable by people with disabilities.
  23. 23. Adjusting or modifying examinations, training materials, or policies.
  24. 24. modified work schedules
  25. 25. Providing readers and interpreters</li></li></ul><li>Myths and Facts<br />
  26. 26. Myths and Facts<br />Job Accommodation Network (JAN), a service of the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy<br />
  27. 27. Myths and Facts<br />
  28. 28. Myths and Facts<br />
  29. 29. The Big three, “Reasons to hire disabled workers.”<br />(Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy.) <br />
  30. 30. Disability toolkit for managers<br />Disability toolkit for managers<br />Understand the laws that protect disabled employees, under the ADA and EEOC.<br />Show support.<br />Be proactive in helping the disabled employees keep their benefits.<br />Provide accommodations.<br />Have a disaster preparedness plan for disabled employees.<br />
  31. 31. Conclusion<br />~ Diversity: the art of thinking independently together. ~ <br />-Steve Forbes<br />

×